WWF’s role: Tackling the drivers of nature loss and accelerating our actions

To reverse nature loss, the world must protect and restore land, freshwater and marine natural habitats for the benefit of nature and people; at the same time we urgently need to reduce humanity’s footprint on earth and move to sustainable practices in agriculture and food systems, forestry, fisheries, energy and mining, infrastructure and construction.

WWF has set out its strategic direction led by three clear ambitions:
 

          

 

Examples of projects supported by philanthropic partners...

Alt text

We have developed a plan to protect 70% of the world's climate resilient reefs by 2030.

BUT...
Alt text

If we don't accelerate our actions, 70 - 90% of tropical coral reefs will be extinct by 2050. By joining as a partner, you can help change this.

Alt text

We helped to establish a US $43 million project finance for permanence fund covering 2 million hectares of Bhutan’s forests

BUT...
Alt text

Around the world we are still losing 10 million hectares of forest per year.

Alt text

A ban on free plastic bags in China has been introduced.

BUT...
Alt text

We are still likely to be producing 40% more plastic by the end of the decade than we do today. With more philanthropic partnerships joining together to face the plastics problem, we can change this.

Alt text

Amur tiger numbers are on the rise in Eastern Russia, contributing to the global increase in wild tiger numbers.

BUT...
Alt text

Poaching, the illegal wildlife trade and habitat loss remain a constant threat to their future. With more philanthropic partnerships we can continue to change this.

WWF logo