Explore the stories of people and nature that we have achieved with your support

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And working with scientists, industry and government, we are using cutting-edge drone technology to protect critically endangered Māui dolphins.

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Much more needs to be done to protect the world’s most endangered dolphin.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

The west coast of New Zealand’s North Island is home to the world’s smallest and rarest dolphin: it’s thought that just 63 Māui dolphins survive.

Time is running out to save this taonga (the Māori word for treasure), and every individual counts. So we’ve helped bring together government, scientists, fishing companies and technology experts to help these dolphins thrive again.

The Māui Drone Project uses cutting-edge drone technology and artificial intelligence, developed by technology partners MĀUI63, that can find and follow Māui dolphins. We can now see which habitats they use and when, and find out about their breeding habits, with the technology even able to identify mother and calf pairs. 

With better information about the dolphins’ whereabouts, coupled with the commitment of government and fishing industry partners, we can work together to protect them from immediate threats like getting entangled in fishing gear, pollution and seismic testing – before it’s too late.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

With so few Māui dolphins left, their future remains precarious – but we’re determined to do whatever we can to help bring them back from the brink of extinction.

Māui dolphins are an important part of Aotearoa New Zealand’s natural heritage. But as a top-level predator in the ocean food chain, they also tell us about the health of the wider ocean ecosystem. If the dolphins are thriving, so are other marine species and habitats – and vice versa.  

While this pilot project is a great start, much more investment and commitment will be needed to address the many human-based threats to the Māui dolphins and to our moana (ocean).

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

The west coast of New Zealand’s North Island is home to the world’s smallest and rarest dolphin: it’s thought that just 63 Māui dolphins survive.

Time is running out to save this taonga (the Māori word for treasure), and every individual counts. So we’ve helped bring together government, scientists, fishing companies and technology experts to help these dolphins thrive again.

The Māui Drone Project uses cutting-edge drone technology and artificial intelligence, developed by technology partners MĀUI63, that can find and follow Māui dolphins. We can now see which habitats they use and when, and find out about their breeding habits, with the technology even able to identify mother and calf pairs. 

With better information about the dolphins’ whereabouts, coupled with the commitment of government and fishing industry partners, we can work together to protect them from immediate threats like getting entangled in fishing gear, pollution and seismic testing – before it’s too late.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

With so few Māui dolphins left, their future remains precarious – but we’re determined to do whatever we can to help bring them back from the brink of extinction.

Māui dolphins are an important part of Aotearoa New Zealand’s natural heritage. But as a top-level predator in the ocean food chain, they also tell us about the health of the wider ocean ecosystem. If the dolphins are thriving, so are other marine species and habitats – and vice versa.  

While this pilot project is a great start, much more investment and commitment will be needed to address the many human-based threats to the Māui dolphins and to our moana (ocean).

 

Together, we can change this

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We have worked with partners and communities to ensure Indigenous people like the Maasai in Kenya lead conservation efforts and areas.

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Many Indigenous peoples and local communities around the world continue to be denied their rightful say and role in the future of their ancestral territories.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS

The Maasai people have lived on the plains of Kenya and Tanzania for generations, herding their cattle with the seasons and celebrating their distinctive culture. Living in close harmony with nature, they are the guardians of some of the most spectacular wildlife habitats on the planet – a land where elephants and lions still roam free, and where vast herds of wildebeest, zebras and gazelles follow their ancient migration routes.

But the Maasai’s traditional way of life is changing. Human pressures such as unsustainable development are growing. Droughts  and unexpected environmental disasters are increasing as a result of climate change. People and wildlife are being brought into closer contact. And outdated conservation approaches that seek to exclude people from wildlife reserves have also caused conflict. 

With our partners, we’ve worked with communities in Kenya to create new community conserved areas – where communities are rightfully in charge of managing their land, wildlife and resources. In parallel, we are supporting them to improve habitat management and animal husbandry practices and strengthen their livelihoods, including through nature-based tourism. 

These areas are already showing positive results. Wildlife numbers are increasing and so have tourist revenues until the recent global pandemic lockdown – proving that both people and nature can thrive together here, as they always have.  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Indigenous peoples and local communities are the guardians of many of the world’s most important natural places. These “territories of life” contain about 40% of the land that’s still relatively unharmed by human activities, including some of the richest wildlife habitats as well as forests that store vast amounts of carbon.

Safeguarding these areas is vital for tackling the crises of nature loss and climate change. It also contributes to realizing our vision of a world where people and nature thrive and maintaining the rich cultural heritage of those who live there. Yet, they are under ever growing pressure from outside threats like unsustainable agriculture, logging, mining and infrastructure development.

In far too many cases, the rights of Indigenous peoples and local communities to decide the future of their ancestral lands aren’t recognized. They may face threats and violence, and their voices are often ignored or marginalized. Conservation initiatives, too, have sometimes failed to take account of their potential impacts on communities. 

We believe that conservation and human rights go hand in hand. Around the world, we’re supporting Indigenous peoples and local communities to continue managing their lands sustainably – and to ensure their voices are heard and their rights are recognized. But we know there are still many complex challenges to be overcome. 

Together, we can change this

The Maasai people have lived on the plains of Kenya and Tanzania for generations, herding their cattle with the seasons and celebrating their distinctive culture. Living in close harmony with nature, they are the guardians of some of the most spectacular wildlife habitats on the planet – a land where elephants and lions still roam free, and where vast herds of wildebeest, zebras and gazelles follow their ancient migration routes.

But the Maasai’s traditional way of life is changing. Human pressures such as unsustainable development are growing. Droughts  and unexpected environmental disasters are increasing as a result of climate change. People and wildlife are being brought into closer contact. And outdated conservation approaches that seek to exclude people from wildlife reserves have also caused conflict. 

With our partners, we’ve worked with communities in Kenya to create new community conserved areas – where communities are rightfully in charge of managing their land, wildlife and resources. In parallel, we are supporting them to improve habitat management and animal husbandry practices and strengthen their livelihoods, including through nature-based tourism. 

These areas are already showing positive results. Wildlife numbers are increasing and so have tourist revenues until the recent global pandemic lockdown – proving that both people and nature can thrive together here, as they always have.  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Indigenous peoples and local communities are the guardians of many of the world’s most important natural places. These “territories of life” contain about 40% of the land that’s still relatively unharmed by human activities, including some of the richest wildlife habitats as well as forests that store vast amounts of carbon.

Safeguarding these areas is vital for tackling the crises of nature loss and climate change. It also contributes to realizing our vision of a world where people and nature thrive and maintaining the rich cultural heritage of those who live there. Yet, they are under ever growing pressure from outside threats like unsustainable agriculture, logging, mining and infrastructure development.

In far too many cases, the rights of Indigenous peoples and local communities to decide the future of their ancestral lands aren’t recognized. They may face threats and violence, and their voices are often ignored or marginalized. Conservation initiatives, too, have sometimes failed to take account of their potential impacts on communities. 

We believe that conservation and human rights go hand in hand. Around the world, we’re supporting Indigenous peoples and local communities to continue managing their lands sustainably – and to ensure their voices are heard and their rights are recognized. But we know there are still many complex challenges to be overcome. 

Together, we can change this

Support our work

Help build a world where people and nature thrive

Donate

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We helped bring the Iberian lynx back from the brink of extinction in southwestern Europe, with its population increasing from less than 100 in 2002 to more than 1,100 today.

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We must triple Iberian lynx numbers to ensure its long-term survival.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

The Iberian lynx was once found throughout Spain and Portugal as well as in southern France. But during the 20th century, habitat loss, hunting and declining prey populations pushed the species close to extinction. By 2002, fewer than 100 individuals remained in just two populations in Andalusia.

Since then, we’ve worked with regional governments, NGOs, businesses and landowners to save this iconic big cat. Initially, our focus was on stabilizing and gradually expanding the two existing populations by managing their habitat and increasing the number of rabbits, their main prey species.

The second big challenge was to expand the lynx’s range by creating new populations. We helped develop a breeding programme and test the most effective ways to reintroduce captive-bred cats into the wild. Two new populations were created in Andalusia, followed by two reintroductions in Castilla-La Mancha, one in Extremadura and one in Portugal. We’ve also been working on reducing threats such as road accidents and poaching.

The results have been spectacular: the population has increased more than tenfold, reaching 1,111 individuals in 2020.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

The comeback of the Iberian lynx is one of the great conservation stories – but it isn’t over yet. The species is still classified as endangered – to ensure its long-term survival, we need around 750 breeding females. 

That would equate to a total population of around 3,500. So in other words, we need to triple the current numbers, which would mean creating eight new populations. 

If we’re able to keep up our conservation efforts, we believe this can be achieved by 2040 – securing the future of one of Europe’s top predators.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

The Iberian lynx was once found throughout Spain and Portugal as well as in southern France. But during the 20th century, habitat loss, hunting and declining prey populations pushed the species close to extinction. By 2002, fewer than 100 individuals remained in just two populations in Andalusia.

Since then, we’ve worked with regional governments, NGOs, businesses and landowners to save this iconic big cat. Initially, our focus was on stabilizing and gradually expanding the two existing populations by managing their habitat and increasing the number of rabbits, their main prey species.

The second big challenge was to expand the lynx’s range by creating new populations. We helped develop a breeding programme and test the most effective ways to reintroduce captive-bred cats into the wild. Two new populations were created in Andalusia, followed by two reintroductions in Castilla-La Mancha, one in Extremadura and one in Portugal. We’ve also been working on reducing threats such as road accidents and poaching.

The results have been spectacular: the population has increased more than tenfold, reaching 1,111 individuals in 2020.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

The comeback of the Iberian lynx is one of the great conservation stories – but it isn’t over yet. The species is still classified as endangered – to ensure its long-term survival, we need around 750 breeding females. 

That would equate to a total population of around 3,500. So in other words, we need to triple the current numbers, which would mean creating eight new populations. 

If we’re able to keep up our conservation efforts, we believe this can be achieved by 2040 – securing the future of one of Europe’s top predators.

 

Together, we can change this

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We’ve protected the magnificent monarch butterfly migration by reducing illegal logging in its core overwintering grounds in Mexico.

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The expansion of avocado plantations in Mexico and the reduction of breeding habitats in the US and Canada remain a threat to this natural phenomenon.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

At the end of every summer in the Northern Hemisphere, monarch butterflies embark on a journey of nearly 2,800 miles, winging their way from Canada and the US to central Mexico. Arriving in early November, they congregate in their millions on oyamel fir trees, where the microclimate is just right for hibernation. When spring arrives, mating begins and they head back north.

While monarchs are not endangered, their marvellous migration is at risk. Because they cluster in an area of just a few square miles, any damage to their forest habitat has serious consequences.

In 2000, we supported the expansion of Mexico’s vital Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve. And ever since, we’ve been working with local communities and other partners to protect the forest and maintain this magnificent spectacle. Crucially, we want to make sure local people see the benefit – whether that’s working as tourist guides, or selling forest products like mushrooms without any impact on the butterflies.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

While a reduction in the monarch’s breeding habitat in the US and Canada remains a concern, a new threat in Mexico is avocado production. Avocado demand in the US is soaring, and the vast majority comes from the state of Michoacán, where monarch butterflies spend the winter. 

Illegal deforestation for avocado plantations is on the rise. Between March 2019 and March 2020, 20.26 hectares of monarch habitat suffered from degradation – four times more than in the previous 12 months.

We’ll continue to work with local communities in Mexico to ensure they benefit from protecting the monarch butterfly’s hibernation forests. And we remain hopeful that we will secure the future of this extraordinary natural phenomenon.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

At the end of every summer in the Northern Hemisphere, monarch butterflies embark on a journey of nearly 2,800 miles, winging their way from Canada and the US to central Mexico. Arriving in early November, they congregate in their millions on oyamel fir trees, where the microclimate is just right for hibernation. When spring arrives, mating begins and they head back north.

While monarchs are not endangered, their marvellous migration is at risk. Because they cluster in an area of just a few square miles, any damage to their forest habitat has serious consequences.

