Essential partnerships

WWF cannot achieve its goals alone. Partnerships are absolutely essential for driving change at the scale needed.

Our partners come in many shapes and sizes...

From companies seeking sustainable ways of doing business, to governments establishing protected areas.

From local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) delivering specific on-the-ground projects, to global NGOs coordinating mass mobilization actions.

From fishers testing more selective fishing gear, to consumers looking for greener food and products.

From international conventions driving better laws and policies, to local people managing and protecting their natural resources.

All have one thing in common – they make a very real difference.


Without them, much of our work would be infinitely more difficult, if not impossible, to carry out.

Our vital partners include:

Everyone, in fact, who has a stake in the health of our planet.

Including you.
 / ©: Juan Pratginestos / WWF-Canon
TAMAR biologist with fisherman, two partners in a WWF-Brazil project to determine the status and principal nesting sites of marine turtles in Brazil. Praia do Forte, Bahía, Brazil.
© Juan Pratginestos / WWF-Canon
TAMAR biologist with fisherman, two partners in a WWF-Brazil project to determine the status and principal nesting sites of marine turtles in Brazil. Praia do Forte, Bahía, Brazil.
Members of the  International Tiger Coalition stand in front of the mosaic / ©: WWF/A. Christy Williams
An example of successful online campaigning was the two-storey-high Tiger Mosaic created from photos of more than 26,000 people and unveiled in The Hague urging world leaders to end all trade in tigers.
© WWF/A. Christy Williams

An example of successful mass mobilization through cooperation between multiple NGOs was the 2-storey-high Tiger Mosaic created from photos of more than 26,000 people urging world leaders to end all trade in tigers.

Partner feature

Working with the Scouts
The Scouts are the world's largest youth movement with more than 28 million members in 160 countries.

They joined with WWF to lead thousands of community groups around the world and mobilize their supporters for Earth Hour, the global expression of a desire for serious and sustained action on climate change, on 28 March 2009.

What was described as "an opportunity to talk to your neighbours about the environment and climate change" was the latest expression of a partnership between the Scouts and WWF that goes back decades.

"We see that Scouts all over the world have a great interest in the environment and are leaders in their community," said Luc Panissod, Acting Secretary General of the Scouts Movement. "Earth Hour offers an opportunity for Scouts to demonstrate this commitment to tackling climate change and engage with their family and friends."

"The young are vitally concerned with the future and many are well aware that climate change is the greatest threat to the planet’s future. We are delighted that the Scouts are again working with us to secure the environment for generations to come," said James Leape, Director General of WWF International.

 / ©: WWF
Earth Hour
© WWF
 / ©: (C) Earth Hour
Scouts - Creating a better world
© (C) Earth Hour

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