Food | WWF
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Food

The food system is the single biggest threat to nature today

It uses most of our natural resources, with 69% of all our water and 34% of our land. It has caused 75% of deforestation, 30% of topsoil erosion and contributes at least 24% of greenhouse gas emissions.

It is not creating healthy people or a healthy planet. 821 million people are hungry while 1.9 billion are overweight or obese. The food system has caused 70% of biodiversity loss and has led to 93% of all our fish stocks being fished to their limits or beyond.

And yet, we don't even eat all the food we produce - around one third of it is lost in the supply chain or thrown away.

The problems are clear. We all need to eat, but the way we produce and consume food is putting an impossible strain on the planet. And with the world’s population set to grow from 7 billion today to more than 9 billion by 2050 it's clear the food system needs to change – urgently.

food 2.0: transforming the food system to provide nutritious food to all current and future generations while protecting biodiversity
We must work more closely, and across sectors, to accelerate our action and raise awareness of the need for change
WWF wishes to convene stakeholders from across the food system and integrate decisions that will ensure human and planetary health. Together, we have the power to bring food to the top of the conservation agenda and help deliver tangible results which protect our future.

Our goal is to create sustainable food systems that safeguard the variety of life on Earth while ensuring food security, now and in the future. To achieve this, WWF works to improve how our food is produced, to change the way we eat, and to ensure food goes in our bodies not in the bin. Together with others, we are focusing on three key outcomes by 2030:

- Half of the area used for agriculture and aquaculture is sustainably managed, with no new areas being converted
- Global food waste is halved and post-harvest loss is reduced
- Half of food consumption is in line with World Health Organisation dietary guidelines in target countries:

“To transform the food system, to achieve Food 2.0, we need to increase people’s awareness of where food comes from, and change our behaviours to ensure the proper functioning of our food system.”

João Campari
WWF Food Practice Leader
@WWFLeadFood

If food is produced more sustainably, distributed fairly and consumed more responsibly, we can improve both human and planetary health
By improving production efficiency and restoring and reusing farmland, we can keep forests standing and reduce the impact on rivers and oceans – helping to restore wildlife populations and protect the livelihoods of many millions of people.

By changing our consumption patterns and providing access to nutritious food for all, we tackle all forms of malnutrition.

And, finally, by tackling food loss and waste, we can ensure that every calorie counts, making a real difference to climate change and protecting life on our planet.

THE GOOD NEWS IS WE CAN MAKE THE FOOD SYSTEM WORK FOR PEOPLE AND NATURE

WE CAN FEED THE WORLD WITHOUT DESTROYING MORE FORESTS, RIVERS AND OCEANS

Planet to plate: what we're doing
© Simon Rawles
© Michel Gunther / WWF

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