In 2000, we supported the expansion of Mexico’s vital Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve. And ever since, we’ve been working with local communities and other partners to protect the forest and maintain this magnificent spectacle. Crucially, we want to make sure local people see the benefit – whether that’s working as tourist guides, or selling forest products like mushrooms without any impact on the butterflies.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

While a reduction in the monarch’s breeding habitat in the US and Canada remains a concern, a new threat in Mexico is avocado production. Avocado demand in the US is soaring, and the vast majority comes from the state of Michoacán, where monarch butterflies spend the winter. 

Illegal deforestation for avocado plantations is on the rise. Between March 2019 and March 2020, 20.26 hectares of monarch habitat suffered from degradation – four times more than in the previous 12 months.

We’ll continue to work with local communities in Mexico to ensure they benefit from protecting the monarch butterfly’s hibernation forests. And we remain hopeful that we will secure the future of this extraordinary natural phenomenon.

 

Together, we can change this

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Help build a world where people and nature thrive

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We are working with over 30 major cities around the world to stop plastic leaking into nature.

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Many urban areas, responsible for an estimated 60% of all ocean plastic pollution, have yet to take action.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

Our ocean contains an estimated 300 million tonnes of plastic. It kills marine life, smothers our beaches and even makes its way into the food we eat. But the world is finally waking up to this enormous problem. 

So far, more than 30 cities, from Thailand to Tunisia, have committed to take action to stop plastic pollution – and we’re aiming to get 1,000 plastic-smart cities to join the movement by 2030. This is vitally important as about 60% of plastic in the ocean comes from urban areas. 

The growing global movement for change is leading to progress in other ways too. Over 65 governments have pledged their support for a global treaty to prevent plastic pollution, after more than 2 million people around the world signed our petition.

With consumers calling for action, businesses are getting onboard too. More than 500 organizations, including companies responsible for more than 20% of all plastic packaging, have signed the WWF-backed New Plastics Economy Global Commitment to eliminate plastic waste. And through our ReSource: Plastic initiative, we’re helping them turn ambition into action. 
 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 


Despite these encouraging signs, a truck load of plastic is still being dumped into the ocean every single minute.

By the end of the decade, we’re likely to be producing 40% more plastic than we do today. And without urgent action, there could be more plastic than fish in the ocean by 2050. 

One of the most urgent issues right now is the need to tackle the threat of lost or discarded plastic fishing gear. So-called “ghost gear” is the deadliest type of plastic debris, trapping and entangling marine mammals, turtles, seabirds and sharks, as well as important fish stocks.

And there are other critical environmental issues linked to our use of plastic – from the way plastic production currently accounts for around 6% of global greenhouse gas emissions to the air pollution caused by burning plastic waste. 

These are challenging problems but we are confident that the co-ordinated actions of businesses, cities and governments, together with hundreds of millions of people making changes in their own lifestyles, can lead to no plastic in nature by 2030. 

Together, we can change this.

Our ocean contains an estimated 300 million tonnes of plastic. It kills marine life, smothers our beaches and even makes its way into the food we eat. But the world is finally waking up to this enormous problem. 

So far, more than 30 cities, from Thailand to Tunisia, have committed to take action to stop plastic pollution – and we’re aiming to get 1,000 plastic-smart cities to join the movement by 2030. This is vitally important as about 60% of plastic in the ocean comes from urban areas. 

The growing global movement for change is leading to progress in other ways too. Over 65 governments have pledged their support for a global treaty to prevent plastic pollution, after more than 2 million people around the world signed our petition.

With consumers calling for action, businesses are getting onboard too. More than 500 organizations, including companies responsible for more than 20% of all plastic packaging, have signed the WWF-backed New Plastics Economy Global Commitment to eliminate plastic waste. And through our ReSource: Plastic initiative, we’re helping them turn ambition into action. 
 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 


Despite these encouraging signs, a truck load of plastic is still being dumped into the ocean every single minute.

By the end of the decade, we’re likely to be producing 40% more plastic than we do today. And without urgent action, there could be more plastic than fish in the ocean by 2050. 

One of the most urgent issues right now is the need to tackle the threat of lost or discarded plastic fishing gear. So-called “ghost gear” is the deadliest type of plastic debris, trapping and entangling marine mammals, turtles, seabirds and sharks, as well as important fish stocks.

And there are other critical environmental issues linked to our use of plastic – from the way plastic production currently accounts for around 6% of global greenhouse gas emissions to the air pollution caused by burning plastic waste. 

These are challenging problems but we are confident that the co-ordinated actions of businesses, cities and governments, together with hundreds of millions of people making changes in their own lifestyles, can lead to no plastic in nature by 2030. 

Together, we can change this.

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TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS

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And with communities and government, we helped establish the world's largest tropical rainforest national park covering 4.3 million hectares of the Colombian Amazon.

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Around the world, we're still losing 10 million hectares of forest every year.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS

In the heart of the Colombian Amazon, Serranía del Chiribiquete National Park is one of the most pristine areas of tropical rainforest on the planet. 

It’s home to almost 3,000 species of animals and plants, including vulnerable wildlife like lowland tapirs, giant otters, giant anteaters, woolly monkeys, river dolphins and jaguars. An amazing diversity that’s explained by its unique location – where the Amazon meets the neighbouring ecoregions of the Andes, Orinoco and Guyanas. 

Chiribiquete is also vitally important to local indigenous communities, some of whom remain uncontacted or live in voluntary isolation. The park’s archaeological treasures include ancient rock art – 50 murals made up of more than 70,000 ancient paintings, some over 20,000 years old, can be found across the region’s many tepuis, table-top rock formations that rise out of the dense forest. The isolation of these imposing towers also means that many of the plants and animals living in them are found nowhere else on Earth.

In 2018, after years of campaigning by WWF and others, the Colombian government increased the size of the national park by more than half. At 4.3 million hectares – the size of Denmark – it’s now the largest area of protected rainforest in the world. Chiribiquete has also been recognized as a World Heritage site, helping to safeguard its natural and cultural riches for future generations.

We’re now working with communities, government and other partners to make sure the national park is properly looked after. And, together, we’re working to create a network of well-managed and well-funded protected areas right across Colombia.

 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Every year, an area of forest more than twice the size of Chiribiquete National Park is destroyed. Although many governments, businesses and others have committed to end deforestation, 10 million hectares of forest are still being lost each year – that’s an area the size of a football pitch every second. 

Agriculture is the single biggest driver, particularly the production of beef, palm oil and soya, with mining, poorly managed logging, road building and other development also destroying forest habitats.

Deforestation threatens the survival of countless species and the millions of people who live in and around forests. It also has global impacts, intensifying climate change and increasing the risk of pandemics like Covid-19 by increasing human contact with wildlife and the diseases they carry. 

Governments, communities, businesses and many others, including WWF, all have a part to play in turning things around. We need to help people better understand the many vital services forests provide to all of us, no matter where we live, from clean water to healthy soils. We need to halt deforestation, better protect and sustainably manage the forests that remain and restore forest landscapes. 

Together, we can change this.

In the heart of the Colombian Amazon, Serranía del Chiribiquete National Park is one of the most pristine areas of tropical rainforest on the planet. 

It’s home to almost 3,000 species of animals and plants, including vulnerable wildlife like lowland tapirs, giant otters, giant anteaters, woolly monkeys, river dolphins and jaguars. An amazing diversity that’s explained by its unique location – where the Amazon meets the neighbouring ecoregions of the Andes, Orinoco and Guyanas. 

Chiribiquete is also vitally important to local indigenous communities, some of whom remain uncontacted or live in voluntary isolation. The park’s archaeological treasures include ancient rock art – 50 murals made up of more than 70,000 ancient paintings, some over 20,000 years old, can be found across the region’s many tepuis, table-top rock formations that rise out of the dense forest. The isolation of these imposing towers also means that many of the plants and animals living in them are found nowhere else on Earth.

In 2018, after years of campaigning by WWF and others, the Colombian government increased the size of the national park by more than half. At 4.3 million hectares – the size of Denmark – it’s now the largest area of protected rainforest in the world. Chiribiquete has also been recognized as a World Heritage site, helping to safeguard its natural and cultural riches for future generations.

We’re now working with communities, government and other partners to make sure the national park is properly looked after. And, together, we’re working to create a network of well-managed and well-funded protected areas right across Colombia.

 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Every year, an area of forest more than twice the size of Chiribiquete National Park is destroyed. Although many governments, businesses and others have committed to end deforestation, 10 million hectares of forest are still being lost each year – that’s an area the size of a football pitch every second. 

Agriculture is the single biggest driver, particularly the production of beef, palm oil and soya, with mining, poorly managed logging, road building and other development also destroying forest habitats.

Deforestation threatens the survival of countless species and the millions of people who live in and around forests. It also has global impacts, intensifying climate change and increasing the risk of pandemics like Covid-19 by increasing human contact with wildlife and the diseases they carry. 

Governments, communities, businesses and many others, including WWF, all have a part to play in turning things around. We need to help people better understand the many vital services forests provide to all of us, no matter where we live, from clean water to healthy soils. We need to halt deforestation, better protect and sustainably manage the forests that remain and restore forest landscapes. 

Together, we can change this.

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Donate

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The financial sector is changing for the better so that investments restore rather than destroy nature.

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Sustainable investments still only represent about 36% of the global financial market.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

Money makes the world go round… and it will also make or break the future of our planet.

Imagine if banks, insurance companies and other financial institutions, as well as governments, stopped supporting projects and businesses that fuel climate change, pollute the environment and drive the destruction of nature – and instead put their money into financing the solutions.

That’s what we’re aiming for – and we’re starting to see some real progress. In 2019, for example, an alliance of the world’s largest pension funds and insurers – who now manage assets worth more than US$5.1 trillion – committed to align their portfolios with net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Members of the Net-Zero Asset Owner Alliance have pledged to use their collective influence to transform the businesses they invest in and support a transition to a low-carbon society.

It’s just one of a number of initiatives we are involved in that aim to use the power of finance for the good of the planet. Increasingly, financial institutions are realizing that environmental threats like climate change, deforestation and water scarcity present major financial risks. But they’re also recognizing that there are huge opportunities to invest in areas like renewable energy, energy efficiency, sustainable agriculture and nature-based solutions to a variety of global challenges.  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Sustainable investments are worth more than US$30 trillion globally according to the latest data. That’s a vast figure, and it’s grown rapidly in the last few years. But it still accounts for just 35.5% of the total investments managed by professional financial institutions

In other words, it’s more likely than not that the personal pension funds of millions of people are supporting activities that will leave the planet poorer by the time they retire. While a growing number of financial institutions are being more responsible, companies can still raise capital to drill for oil in the Arctic, mine minerals in natural World Heritage sites or build dams across free-flowing rivers.

Ultimately, our whole economy depends on nature. The services nature provides – from fertile soil and pollination, to flood defence and air purification – are worth US$44 trillion to the global economy each year. We face huge economic costs and lost value over the coming years, unless the financial system and the businesses it supports recognize the true value of nature.

Together, we can change this.

Money makes the world go round… and it will also make or break the future of our planet.

Imagine if banks, insurance companies and other financial institutions, as well as governments, stopped supporting projects and businesses that fuel climate change, pollute the environment and drive the destruction of nature – and instead put their money into financing the solutions.

That’s what we’re aiming for – and we’re starting to see some real progress. In 2019, for example, an alliance of the world’s largest pension funds and insurers – who now manage assets worth more than US$5.1 trillion – committed to align their portfolios with net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Members of the Net-Zero Asset Owner Alliance have pledged to use their collective influence to transform the businesses they invest in and support a transition to a low-carbon society.

It’s just one of a number of initiatives we are involved in that aim to use the power of finance for the good of the planet. Increasingly, financial institutions are realizing that environmental threats like climate change, deforestation and water scarcity present major financial risks. But they’re also recognizing that there are huge opportunities to invest in areas like renewable energy, energy efficiency, sustainable agriculture and nature-based solutions to a variety of global challenges.  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Sustainable investments are worth more than US$30 trillion globally according to the latest data. That’s a vast figure, and it’s grown rapidly in the last few years. But it still accounts for just 35.5% of the total investments managed by professional financial institutions

In other words, it’s more likely than not that the personal pension funds of millions of people are supporting activities that will leave the planet poorer by the time they retire. While a growing number of financial institutions are being more responsible, companies can still raise capital to drill for oil in the Arctic, mine minerals in natural World Heritage sites or build dams across free-flowing rivers.

