The Black Rhino Range Expansion Project

Celiwe Shangase (right) and Thokozile Mbatha are two of 30 previously unemployed people who have ... rel=
Celiwe Shangase (right) and Thokozile Mbatha are two of 30 previously unemployed people who have been contracted to fence the eMakhosini Ophathe Heritage Park which will become Site 2 of the Black Rhino Range Expansion Project.
© WWF / Canon - Pam Sherriffs

Black Rhino and people

When people are focused on their own survival, conservation of biodiversity is not usually a priority. The Black Rhino Range Expansion Project aims to spread the benefits derived from conserving black rhino to people living in areas around project sites.
Already 30 people are being temporarily employed through project funds to fence the eMakhosini Ophathe Heritage Park which has been earmarked as a future Project site. All of the people were previously unemployed and have been selected in consultation with community leaders because of their level of need.

Instilling a culture of care and respect
Celiwe Shangase, one of the contracted workers, says: "Before, my husband and I were both unemployed. My little girl could not join her schoolmates in any activities because we had not paid her fees. Now, she is able to join in." They are also being empowered to develop their potential to compete as small private enterprises when the current fencing job is complete.

Partnerships which provide tangible benefits from conservation are essential in current political and economic climates of the developing world. But the project is not just looking at the bottom line. We are also working with educationalists to help instill a culture of care for our beautiful natural heritage and awareness of the importance of biodiversity.

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