Ultimately, our whole economy depends on nature. The services nature provides – from fertile soil and pollination, to flood defence and air purification – are worth US$44 trillion to the global economy each year. We face huge economic costs and lost value over the coming years, unless the financial system and the businesses it supports recognize the true value of nature.

Together, we can change this.

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We helped secure water flows in 295 basins across Mexico, safeguarding water supplies for nature and for 45 million people.

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Rivers across the world continue to be drained, dammed and diverted.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

As in many countries, water shortages are a real threat in Mexico. As human populations grow and climate change increases droughts and disrupts rainfall patterns, water resources are coming under ever greater stress.

So in 2018, with our support, the country took a revolutionary step. The president signed a decree creating “water reserves” in 295 river basins across the country. 

That means that a scientifically calculated proportion of the water in these river basins is set aside for nature as well as to provide water for drinking and the other essential needs for local people. In total, the reserves cover 55% of Mexico’s surface water, and should guarantee freshwater supplies for 45 million people for the next half-century.

We played a key role in working out how much water needs to flow through each one to sustain nature and meet the needs of local people. This will allow water to be managed wisely and fairly, now and in the future. 

The reserves will also help to safeguard Mexico’s remaining free-flowing rivers, like the Usumacinta, the largest and most biodiverse river in Central America. A water reserve now protects 93% of the Usumacinta’s water, nourishing communities, forests and local wildlife like the iconic jaguar. 

 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Rivers provide drinking water for 2 billion people globally, and are vital for the food and livelihoods of hundreds of millions by providing water for irrigation, sustaining freshwater fisheries, and transporting nutrients to some of the world’s most important agricultural regions and sediment to keep densely populated deltas above the rising seas.

But our rivers are in trouble. Hydropower dams disrupt their natural flow and block the movement of migratory species. Farming, factories and cities take more water than rivers can spare, and pollute what remains. Only a third of rivers over 1,000km long remain free-flowing, and some run dry before they even reach the sea. 

It’s hardly surprising therefore that populations of freshwater mammals, birds, reptiles, fish and amphibians have fallen by a staggering 84% since 1970. 

Around the world, many more people must urgently recognize the true value of rivers and the threats they face. We desperately need their support for our ongoing efforts alongside governments, businesses, communities and scientists.

We’re working to improve the way rivers and other freshwater environments are managed. We’re challenging destructive developments like poorly sited hydropower dams, and demonstrating sustainable alternatives. And we’re helping to bring rivers back to health by removing dams and other artificial structures, restoring wetlands and floodplains, and protecting threatened species like river dolphins and sturgeon.

As in many countries, water shortages are a real threat in Mexico. As human populations grow and climate change increases droughts and disrupts rainfall patterns, water resources are coming under ever greater stress.

So in 2018, with our support, the country took a revolutionary step. The president signed a decree creating “water reserves” in 295 river basins across the country. 

That means that a scientifically calculated proportion of the water in these river basins is set aside for nature as well as to provide water for drinking and the other essential needs for local people. In total, the reserves cover 55% of Mexico’s surface water, and should guarantee freshwater supplies for 45 million people for the next half-century.

We played a key role in working out how much water needs to flow through each one to sustain nature and meet the needs of local people. This will allow water to be managed wisely and fairly, now and in the future. 

The reserves will also help to safeguard Mexico’s remaining free-flowing rivers, like the Usumacinta, the largest and most biodiverse river in Central America. A water reserve now protects 93% of the Usumacinta’s water, nourishing communities, forests and local wildlife like the iconic jaguar. 

 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Rivers provide drinking water for 2 billion people globally, and are vital for the food and livelihoods of hundreds of millions by providing water for irrigation, sustaining freshwater fisheries, and transporting nutrients to some of the world’s most important agricultural regions and sediment to keep densely populated deltas above the rising seas.

But our rivers are in trouble. Hydropower dams disrupt their natural flow and block the movement of migratory species. Farming, factories and cities take more water than rivers can spare, and pollute what remains. Only a third of rivers over 1,000km long remain free-flowing, and some run dry before they even reach the sea. 

It’s hardly surprising therefore that populations of freshwater mammals, birds, reptiles, fish and amphibians have fallen by a staggering 84% since 1970. 

Around the world, many more people must urgently recognize the true value of rivers and the threats they face. We desperately need their support for our ongoing efforts alongside governments, businesses, communities and scientists.

We’re working to improve the way rivers and other freshwater environments are managed. We’re challenging destructive developments like poorly sited hydropower dams, and demonstrating sustainable alternatives. And we’re helping to bring rivers back to health by removing dams and other artificial structures, restoring wetlands and floodplains, and protecting threatened species like river dolphins and sturgeon.

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China, Singapore* and other governments have banned the ivory trade.

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A vast array of wildlife, valued at up to US$23 billion a year, is still being illegally traded.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS

Significant progress has been made in recent decades to end the slaughter of around 20,000 elephants each year for the ivory trade. But much more needs to be done if we are to prevent the extinction of these magnificent creatures. 

Thanks to the efforts of WWF and many others, international trade in ivory was banned way back in 1989. But many countries continued to sell ivory within their own borders. And as long as there’s a market for ivory, unscrupulous criminals will find a way of meeting the demand.

As the poaching crisis in Africa escalated, we stepped up our efforts to highlight the scale of  the problem. And we had a major breakthrough at the end of 2016 when China, the world’s largest ivory market, announced that it would ban all domestic ivory sales within a year. 

We anticipate Hong Kong and Singapore, two other major ivory markets in the region, will enact bans in 2021. And other countries like the UK and the US have also imposed ivory bans, including restrictions on ivory antiques – which can be used to launder ivory from recently poached elephants.

While there’s still work to do to close down other major ivory markets, particularly in Southeast Asia, the bans send a clear signal that buying ivory isn’t acceptable. 
 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Although recent data show a decline in African elephant poaching trends, they are not out of trouble yet. And they’re far from the only species threatened by the illegal wildlife trade. Rhino poaching has risen to horrific levels fuelled by demand for their horns. Tigers and leopards are killed for their skins and other body parts. Hundreds of thousands of pangolins are trafficked every year for their scales and meat. Illegal timber harvesting devastates forests. In total, more than 7,000 species in over 120 countries are threatened by the illegal wildlife trade. 

Wildlife crime is a lucrative business, valued at up to US$23 billion a year, and run by organized criminal networks. Governments are finally waking up to the severity of the threat, and the last few years have brought numerous national and international resolutions, initiatives and commitments, many of which we’ve been closely involved in. 

But more action is urgently needed to tackle the illegal wildlife trade. We need increased efforts to convince consumers to reject buying wildlife products, more support for the communities who live alongside endangered wildlife and better targeted efforts to bring global criminal networks to justice. 

Together, we can change this.


*Singapore ban starts September 2021

Significant progress has been made in recent decades to end the slaughter of around 20,000 elephants each year for the ivory trade. But much more needs to be done if we are to prevent the extinction of these magnificent creatures. 

Thanks to the efforts of WWF and many others, international trade in ivory was banned way back in 1989. But many countries continued to sell ivory within their own borders. And as long as there’s a market for ivory, unscrupulous criminals will find a way of meeting the demand.

As the poaching crisis in Africa escalated, we stepped up our efforts to highlight the scale of  the problem. And we had a major breakthrough at the end of 2016 when China, the world’s largest ivory market, announced that it would ban all domestic ivory sales within a year. 

We anticipate Hong Kong and Singapore, two other major ivory markets in the region, will enact bans in 2021. And other countries like the UK and the US have also imposed ivory bans, including restrictions on ivory antiques – which can be used to launder ivory from recently poached elephants.

While there’s still work to do to close down other major ivory markets, particularly in Southeast Asia, the bans send a clear signal that buying ivory isn’t acceptable. 
 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Although recent data show a decline in African elephant poaching trends, they are not out of trouble yet. And they’re far from the only species threatened by the illegal wildlife trade. Rhino poaching has risen to horrific levels fuelled by demand for their horns. Tigers and leopards are killed for their skins and other body parts. Hundreds of thousands of pangolins are trafficked every year for their scales and meat. Illegal timber harvesting devastates forests. In total, more than 7,000 species in over 120 countries are threatened by the illegal wildlife trade. 

Wildlife crime is a lucrative business, valued at up to US$23 billion a year, and run by organized criminal networks. Governments are finally waking up to the severity of the threat, and the last few years have brought numerous national and international resolutions, initiatives and commitments, many of which we’ve been closely involved in. 

But more action is urgently needed to tackle the illegal wildlife trade. We need increased efforts to convince consumers to reject buying wildlife products, more support for the communities who live alongside endangered wildlife and better targeted efforts to bring global criminal networks to justice. 

Together, we can change this.


*Singapore ban starts September 2021

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And the efforts of governments and communities, wild tiger numbers are slowly increasing for the first time in a century.

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Poaching and habitat loss remain a constant threat to their future.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

Just 10 years ago, wild tigers were heading towards extinction. From perhaps 100,000 at the beginning of the 20th century, tiger numbers had hit an all-time low of an estimated 3,200 – only surviving in small pockets of their historic range, which once spanned across the grasslands and forests of the Asian continent. But things have started to turn around. 

In 2010, the governments of all 13 tiger-range countries made a “TX2” commitment to double wild tigers by 2022 – the Chinese Year of the Tiger. A global recovery plan followed and WWF, together with individuals, businesses, communities, governments, and other conservation partners, have worked tirelessly to turn this grand ambition into reality. 

Since then, tigers have made an incredible comeback in Bhutan, China, India, Nepal and Russia. Numbers are increasing in many landscapes and populations are even moving into new areas, which is also great news for the many species and millions of human beings who rely on healthy tiger habitats.  

This success is the result of many efforts. Investing in protected areas. Creating best-practice global conservation standards (CA|TS) for managing tiger habitats, which are being implemented in over 125 sites. Reducing poaching and challenging the trade in tiger body parts, from changing consumer behaviour and tackling criminal activities to helping phase out of tiger farms. And supporting the crucial role played by communities in protecting tigers.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Unfortunately, the many historic threats to the tiger, ranging from habitat destruction and fragmentation to the illegal wildlife trade, have not gone away. And these are having particularly harmful impacts in the countries of Southeast Asia.

Snaring, in particular, is a growing menace in this region to tigers and other wildlife, including the prey they rely on for food. For instance, in one of Southeast Asia’s most important remaining tiger landscapes, Belum-Temengor in Malaysia, the tiger population declined by 50% from 2009-2018 largely due to snaring. 

 

We know the solutions that can turn things around. More resources to safeguard wildlife in protected areas; stronger laws and enforcement to challenge the illegal wildlife trade; improved resources to stop poaching; and increased education and awareness raising to tackle consumer demand for tiger parts. 

Together, we can change this.

Just 10 years ago, wild tigers were heading towards extinction. From perhaps 100,000 at the beginning of the 20th century, tiger numbers had hit an all-time low of an estimated 3,200 – only surviving in small pockets of their historic range, which once spanned across the grasslands and forests of the Asian continent. But things have started to turn around. 

In 2010, the governments of all 13 tiger-range countries made a “TX2” commitment to double wild tigers by 2022 – the Chinese Year of the Tiger. A global recovery plan followed and WWF, together with individuals, businesses, communities, governments, and other conservation partners, have worked tirelessly to turn this grand ambition into reality. 

Since then, tigers have made an incredible comeback in Bhutan, China, India, Nepal and Russia. Numbers are increasing in many landscapes and populations are even moving into new areas, which is also great news for the many species and millions of human beings who rely on healthy tiger habitats.  

This success is the result of many efforts. Investing in protected areas. Creating best-practice global conservation standards (CA|TS) for managing tiger habitats, which are being implemented in over 125 sites. Reducing poaching and challenging the trade in tiger body parts, from changing consumer behaviour and tackling criminal activities to helping phase out of tiger farms. And supporting the crucial role played by communities in protecting tigers.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Unfortunately, the many historic threats to the tiger, ranging from habitat destruction and fragmentation to the illegal wildlife trade, have not gone away. And these are having particularly harmful impacts in the countries of Southeast Asia.

Snaring, in particular, is a growing menace in this region to tigers and other wildlife, including the prey they rely on for food. For instance, in one of Southeast Asia’s most important remaining tiger landscapes, Belum-Temengor in Malaysia, the tiger population declined by 50% from 2009-2018 largely due to snaring. 

 

We know the solutions that can turn things around. More resources to safeguard wildlife in protected areas; stronger laws and enforcement to challenge the illegal wildlife trade; improved resources to stop poaching; and increased education and awareness raising to tackle consumer demand for tiger parts. 

Together, we can change this.

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We worked with the Belize government to ban offshore oil exploration around its fragile barrier reefs.

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Coral reefs around the world remain vulnerable to rising sea temperatures, pollution and coastal development.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

The barrier reef off the coast of Belize is the largest coral reef in the northern hemisphere, and second only to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. From underwater corals and mangrove forests to sandy “cayes” and the Great Blue Hole, it’s one of the wonders of the natural world and a UNESCO natural World Heritage site.

The reef is home to hundreds of species, including sea turtles, dolphins, rays and manatees. And it’s vital for people too, providing food and income for nearly 200,000 people. It brings in US$200 million per year in tourism revenue, and protects people and property along the coast from storms. 

So when in 2016 the Belize government announced plans to allow offshore oil exploration close to the reef, we sprang into action. As well as the disruption caused by seismic testing, an oil spill would be catastrophic for the reef’s rich marine life and the people who depend upon it.

We rallied a massive global outcry. More than 450,000 people signed a petition calling on the government to protect the reef. 

And it listened. The government announced a permanent ban on oil exploration around the reef. Now we’re working with them to ensure future generations continue to benefit from Belize’s marine treasures.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Coral reefs like Belize’s are among the richest ecosystems on the planet. They occupy just 0.1% of the world’s ocean, but support a quarter of all marine species and provide food and livelihoods for hundreds of millions of people.  

Yet we’ve already lost around half the world’s shallow water coral reefs, and many of those that remain are in poor health. Overfishing, destructive coastal development and pollution from land and sea are all major threats, and we’re working around the world to tackle these.

But it’s climate change that poses the biggest risk. Coral reefs can’t survive if the water temperature is too hot, and we’re already seeing “coral bleaching” across vast areas because of heat stress. At current rates of warming, scientists predict that most coral reefs will die over the next few decades. 

As well as doing everything we can to limit a global temperature increase, we need to help coral reefs adapt to the impacts of climate change. Through the Coral Reef Rescue Initiative, we’re working with communities, governments and other partners to safeguard reefs that have the best chance of surviving in a warming ocean – identifying both on-the-ground and global policy action. 

Together, we can change this.

The barrier reef off the coast of Belize is the largest coral reef in the northern hemisphere, and second only to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. From underwater corals and mangrove forests to sandy “cayes” and the Great Blue Hole, it’s one of the wonders of the natural world and a UNESCO natural World Heritage site.

The reef is home to hundreds of species, including sea turtles, dolphins, rays and manatees. And it’s vital for people too, providing food and income for nearly 200,000 people. It brings in US$200 million per year in tourism revenue, and protects people and property along the coast from storms. 

So when in 2016 the Belize government announced plans to allow offshore oil exploration close to the reef, we sprang into action. As well as the disruption caused by seismic testing, an oil spill would be catastrophic for the reef’s rich marine life and the people who depend upon it.

We rallied a massive global outcry. More than 450,000 people signed a petition calling on the government to protect the reef. 

And it listened. The government announced a permanent ban on oil exploration around the reef. Now we’re working with them to ensure future generations continue to benefit from Belize’s marine treasures.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Coral reefs like Belize’s are among the richest ecosystems on the planet. They occupy just 0.1% of the world’s ocean, but support a quarter of all marine species and provide food and livelihoods for hundreds of millions of people.  

Yet we’ve already lost around half the world’s shallow water coral reefs, and many of those that remain are in poor health. Overfishing, destructive coastal development and pollution from land and sea are all major threats, and we’re working around the world to tackle these.

But it’s climate change that poses the biggest risk. Coral reefs can’t survive if the water temperature is too hot, and we’re already seeing “coral bleaching” across vast areas because of heat stress. At current rates of warming, scientists predict that most coral reefs will die over the next few decades. 

As well as doing everything we can to limit a global temperature increase, we need to help coral reefs adapt to the impacts of climate change. Through the Coral Reef Rescue Initiative, we’re working with communities, governments and other partners to safeguard reefs that have the best chance of surviving in a warming ocean – identifying both on-the-ground and global policy action. 

Together, we can change this.

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And with communities and governments in East and Central Africa, mountain gorilla numbers have increased by 25% in 10 years.

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Wildlife populations around the world* have seen an alarming 68% decline on average in the past five decades.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

Mountain gorillas are found in only two places – the Virunga mountains, where the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Uganda meet, and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda. Just over 1,000 remain in the wild but the outlook for these gentle giants looks much brighter than it did a few decades ago.

In 1991, we set up the International Gorilla Conservation Programme (IGCP) with our partners at the African Wildlife Foundation and Flora and Fauna International. And by working together with local communities and the governments of the three countries, we’ve managed to reverse the decline in mountain gorilla numbers.

Regular censuses show both populations steadily increasing. The Virunga population now numbers over 600 individuals, up from 480 in 2010, while the Bwindi population grew from around 400 in 2010 to 459 at the latest count in 2019.   

Working with local people is at the heart of our gorilla conservation work – and we’re supporting communities with alternative sources of fuel, water and livelihoods to take pressure off the gorilla’s forest habitat.  Gorilla tourism, although currently impacted by the global pandemic lockdown,  provides local people with a strong incentive to protect the species – providing them with an important source of jobs and income, as well as revenue for national governments. 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Mountain gorillas are the only great apes whose numbers are increasing. Populations of chimpanzees, bonobos, orang-utans and the other gorilla sub-species are all declining as a result of the actions of their close relative: Homo sapiens.

It’s the same story across all groups of species. The Living Planet Index, which tracks trends in almost 21,000 populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fishes, shows an average decline of 68% since 1970. In other words, we’ve lost almost two-thirds of the world’s wildlife in less than half a century.

Dedicated conservation initiatives, like the IGCP’s efforts to save mountain gorillas, can make a difference for particular species and populations, and remain a core part of our work. But to save the world’s wildlife, we need to address the underlying threats. 

Habitat loss and degradation, overexploitation, climate change, invasive species and pollution are the main causes of species decline – and they’re all a result of human actions. In particular, the way we produce and consume food and energy have a huge impact.

As the human population increases, the populations the other species we share the planet with will continue to fall unless we transform our relationship with nature.

Together, we can change this.


*almost 21,000 monitored populations of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and fish
 

Mountain gorillas are found in only two places – the Virunga mountains, where the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda and Uganda meet, and Bwindi Impenetrable National Park in Uganda. Just over 1,000 remain in the wild but the outlook for these gentle giants looks much brighter than it did a few decades ago.

In 1991, we set up the International Gorilla Conservation Programme (IGCP) with our partners at the African Wildlife Foundation and Flora and Fauna International. And by working together with local communities and the governments of the three countries, we’ve managed to reverse the decline in mountain gorilla numbers.

Regular censuses show both populations steadily increasing. The Virunga population now numbers over 600 individuals, up from 480 in 2010, while the Bwindi population grew from around 400 in 2010 to 459 at the latest count in 2019.   

Working with local people is at the heart of our gorilla conservation work – and we’re supporting communities with alternative sources of fuel, water and livelihoods to take pressure off the gorilla’s forest habitat.  Gorilla tourism, although currently impacted by the global pandemic lockdown,  provides local people with a strong incentive to protect the species – providing them with an important source of jobs and income, as well as revenue for national governments. 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Mountain gorillas are the only great apes whose numbers are increasing. Populations of chimpanzees, bonobos, orang-utans and the other gorilla sub-species are all declining as a result of the actions of their close relative: Homo sapiens.

It’s the same story across all groups of species. The Living Planet Index, which tracks trends in almost 21,000 populations of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fishes, shows an average decline of 68% since 1970. In other words, we’ve lost almost two-thirds of the world’s wildlife in less than half a century.

Dedicated conservation initiatives, like the IGCP’s efforts to save mountain gorillas, can make a difference for particular species and populations, and remain a core part of our work. But to save the world’s wildlife, we need to address the underlying threats. 

Habitat loss and degradation, overexploitation, climate change, invasive species and pollution are the main causes of species decline – and they’re all a result of human actions. In particular, the way we produce and consume food and energy have a huge impact.

As the human population increases, the populations the other species we share the planet with will continue to fall unless we transform our relationship with nature.

Together, we can change this.


*almost 21,000 monitored populations of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and fish
 

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WWF is piloting an innovative tracking system, using blockchain technology, in the Pacific Ocean to help ensure the fish we eat is sustainable.

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One-third of the world’s ocean fish stocks are already overfished.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

Imagine if, when you bought a can of tuna, you could scan a QR code and get instant information telling you exactly where, when and how the fish inside was caught. You could be sure that it came from a sustainable source, without causing harm to other marine life, and that no slave labour or human rights abuses had occurred along the supply chain.

That scenario is close to becoming a reality, thanks to a new project we’ve been trialling in the Pacific Ocean with tech partners ConsenSys and TraSeable, and tuna fishing and processing company Sea Quest Fiji. This traceability and transparency could help stamp out illegal and unsustainable fishing, and improve working conditions in the tuna industry.

The project uses blockchain technology to track the fish from the vessel that catches it, to the processing plant, to the distributor. Blockchain is the technology behind digital currencies like Bitcoin. Unlike paper-based records, it can’t be changed or tampered with, and the information is accessible to anyone.

The next step will be to work with retailers to complete the chain from “bait to plate”. And there’s a huge opportunity to use the technology with other responsible fisheries. 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Though some companies like Sea Quest Fiji have made great efforts to improve their sustainability, around a third of the world’s tuna stocks are overfished. And it’s the same story across other seafood species: according to the latest data, 34% of all the world’s fish stocks have been exploited beyond sustainable limits, a proportion that’s more than tripled in the last half-century and continues to rise steadily.

Declining fish stocks are bad news for the whole ocean ecosystem, and for the hundreds of millions of people who rely on fishing for food and income. But with better management, fish populations can recover and continue to provide food and livelihoods for generations to come.

We’re tackling the issue from several angles. From the Mediterranean to Mozambique, we’re supporting fishing communities to fish sustainably and to conserve and restore marine habitats. We’re working with governments to increase protection for the ocean, strengthen fisheries management, reform subsidies that encourage overfishing, and clamp down on illegal, unregulated and unreported fishing. As ever, we’re encouraging businesses to know their supply chains and only buy seafood from sustainable sources.

Together, we can change this.

Imagine if, when you bought a can of tuna, you could scan a QR code and get instant information telling you exactly where, when and how the fish inside was caught. You could be sure that it came from a sustainable source, without causing harm to other marine life, and that no slave labour or human rights abuses had occurred along the supply chain.

That scenario is close to becoming a reality, thanks to a new project we’ve been trialling in the Pacific Ocean with tech partners ConsenSys and TraSeable, and tuna fishing and processing company Sea Quest Fiji. This traceability and transparency could help stamp out illegal and unsustainable fishing, and improve working conditions in the tuna industry.

The project uses blockchain technology to track the fish from the vessel that catches it, to the processing plant, to the distributor. Blockchain is the technology behind digital currencies like Bitcoin. Unlike paper-based records, it can’t be changed or tampered with, and the information is accessible to anyone.

The next step will be to work with retailers to complete the chain from “bait to plate”. And there’s a huge opportunity to use the technology with other responsible fisheries. 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Though some companies like Sea Quest Fiji have made great efforts to improve their sustainability, around a third of the world’s tuna stocks are overfished. And it’s the same story across other seafood species: according to the latest data, 34% of all the world’s fish stocks have been exploited beyond sustainable limits, a proportion that’s more than tripled in the last half-century and continues to rise steadily.

Declining fish stocks are bad news for the whole ocean ecosystem, and for the hundreds of millions of people who rely on fishing for food and income. But with better management, fish populations can recover and continue to provide food and livelihoods for generations to come.

We’re tackling the issue from several angles. From the Mediterranean to Mozambique, we’re supporting fishing communities to fish sustainably and to conserve and restore marine habitats. We’re working with governments to increase protection for the ocean, strengthen fisheries management, reform subsidies that encourage overfishing, and clamp down on illegal, unregulated and unreported fishing. As ever, we’re encouraging businesses to know their supply chains and only buy seafood from sustainable sources.

Together, we can change this.

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We have backed community-based whale shark ecotourism in the Philippines for two decades, safeguarding both wildlife and livelihoods.

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Coastal communities and wildlife around the world face increasing challenges, from plastic pollution to the impact of COVID-19 on ecotourism.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

Whale sharks are the world’s largest fish, growing up to 14m long. Swimming with these gentle giants is the experience of a lifetime, and tourists are prepared to pay good money for the privilege.

The small town of Donsol in the Philippines is one of the best places in the world to see and swim with whale sharks, attracting thousands of tourists every year. Shark tourism here supports more than 300 jobs and improves people’s incomes as tourists spend their money with local shops and businesses.

We’ve been supporting community efforts in Donsol for over two decades to make sure that tourism benefits both people and wildlife. We’ve helped develop codes of conduct so tourists don’t disturb the whale sharks, and made sure that some of the revenue raised goes back into marine conservation projects. Visiting tourists are also an important part of our citizen science efforts equipped with rented underwater cameras, they help us keep track of local whale shark populations.

We’ve also supported economic development plans that will enable local people to make the most of the opportunities tourism brings. And we’re working with them to prevent illegal and unsustainable fishing and other threats to the whale sharks’ habitat.

Our experience in Donsol shows that when coastal communities benefit directly from the wildlife on their doorstep, they have a strong incentive to conserve it.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

As we’ve seen in Donsol, healthy marine wildlife is good for coastal communities. But in far too many places, both are struggling.

Falling fish stocks as a result of overfishing threaten people’s livelihoods and food security – yet with few other economic opportunities available to them, many people have little option other than to chase after dwindling fish populations.

Coastal communities are also on the frontline of climate change. Many are already suffering the consequences of rising sea levels and increasingly frequent and ferocious storms and other extreme weather. Warming seas are killing coral reefs, threatening the fishing and diving industries they support.

On top of this, the COVID-19 pandemic has hit coastal communities that depend on ecotourism particularly hard. With travel restrictions preventing tourists from visiting, many people have seen their incomes dry up. 

Supporting coastal communities to look after and benefit from their marine resources has never been more important. Around the world, we’re working with communities to help them rebuild fish stocks, conserve and restore vital ecosystems like coral reefs, mangroves and seagrass meadows, tackle plastic pollution, and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

Together, we can change this.

Whale sharks are the world’s largest fish, growing up to 14m long. Swimming with these gentle giants is the experience of a lifetime, and tourists are prepared to pay good money for the privilege.

The small town of Donsol in the Philippines is one of the best places in the world to see and swim with whale sharks, attracting thousands of tourists every year. Shark tourism here supports more than 300 jobs and improves people’s incomes as tourists spend their money with local shops and businesses.

We’ve been supporting community efforts in Donsol for over two decades to make sure that tourism benefits both people and wildlife. We’ve helped develop codes of conduct so tourists don’t disturb the whale sharks, and made sure that some of the revenue raised goes back into marine conservation projects. Visiting tourists are also an important part of our citizen science efforts equipped with rented underwater cameras, they help us keep track of local whale shark populations.

We’ve also supported economic development plans that will enable local people to make the most of the opportunities tourism brings. And we’re working with them to prevent illegal and unsustainable fishing and other threats to the whale sharks’ habitat.

Our experience in Donsol shows that when coastal communities benefit directly from the wildlife on their doorstep, they have a strong incentive to conserve it.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

As we’ve seen in Donsol, healthy marine wildlife is good for coastal communities. But in far too many places, both are struggling.

Falling fish stocks as a result of overfishing threaten people’s livelihoods and food security – yet with few other economic opportunities available to them, many people have little option other than to chase after dwindling fish populations.

Coastal communities are also on the frontline of climate change. Many are already suffering the consequences of rising sea levels and increasingly frequent and ferocious storms and other extreme weather. Warming seas are killing coral reefs, threatening the fishing and diving industries they support.

On top of this, the COVID-19 pandemic has hit coastal communities that depend on ecotourism particularly hard. With travel restrictions preventing tourists from visiting, many people have seen their incomes dry up. 

Supporting coastal communities to look after and benefit from their marine resources has never been more important. Around the world, we’re working with communities to help them rebuild fish stocks, conserve and restore vital ecosystems like coral reefs, mangroves and seagrass meadows, tackle plastic pollution, and adapt to the impacts of climate change.

Together, we can change this.

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We helped establish the world’s largest ocean protected area, covering over 1.5 million km², in waters near Antarctica.

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Only 8% of the ocean is protected today.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS

The Ross Sea off Antarctica is one of the most pristine wilderness areas on the planet – and we’re determined to keep it that way.

In 2016, after years of work by WWF and many others, governments agreed to create the world’s largest ocean protection plan in the Southern Ocean. An area of over 1.5 million km2 off Antarctica – the size of France, Germany and Spain combined – has been set aside for conservation. More than 70% of it is a fully protected marine reserve, with only strictly controlled research fishing allowed in the rest.

The waters and sea ice of the Ross Sea teem with life. Its nutrient-rich waters produce vast quantities of krill and plankton, which in turn support countless fish, seabirds, seals and whales – an incredible 16,000 species in total. The area is home to a third of the world’s Adélie penguins, a quarter of all emperor penguins, a third of Antarctic petrels, and over half of all South Pacific Weddell seals.

Protecting the Ross Sea is a historic achievement, because it required the agreement of 24 countries plus the European Union. It shows that countries can come together to protect the ocean we all depend on.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

The Ross Sea marine reserve is large – but covers just one small part of the vast world ocean.

Despite a big increase in marine protected areas over the last few years, just 8% of the ocean is officially protected. And only a small fraction of this area is well managed, with damaging activities allowed to continue in many protected zones.

We want to see 30% of land and sea properly protected by 2030. The protection and restoration of key habitats are powerful ways to safeguard treasured wildlife, sustain fisheries and build climate defences. 

People benefit, because closing some areas off for fishing actually leads to increased catches in nearby waters as fish stocks grow, while coastal tourism benefits from clean and healthy seas.

Protected areas in the right places, under careful management, can deliver triple bottom-line benefits in terms of increasing sustainable development opportunities for coastal communities, reducing the harmful impacts of the climate crisis, and building the resilience of the ocean’s natural systems.

Around the world, we’re working with governments, scientists, industry and local communities to identify areas for protection and to make sure they’re managed in ways that are good for nature and people too.

Together, we can change this.

The Ross Sea off Antarctica is one of the most pristine wilderness areas on the planet – and we’re determined to keep it that way.

In 2016, after years of work by WWF and many others, governments agreed to create the world’s largest ocean protection plan in the Southern Ocean. An area of over 1.5 million km2 off Antarctica – the size of France, Germany and Spain combined – has been set aside for conservation. More than 70% of it is a fully protected marine reserve, with only strictly controlled research fishing allowed in the rest.

The waters and sea ice of the Ross Sea teem with life. Its nutrient-rich waters produce vast quantities of krill and plankton, which in turn support countless fish, seabirds, seals and whales – an incredible 16,000 species in total. The area is home to a third of the world’s Adélie penguins, a quarter of all emperor penguins, a third of Antarctic petrels, and over half of all South Pacific Weddell seals.

Protecting the Ross Sea is a historic achievement, because it required the agreement of 24 countries plus the European Union. It shows that countries can come together to protect the ocean we all depend on.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

The Ross Sea marine reserve is large – but covers just one small part of the vast world ocean.

Despite a big increase in marine protected areas over the last few years, just 8% of the ocean is officially protected. And only a small fraction of this area is well managed, with damaging activities allowed to continue in many protected zones.

We want to see 30% of land and sea properly protected by 2030. The protection and restoration of key habitats are powerful ways to safeguard treasured wildlife, sustain fisheries and build climate defences. 

People benefit, because closing some areas off for fishing actually leads to increased catches in nearby waters as fish stocks grow, while coastal tourism benefits from clean and healthy seas.

Protected areas in the right places, under careful management, can deliver triple bottom-line benefits in terms of increasing sustainable development opportunities for coastal communities, reducing the harmful impacts of the climate crisis, and building the resilience of the ocean’s natural systems.

Around the world, we’re working with governments, scientists, industry and local communities to identify areas for protection and to make sure they’re managed in ways that are good for nature and people too.

Together, we can change this.

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WITH YOUR SUPPORT

And with communities and governments, we have protected over 100 million hectares of wetlands around the world.

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Wetlands are vital life-support systems for people and wildlife but are being lost 3 times faster than forests.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS

From rivers and reefs to lakes and lagoons, marshes and mangroves, the world needs its wetlands. Whether it’s providing water and flood protection for cities, securing the food and livelihoods of local communities, storing carbon or welcoming millions of migratory birds, wetlands are vitally important for people and nature.

Protecting wetlands has always been a central part of our work. One of our first big success stories back in the 1960s was winning protection for the Doñana marshes in Spain, one of Europe’s most important wetland habitats. Since then, we’ve helped protect around 110 million hectares of wetlands around the world – an area around twice the size of Spain.

We’re an active partner in the Ramsar Convention, an international treaty to conserve the world’s wetlands which celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2021. More than 2,400 wetlands of international importance – known as Ramsar sites – covering over 250 million hectares have been designated under the convention, and our support has played a part in almost half the total area.

We’re continuing to work with governments to win protection for more wetlands, and actively working with local partners to conserve, restore and sustainably manage wetlands all over the world.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Many Ramsar sites face serious threats, and much more work is needed to ensure they’re protected in practice as well as on paper. For the more than 80% of wetlands that aren’t protected, the situation is even worse.

The world’s wetland area has shrunk by an estimated 87% in the modern era. We’ve destroyed more than a third of our wetlands in the last half-century, and continue to lose a further 1.6% every year. We’ve drained them, converted them to farmland, built over them, and dammed and diverted them.

In the process, we’ve lost the vital services they provide – and today we need them more than ever. Wetlands play an important role in both limiting the impacts of climate change and helping us adapt to a hotter and more unpredictable climate. They’re also crucial for our food security and for supplying fresh water, at a time when water scarcity already affects around half the world’s population and is increasing.

As wetlands have been lost, freshwater biodiversity has seen catastrophic declines. Populations of freshwater species have been reduced by more than 80% on average since 1970 – an even greater fall than among marine and land-based species.

With wetlands still dangerously undervalued, there is still much to do.

Together, we can change this.

From rivers and reefs to lakes and lagoons, marshes and mangroves, the world needs its wetlands. Whether it’s providing water and flood protection for cities, securing the food and livelihoods of local communities, storing carbon or welcoming millions of migratory birds, wetlands are vitally important for people and nature.

Protecting wetlands has always been a central part of our work. One of our first big success stories back in the 1960s was winning protection for the Doñana marshes in Spain, one of Europe’s most important wetland habitats. Since then, we’ve helped protect around 110 million hectares of wetlands around the world – an area around twice the size of Spain.

We’re an active partner in the Ramsar Convention, an international treaty to conserve the world’s wetlands which celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2021. More than 2,400 wetlands of international importance – known as Ramsar sites – covering over 250 million hectares have been designated under the convention, and our support has played a part in almost half the total area.

We’re continuing to work with governments to win protection for more wetlands, and actively working with local partners to conserve, restore and sustainably manage wetlands all over the world.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Many Ramsar sites face serious threats, and much more work is needed to ensure they’re protected in practice as well as on paper. For the more than 80% of wetlands that aren’t protected, the situation is even worse.

The world’s wetland area has shrunk by an estimated 87% in the modern era. We’ve destroyed more than a third of our wetlands in the last half-century, and continue to lose a further 1.6% every year. We’ve drained them, converted them to farmland, built over them, and dammed and diverted them.

In the process, we’ve lost the vital services they provide – and today we need them more than ever. Wetlands play an important role in both limiting the impacts of climate change and helping us adapt to a hotter and more unpredictable climate. They’re also crucial for our food security and for supplying fresh water, at a time when water scarcity already affects around half the world’s population and is increasing.

As wetlands have been lost, freshwater biodiversity has seen catastrophic declines. Populations of freshwater species have been reduced by more than 80% on average since 1970 – an even greater fall than among marine and land-based species.

With wetlands still dangerously undervalued, there is still much to do.

Together, we can change this.

Support our work

Help build a world where people and nature thrive

Donate

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Alongside the efforts of scientists and policymakers, we have shown nature’s vital role in tackling the climate crisis.

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Nature can only help prevent a catastrophic global temperature increase if its accelerating destruction is halted and reversed.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS

The natural world has an essential role to play in solving the climate crisis. Protecting, restoring and reconnecting natural habitats can help us keep greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere and limit the  global temperature rise, as well as adapt to the unavoidable impacts of climate disruption. They can also help stop biodiversity loss and provide food, protection and livelihoods for millions of people, many of whom are among the most vulnerable in our society.

The importance of nature-based solutions to the climate crisis is increasingly being recognized – and WWF has played a major role in that.

Forests are the best-known example. There is now global agreement that we need to stop deforestation – a major source of greenhouse gas emissions – and plant more trees so that forests can continue to store and absorb carbon. Many countries, particularly in the tropics, have made protecting and restoring forests a key part of their national climate change plans.

Our efforts are also helping to increase global understanding and action for other ecosystems – from peatlands and grasslands to mangroves and seagrass meadows. Like forests, these are hugely important for storing carbon and removing it from the atmosphere, while also providing habitats for nature and benefits for people. 

We’re also contributing to nature-based initiatives that help people weather the impacts of the climate crisis. From safeguarding efforts for coral reefs that protect coastal settlements from storms, to wetlands and forests that regulate floods and droughts.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Many governments, businesses and communities aren’t yet taking action at anything like the pace and scale we need.

Instead of making the most of their capacity to store carbon, we’re continuing to destroy forests and other ecosystems faster than ever. Tropical deforestation is increasing, wetlands and mangroves are being lost at an even faster rate, and other ecosystems like grasslands and savannahs are being ploughed up for farmland.

Our actions are also compounding the effects of climate change on nature. Fragmented forests are more vulnerable to fires – which are becoming increasingly frequent and ferocious as the planet heats up. Coral reefs, already damaged by overfishing and pollution, are struggling to survive in warming seas. Falling populations of wild animals means some ecosystems are less resilient and can’t regenerate naturally.

We urgently need joined-up action to address the nature and climate crises together. If we’re smart about it, we can tackle the climate crisis in ways that benefit people and the natural world. But the longer we leave it, the harder it will become to avoid a catastrophic temperature rise and devastating damage to our natural life-support systems.

Together, we can change this.

The natural world has an essential role to play in solving the climate crisis. Protecting, restoring and reconnecting natural habitats can help us keep greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere and limit the  global temperature rise, as well as adapt to the unavoidable impacts of climate disruption. They can also help stop biodiversity loss and provide food, protection and livelihoods for millions of people, many of whom are among the most vulnerable in our society.

The importance of nature-based solutions to the climate crisis is increasingly being recognized – and WWF has played a major role in that.

Forests are the best-known example. There is now global agreement that we need to stop deforestation – a major source of greenhouse gas emissions – and plant more trees so that forests can continue to store and absorb carbon. Many countries, particularly in the tropics, have made protecting and restoring forests a key part of their national climate change plans.

Our efforts are also helping to increase global understanding and action for other ecosystems – from peatlands and grasslands to mangroves and seagrass meadows. Like forests, these are hugely important for storing carbon and removing it from the atmosphere, while also providing habitats for nature and benefits for people. 

We’re also contributing to nature-based initiatives that help people weather the impacts of the climate crisis. From safeguarding efforts for coral reefs that protect coastal settlements from storms, to wetlands and forests that regulate floods and droughts.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Many governments, businesses and communities aren’t yet taking action at anything like the pace and scale we need.

Instead of making the most of their capacity to store carbon, we’re continuing to destroy forests and other ecosystems faster than ever. Tropical deforestation is increasing, wetlands and mangroves are being lost at an even faster rate, and other ecosystems like grasslands and savannahs are being ploughed up for farmland.

Our actions are also compounding the effects of climate change on nature. Fragmented forests are more vulnerable to fires – which are becoming increasingly frequent and ferocious as the planet heats up. Coral reefs, already damaged by overfishing and pollution, are struggling to survive in warming seas. Falling populations of wild animals means some ecosystems are less resilient and can’t regenerate naturally.

We urgently need joined-up action to address the nature and climate crises together. If we’re smart about it, we can tackle the climate crisis in ways that benefit people and the natural world. But the longer we leave it, the harder it will become to avoid a catastrophic temperature rise and devastating damage to our natural life-support systems.

Together, we can change this.

Support our work

Help build a world where people and nature thrive

Donate

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And with the involvement of government and local communities, giant panda numbers in the wild have increased by 68% over the past 40 years.

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With a population of little more than 1800, pandas still remain vulnerable to the impacts of habitat loss and fragmentation.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS

If there’s one animal everybody associates with WWF, it’s the giant panda. And we’re immensely proud to have played a part in its recovery.

We’ve been at the heart of panda conservation since 1979, when we became the first international conservation organization to be invited to work in China. Giant pandas were once widespread in China and parts of Viet Nam and Myanmar, but habitat loss caused by human activities had taken a heavy toll. A census in the 1980s put the total population of wild pandas at just 1,114, confined to a handful of sites in northern China.

Working with the Chinese government, we’ve helped to set up a network of panda reserves to protect their bamboo habitat – today, there are 67 reserves covering around 1.4 million hectares, which protect around two-thirds of the wild panda population. We’ve also worked with nearby communities to reduce the pressure on pandas from people.

These efforts have really paid off. The next panda census in the early 2000s put the population at 1,596, and this had increased to 1,864 at the latest count in 2014. This 17% rise in just a decade was enough for the panda to be officially taken off the list of “Endangered” species.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Despite its recent recovery, the giant panda is still classified as “Vulnerable”. With a total population of less than 2,000, its future depends on our continued support.

Because their habitat has become so fragmented, pandas are divided into many smaller groups or sub-populations, some of which are very small and in danger of going extinct locally. It’s a problem that could get worse as new roads, railways and other infrastructure are built, making it harder for the pandas to move around to interbreed.

Fragmentation also makes it harder for pandas to adapt to changes in their habitat. Bamboo naturally dies off every few decades, so the pandas need to move to new areas. Climate change is also likely to reduce the area of suitable bamboo habitat.

For the panda population to continue to grow, we need to keep up our efforts to protect, restore and reconnect their habitat. That includes making sure the needs of pandas are considered in new infrastructure projects, creating wildlife corridors and supporting local communities to develop sustainable livelihoods and alternative sources of fuel so they don’t need to disturb the pandas’ habitat.

Together, we can change this.

If there’s one animal everybody associates with WWF, it’s the giant panda. And we’re immensely proud to have played a part in its recovery.

We’ve been at the heart of panda conservation since 1979, when we became the first international conservation organization to be invited to work in China. Giant pandas were once widespread in China and parts of Viet Nam and Myanmar, but habitat loss caused by human activities had taken a heavy toll. A census in the 1980s put the total population of wild pandas at just 1,114, confined to a handful of sites in northern China.

Working with the Chinese government, we’ve helped to set up a network of panda reserves to protect their bamboo habitat – today, there are 67 reserves covering around 1.4 million hectares, which protect around two-thirds of the wild panda population. We’ve also worked with nearby communities to reduce the pressure on pandas from people.

These efforts have really paid off. The next panda census in the early 2000s put the population at 1,596, and this had increased to 1,864 at the latest count in 2014. This 17% rise in just a decade was enough for the panda to be officially taken off the list of “Endangered” species.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Despite its recent recovery, the giant panda is still classified as “Vulnerable”. With a total population of less than 2,000, its future depends on our continued support.

Because their habitat has become so fragmented, pandas are divided into many smaller groups or sub-populations, some of which are very small and in danger of going extinct locally. It’s a problem that could get worse as new roads, railways and other infrastructure are built, making it harder for the pandas to move around to interbreed.

Fragmentation also makes it harder for pandas to adapt to changes in their habitat. Bamboo naturally dies off every few decades, so the pandas need to move to new areas. Climate change is also likely to reduce the area of suitable bamboo habitat.

For the panda population to continue to grow, we need to keep up our efforts to protect, restore and reconnect their habitat. That includes making sure the needs of pandas are considered in new infrastructure projects, creating wildlife corridors and supporting local communities to develop sustainable livelihoods and alternative sources of fuel so they don’t need to disturb the pandas’ habitat.

Together, we can change this.

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Together with local communities around the Dzanga-Sangha Protected Areas in the Central African Republic, we’ve established an ecotourism programme that both helps critically endangered western lowland gorillas and boosts livelihoods.

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Poaching, the illicit bushmeat trade, unsustainable logging and recurring political instability remain a threat to the local communities, who rely on nature.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER...

Bayanga in the Central African Republic is an extraordinary place. Part of the Dzanga-Sangha Protected Area complex in the Congo Basin rainforest, the area is home to incredible wildlife including forest elephants and critically endangered western lowland gorillas.

For over 20 years, we’ve been running a programme in the area to enable gorilla tourism and research. This provides a major source of income and employment to local people, as well as helping to fund conservation and the management of the protected area.

Since 1998, the programme has successfully habituated several gorilla families – helping them to become comfortable with the presence of people. This work owes much to the exceptional tracking skills and unparalleled knowledge of the forest of the native Ba'Aka people, who still practise their traditional lifestyle in this area.

Among the habituated gorillas that tourists come to visit are the Makumba group. The growing family comprises a silverback, two adult females, one blackback (adolescent male), a pair of 5-year-old twins, an infant born in February 2019 and a new baby born in October 2020.

 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

Poaching, illicit bushmeat trade, unsustainable logging and political instability continue to threaten the forests of Dzanga-Sangha and the people and wildlife who depend on them. Recently, the COVID-19 pandemic halted tourism in Dzanga-Sangha, resulting in an income cut for local communities.

As one of the most active NGOs in the region, we’ve helped build hospitals, a radio station, schools, a campus and a research station. We’ve also rebuilt an eco-tourism lodge, helped set up a human rights centre and provide about 700 scholarships to Ba’Aka students every year. We also run a mobile health clinic which provides free treatment to up to 10,000 people a year.

We know that human well-being and the protection of the rainforest are inextricably linked – conservation is only successful when people thrive too.

 

Together, we can change this.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER...

Bayanga in the Central African Republic is an extraordinary place. Part of the Dzanga-Sangha Protected Area complex in the Congo Basin rainforest, the area is home to incredible wildlife including forest elephants and critically endangered western lowland gorillas.

For over 20 years, we’ve been running a programme in the area to enable gorilla tourism and research. This provides a major source of income and employment to local people, as well as helping to fund conservation and the management of the protected area.

Since 1998, the programme has successfully habituated several gorilla families – helping them to become comfortable with the presence of people. This work owes much to the exceptional tracking skills and unparalleled knowledge of the forest of the native Ba'Aka people, who still practise their traditional lifestyle in this area.

Among the habituated gorillas that tourists come to visit are the Makumba group. The growing family comprises a silverback, two adult females, one blackback (adolescent male), a pair of 5-year-old twins, an infant born in February 2019 and a new baby born in October 2020.

 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

Poaching, illicit bushmeat trade, unsustainable logging and political instability continue to threaten the forests of Dzanga-Sangha and the people and wildlife who depend on them. Recently, the COVID-19 pandemic halted tourism in Dzanga-Sangha, resulting in an income cut for local communities.

As one of the most active NGOs in the region, we’ve helped build hospitals, a radio station, schools, a campus and a research station. We’ve also rebuilt an eco-tourism lodge, helped set up a human rights centre and provide about 700 scholarships to Ba’Aka students every year. We also run a mobile health clinic which provides free treatment to up to 10,000 people a year.

We know that human well-being and the protection of the rainforest are inextricably linked – conservation is only successful when people thrive too.

 

Together, we can change this.

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Help build a world where people and nature thrive

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And local communities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, 12,000 hectares of forest have been planted outside the Virunga National Park – offering a sustainable and legal alternative to taking charcoal from the protected area.

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Too much charcoal is still coming from Virunga – we need to double these fuelwood plantations in the next five years.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The city of Goma in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has grown rapidly in recent decades, and the vast majority of its population relies on charcoal for cooking. The surrounding natural forests have almost disappeared, but one source of wood still remains: the forests of Virunga National Park, one of Africa’s most important wildlife havens and home to critically endangered mountain gorillas.

In the mid-2000s, 80% of charcoal consumed in Goma originated from Virunga. To stop the destruction, we launched our EcoMakala project with the aim of producing a sustainable supply of charcoal (makala in Swahili) from planted trees.

Working with local farmers, we’ve helped plant 20 million fast-growing trees in small woodlots around Virunga National Park, covering an area of around 12,000 hectares. As well as taking the pressure off natural forest, charcoal from the fuelwood plantations provides an income for local smallholders.  

At the same time, we’ve also introduced energy-efficient cooking stoves that can halve a typical household’s charcoal consumption. Tens of thousands of families are now using these improved stoves.   

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Despite the progress we’ve seen, illegal fuelwood harvesting remains a threat to Virunga and its wildlife. There’s not yet enough wood from plantations to supply the 2 million inhabitants of Goma and surrounding areas, the vast majority of whom depend on charcoal for their energy needs.

We’re aiming to increase the area of fuelwood plantations to at least 20,000 hectares – though we know this will be challenging in a densely populated area where local people also need land to grow food. At the same time, more families must gain access to energy-efficient stoves.

By reducing charcoal demand while increasing the sustainable supply, we can save Virunga’s forests and the wildlife they support – before it’s too late.  

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The city of Goma in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has grown rapidly in recent decades, and the vast majority of its population relies on charcoal for cooking. The surrounding natural forests have almost disappeared, but one source of wood still remains: the forests of Virunga National Park, one of Africa’s most important wildlife havens and home to critically endangered mountain gorillas.

In the mid-2000s, 80% of charcoal consumed in Goma originated from Virunga. To stop the destruction, we launched our EcoMakala project with the aim of producing a sustainable supply of charcoal (makala in Swahili) from planted trees.

Working with local farmers, we’ve helped plant 20 million fast-growing trees in small woodlots around Virunga National Park, covering an area of around 12,000 hectares. As well as taking the pressure off natural forest, charcoal from the fuelwood plantations provides an income for local smallholders.  

At the same time, we’ve also introduced energy-efficient cooking stoves that can halve a typical household’s charcoal consumption. Tens of thousands of families are now using these improved stoves.   

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Despite the progress we’ve seen, illegal fuelwood harvesting remains a threat to Virunga and its wildlife. There’s not yet enough wood from plantations to supply the 2 million inhabitants of Goma and surrounding areas, the vast majority of whom depend on charcoal for their energy needs.

We’re aiming to increase the area of fuelwood plantations to at least 20,000 hectares – though we know this will be challenging in a densely populated area where local people also need land to grow food. At the same time, more families must gain access to energy-efficient stoves.

By reducing charcoal demand while increasing the sustainable supply, we can save Virunga’s forests and the wildlife they support – before it’s too late.  

Together, we can change this

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And together with partners and Madagascar’s ministry for education, we have set up 750 environmental clubs for young people since 1992.

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We need even more youth engagement to keep protecting the unique biodiversity of Madagascar from deforestation and climate change.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The island of Madagascar is incredibly rich in biodiversity. It’s home to 5% of all the world’s plant and animal species, and a staggering 80% of them – including more than 100 species of lemurs – aren’t found anywhere else on Earth.

Madagascar is a young nation – half the population is under 20 – so it’s vital that young people understand the importance of nature and are inspired to protect their unique heritage. That’s why, since 1987, we’ve been concentrating on environmental education in the country. 

Back in 1991 we launched the magazine Vintsy (from the Malagasy word for kingfisher), which is read and loved by young people across the country. There are now 750 Vintsy clubs right across the island, giving them the guidance and inspiration they need to become active eco-ambassadors in their communities. More than 41,000 young Malagasies are active members of the Vintsy movement, raising awareness for the environment, planting trees, organizing beach clean-ups and educating others.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Despite many positive developments, Madagascar’s natural riches are under severe threat. The inheritance of future generations risks being squandered through illegal and unsustainable logging, deforestation, wildlife trafficking and overfishing – fuelled by corruption and poor governance. The loss of habitats for lemurs, tortoises, geckos and other amazing species is undermining the country’s thriving ecotourism industry. And the island and its biodiversity are also being hard hit by climate change.

We’re continuing to work with young people, communities and grassroots organizations so local people can defend their environment from threats like deforestation, overexploitation and climate change, and benefit from taking care of their natural resources. We’re also working with the national government to improve environmental policies and regulations.  

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The island of Madagascar is incredibly rich in biodiversity. It’s home to 5% of all the world’s plant and animal species, and a staggering 80% of them – including more than 100 species of lemurs – aren’t found anywhere else on Earth.

Madagascar is a young nation – half the population is under 20 – so it’s vital that young people understand the importance of nature and are inspired to protect their unique heritage. That’s why, since 1987, we’ve been concentrating on environmental education in the country. 

Back in 1991 we launched the magazine Vintsy (from the Malagasy word for kingfisher), which is read and loved by young people across the country. There are now 750 Vintsy clubs right across the island, giving them the guidance and inspiration they need to become active eco-ambassadors in their communities. More than 41,000 young Malagasies are active members of the Vintsy movement, raising awareness for the environment, planting trees, organizing beach clean-ups and educating others.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Despite many positive developments, Madagascar’s natural riches are under severe threat. The inheritance of future generations risks being squandered through illegal and unsustainable logging, deforestation, wildlife trafficking and overfishing – fuelled by corruption and poor governance. The loss of habitats for lemurs, tortoises, geckos and other amazing species is undermining the country’s thriving ecotourism industry. And the island and its biodiversity are also being hard hit by climate change.

We’re continuing to work with young people, communities and grassroots organizations so local people can defend their environment from threats like deforestation, overexploitation and climate change, and benefit from taking care of their natural resources. We’re also working with the national government to improve environmental policies and regulations.  

Together, we can change this

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We have helped 21 wetlands in Madagascar gain recognition as sites of international importance – committing the government to safeguard these vital wildernesses for people and wildlife.

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There are still many biodiversity-rich wetlands around the world that must be safeguarded.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The island of Madagascar is rich in unique wildlife – including in its wetlands, which support nearly 100 endemic fish species and over 300 types of amphibian.

Thanks in part to support from WWF, the country has designated 21 sites with a combined area of more than 2 million hectares as wetlands of international importance under the Ramsar Convention. When a wetland is designated under the convention, the government commits to protecting its natural characteristics and making sure it’s managed sustainably.

We’ve been actively involved in getting several of the Ramsar sites listed, beginning in 2012 with Lakes Ambondro and Sirave – a wildlife-rich complex of lakes, marshes, rivers and mangroves that provides shelter, breeding and nesting areas to 30 species of aquatic birds as well as Nile crocodiles. 

Working closely with the Malagasy government and local communities, WWF manages three of Madagascar’s Ramsar Sites. These include the mangroves of Tsiribihina – a 47,000-hectare area that’s home to 44 species of waterbirds, as well as flying foxes, lemurs and hawksbill turtles.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Designating an area as a wetland of international importance isn’t the end of the story – it’s essential that Ramsar sites continue to be actively managed, and that requires political will, continued funding and active involvement from local communities.

But even more urgent is the need to safeguard wetlands that don’t yet have any sort of official protection – an estimated 1.6% of the world’s wetland area is lost every year.

We hope Madagascar will inspire other countries, in the southwest Indian Ocean region and beyond, to take bold action to protect these priceless wildernesses.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The island of Madagascar is rich in unique wildlife – including in its wetlands, which support nearly 100 endemic fish species and over 300 types of amphibian.

Thanks in part to support from WWF, the country has designated 21 sites with a combined area of more than 2 million hectares as wetlands of international importance under the Ramsar Convention. When a wetland is designated under the convention, the government commits to protecting its natural characteristics and making sure it’s managed sustainably.

We’ve been actively involved in getting several of the Ramsar sites listed, beginning in 2012 with Lakes Ambondro and Sirave – a wildlife-rich complex of lakes, marshes, rivers and mangroves that provides shelter, breeding and nesting areas to 30 species of aquatic birds as well as Nile crocodiles. 

Working closely with the Malagasy government and local communities, WWF manages three of Madagascar’s Ramsar Sites. These include the mangroves of Tsiribihina – a 47,000-hectare area that’s home to 44 species of waterbirds, as well as flying foxes, lemurs and hawksbill turtles.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Designating an area as a wetland of international importance isn’t the end of the story – it’s essential that Ramsar sites continue to be actively managed, and that requires political will, continued funding and active involvement from local communities.

But even more urgent is the need to safeguard wetlands that don’t yet have any sort of official protection – an estimated 1.6% of the world’s wetland area is lost every year.

We hope Madagascar will inspire other countries, in the southwest Indian Ocean region and beyond, to take bold action to protect these priceless wildernesses.

 

Together, we can change this

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WITH YOUR SUPPORT

And thanks to many partners, local communities in Namibia are managing their own natural resources in 87 conservancies covering 20% of the country – benefitting both people and wildlife.

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The COVID-19 pandemic has caused communities to lose vital tourism income, jeopardizing their ability to manage and protect their wildlife.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Over the past 25 years, we’ve worked with the government, local NGOs and rural communities to set up 87 communal conservancies across Namibia. These put local people in control of managing the land and wildlife on their doorsteps, enabling them to benefit from sustainably managing their natural resources.

Today, conservancies cover 20% of the country and bring in around US$10 million per year in tourism revenue. As well as directly improving local people’s incomes, this covers the costs of conservation work – including employing some 700 community game guards to protect wildlife. 

Because empowered communities benefit from the presence of wildlife, the conservancy programme has contributed to increasing populations of endangered wildlife in Namibia. The country now holds the largest free-roaming populations of black rhinos outside protected areas, and numbers of elephants and lions are also steadily increasing.
  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Living with wildlife comes at a cost. Increasing numbers of wild animals, coupled with the ongoing drought in Namibia, has led to escalating human-wildlife conflict – including livestock being killed by predators, and crops being raided and waterpoints damaged by elephants.

Usually, the benefits outweigh the costs. Tourism revenues fund compensation and insurance schemes as well as projects to reduce potential conflicts. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has wiped out tourism income over the past year, undermining conservancies’ ability to manage their wildlife.

We’re providing emergency support to help communities continue with their conservation work and manage human-wildlife conflict. But we’re also looking at ways to reduce their dependence on tourism alone – for example by developing ‘wildlife credits’ schemes, where communities receive performance-based payments for successfully conserving the wildlife that we all value.  

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Over the past 25 years, we’ve worked with the government, local NGOs and rural communities to set up 87 communal conservancies across Namibia. These put local people in control of managing the land and wildlife on their doorsteps, enabling them to benefit from sustainably managing their natural resources.

Today, conservancies cover 20% of the country and bring in around US$10 million per year in tourism revenue. As well as directly improving local people’s incomes, this covers the costs of conservation work – including employing some 700 community game guards to protect wildlife. 

Because empowered communities benefit from the presence of wildlife, the conservancy programme has contributed to increasing populations of endangered wildlife in Namibia. The country now holds the largest free-roaming populations of black rhinos outside protected areas, and numbers of elephants and lions are also steadily increasing.
  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Living with wildlife comes at a cost. Increasing numbers of wild animals, coupled with the ongoing drought in Namibia, has led to escalating human-wildlife conflict – including livestock being killed by predators, and crops being raided and waterpoints damaged by elephants.

Usually, the benefits outweigh the costs. Tourism revenues fund compensation and insurance schemes as well as projects to reduce potential conflicts. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has wiped out tourism income over the past year, undermining conservancies’ ability to manage their wildlife.

We’re providing emergency support to help communities continue with their conservation work and manage human-wildlife conflict. But we’re also looking at ways to reduce their dependence on tourism alone – for example by developing ‘wildlife credits’ schemes, where communities receive performance-based payments for successfully conserving the wildlife that we all value.  

Together, we can change this

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WITH YOUR SUPPORT

We worked with the government of Cameroon and partners to create and manage 11 protected areas covering over 2 million hectares.

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These protected areas – so vital for Indigenous peoples and local communities – face increasing threats from agricultural expansion, poaching and the illegal ivory trade.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The Congo Basin is the world’s second-largest tropical rainforest, covering an area roughly the size of Europe. These forests harbour incredible wildlife from rare butterflies to great apes, provide food, water and shelter for over 75 million people, and store a huge amount of carbon. But during the 1990s, more than 9 million hectares were destroyed as a result of illegal and unsustainable logging.

In 1999, we helped bring together the heads of state from six Congo Basin countries in Yaoundé, the capital of Cameroon. This led to the Yaoundé Declaration, in which the leaders promised to cooperate to conserve the forests.

The declaration has led to action on the ground. In Cameroon, more than a fifth of the forest area is now officially protected. We’ve supported the government of Cameroon and partners to create and manage 11 protected areas covering well over 2 million hectares. Forest management has also been strengthened, with more than 340,000 hectares in Cameroon certified by the Forest Stewardship Council as being managed sustainably.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Forests in Cameroon and across the Congo Basin face increasing pressure from agricultural expansion and logging, as well as poaching and illegal wildlife trade. We’re determined to keep Africa’s green heart beating. 

Conservation can only be successful with the leadership of local people. So we support the efforts of  Indigenous peoples and local communities to uphold their rights – ensuring they can access natural resources within forests and benefit equitably from their sustainable use.

We’re also focusing on protecting biodiversity hotspots and forests with a high conservation value, and promoting good agricultural practices – particularly to ensure the growth of commodities like palm oil and cocoa doesn’t threaten vital forests.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The Congo Basin is the world’s second-largest tropical rainforest, covering an area roughly the size of Europe. These forests harbour incredible wildlife from rare butterflies to great apes, provide food, water and shelter for over 75 million people, and store a huge amount of carbon. But during the 1990s, more than 9 million hectares were destroyed as a result of illegal and unsustainable logging.

In 1999, we helped bring together the heads of state from six Congo Basin countries in Yaoundé, the capital of Cameroon. This led to the Yaoundé Declaration, in which the leaders promised to cooperate to conserve the forests.

The declaration has led to action on the ground. In Cameroon, more than a fifth of the forest area is now officially protected. We’ve supported the government of Cameroon and partners to create and manage 11 protected areas covering well over 2 million hectares. Forest management has also been strengthened, with more than 340,000 hectares in Cameroon certified by the Forest Stewardship Council as being managed sustainably.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Forests in Cameroon and across the Congo Basin face increasing pressure from agricultural expansion and logging, as well as poaching and illegal wildlife trade. We’re determined to keep Africa’s green heart beating. 

Conservation can only be successful with the leadership of local people. So we support the efforts of  Indigenous peoples and local communities to uphold their rights – ensuring they can access natural resources within forests and benefit equitably from their sustainable use.

We’re also focusing on protecting biodiversity hotspots and forests with a high conservation value, and promoting good agricultural practices – particularly to ensure the growth of commodities like palm oil and cocoa doesn’t threaten vital forests.

 

Together, we can change this

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Help build a world where people and nature thrive

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We’ve planted nearly 50,000 koala-friendly trees, vaccinated koalas against the disease and deployed Australia’s largest mobile wildlife hospital.

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A much bigger effort is needed to double koala populations by 2050 and avoid their extinction on Australia’s east coast.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Adored around the world, the koala is an Australian icon – but it’s also under threat. Koala populations in eastern Australia were already facing extinction, and the summer bushfires of 2019-20 have pushed them to the brink.

 

That’s why we’re on a mission to double the number of wild koalas on the east coast of Australia by 2050. 

 

So far, we’ve planted more than 46,000 trees that koalas use for food and as a home, and contributed AU$250,000 to help equip and run Australia’s largest mobile wildlife hospital. We have ambitious plans to upgrade wildlife clinics and help build a new, state-of-the-art native animal hospital to ensure every injured animal receives medical care within two hours of being recovered.

 

Along with our partners, we’re also working on a critical vaccine trial which will provide koalas with greater resilience against the Chlamydia disease – a major threat to koalas in southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales.

 

Other innovative projects include using drones to plant seeds as we attempt to restore vital koala habitat and create a network of wildlife corridors across the east coast.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Declining koala populations could see the species disappear from the east coast of Australia by 2050 if we don’t act fast. 

 

Extreme weather events like the 2019-20 bushfires are devastating for koala populations. Climate change means we can expect these to become more frequent and more severe. Couple this with Australia being a global deforestation hotspot and the future of koalas looks bleak.

 

Both koalas and their habitats need greater protection. With your support, we can safeguard the future of this incredible species by creating koala safe havens and advocating for stronger laws to protect this much-loved marsupial into the future.

 

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Adored around the world, the koala is an Australian icon – but it’s also under threat. Koala populations in eastern Australia were already facing extinction, and the summer bushfires of 2019-20 have pushed them to the brink.

 

That’s why we’re on a mission to double the number of wild koalas on the east coast of Australia by 2050. 

 

So far, we’ve planted more than 46,000 trees that koalas use for food and as a home, and contributed AU$250,000 to help equip and run Australia’s largest mobile wildlife hospital. We have ambitious plans to upgrade wildlife clinics and help build a new, state-of-the-art native animal hospital to ensure every injured animal receives medical care within two hours of being recovered.

 

Along with our partners, we’re also working on a critical vaccine trial which will provide koalas with greater resilience against the Chlamydia disease – a major threat to koalas in southeast Queensland and northern New South Wales.

 

Other innovative projects include using drones to plant seeds as we attempt to restore vital koala habitat and create a network of wildlife corridors across the east coast.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Declining koala populations could see the species disappear from the east coast of Australia by 2050 if we don’t act fast. 

 

Extreme weather events like the 2019-20 bushfires are devastating for koala populations. Climate change means we can expect these to become more frequent and more severe. Couple this with Australia being a global deforestation hotspot and the future of koalas looks bleak.

 

Both koalas and their habitats need greater protection. With your support, we can safeguard the future of this incredible species by creating koala safe havens and advocating for stronger laws to protect this much-loved marsupial into the future.

 

 

Together, we can change this

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And with our partners, we helped ensure otters threatened by Japan’s pet trade now have the highest level of protection.

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The global craze for keeping rare wildlife as pets continues, and the problems of smuggling and poaching still need to be solved.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Japan is one of the world’s major centres for owning exotic pets. Otters have been especially popular, with rising numbers of “otters cafés”, high-profile TV programmes featuring otters and celebrities, and otter pet superstars on social media.

In 2018, our partners at the wildlife trade monitoring network TRAFFIC found that Japan was the number one destination for illegally traded otters from Southeast Asia. In response, we worked together to carry out an urgent study of otter trade and demand in Japan.

The results were shocking, showing how a boom in demand for pet otters was driving illegal international trade – particularly in small-clawed otters, which are listed as “vulnerable” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Legal but unregulated domestic trade exacerbated the problem.

We shared this worrying news in the media and called upon the government to take immediate action. And in 2019, the small-clawed otter was given the highest level of protection under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) – preventing all international trade. Japan also banned domestic trade, action that will help otters stay where they belong: thriving in the wild.
  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Otters are among hundreds of species exploited as exotic pets. Sadly, many pet owners don’t realize that they’re threatening the survival of the species they love.

In a survey we published in March 2021, one in six people (17%) in Japan expressed an interest in keeping exotic pets, with young people being particularly keen. But 95% agreed that stronger regulations on exotic pets were needed.

Solving this issue is a long-term challenge, which needs strong regulations at international and national level, more responsible business practices, and a change in social norms and consumer behaviour. We’re working with many partners in Japan and other countries to ensure people’s love of animals doesn’t harm them.


Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Japan is one of the world’s major centres for owning exotic pets. Otters have been especially popular, with rising numbers of “otters cafés”, high-profile TV programmes featuring otters and celebrities, and otter pet superstars on social media.

In 2018, our partners at the wildlife trade monitoring network TRAFFIC found that Japan was the number one destination for illegally traded otters from Southeast Asia. In response, we worked together to carry out an urgent study of otter trade and demand in Japan.

The results were shocking, showing how a boom in demand for pet otters was driving illegal international trade – particularly in small-clawed otters, which are listed as “vulnerable” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Legal but unregulated domestic trade exacerbated the problem.

We shared this worrying news in the media and called upon the government to take immediate action. And in 2019, the small-clawed otter was given the highest level of protection under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) – preventing all international trade. Japan also banned domestic trade, action that will help otters stay where they belong: thriving in the wild.
  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Otters are among hundreds of species exploited as exotic pets. Sadly, many pet owners don’t realize that they’re threatening the survival of the species they love.

In a survey we published in March 2021, one in six people (17%) in Japan expressed an interest in keeping exotic pets, with young people being particularly keen. But 95% agreed that stronger regulations on exotic pets were needed.

Solving this issue is a long-term challenge, which needs strong regulations at international and national level, more responsible business practices, and a change in social norms and consumer behaviour. We’re working with many partners in Japan and other countries to ensure people’s love of animals doesn’t harm them.


Together, we can change this

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Help build a world where people and nature thrive

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And working alongside partners, we have planted 300,000 trees and restored 2,400 hectares of degraded forest in Borneo, helping to safeguard orang-utans and other wildlife.

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Bornean orang-utans remain critically endangered, so we need to step up efforts to protect and restore their habitat.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Borneo is one of only two places in the world where orang-utans survive in the wild, along with the neighbouring island of Sumatra. But in the last 40 years their population has fallen by more than half as huge areas of their habitat have been destroyed by unsustainable logging and palm oil plantations. 

Though their number continue to fall elsewhere, the orang-utan population has stabilized in the state of Sabah in Malaysian Borneo, thanks to conservation efforts and better forest management.

One area where these efforts are really paying off is Bukit Piton. With your support, we’ve helped to restore 2,400 hectares of heavily degraded land, linking an isolated population of orang-utans with a larger area of protected habitat. Beginning in 2007, we planted more than 300,000 trees, including many of the fruit tree species that orang-utans depend on for food.

Today, Bukit Piton looks like a tropical rainforest once more. The orang-utan population appears to be healthy – the growing number of sightings of baby orang-utans in the last few years suggest it may even be increasing.  
 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

Orang-utans remain critically endangered. Fifty years ago, Borneo was home to an estimated 288,500 individuals, but by 2012 their numbers had fallen to 104,700, and the decline has continued. It’s estimated that the population could fall to 47,000 by 2025.

Habitat destruction, particularly for palm oil, remains the main threat to their survival. Orang-utans are also sometimes killed when they stray into agricultural areas.

We’re determined to fight these threats to one of humankind’s closest living relatives and to reverse their decline – just like we’ve done in Bukit Piton.

 

 Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Borneo is one of only two places in the world where orang-utans survive in the wild, along with the neighbouring island of Sumatra. But in the last 40 years their population has fallen by more than half as huge areas of their habitat have been destroyed by unsustainable logging and palm oil plantations. 

Though their number continue to fall elsewhere, the orang-utan population has stabilized in the state of Sabah in Malaysian Borneo, thanks to conservation efforts and better forest management.

One area where these efforts are really paying off is Bukit Piton. With your support, we’ve helped to restore 2,400 hectares of heavily degraded land, linking an isolated population of orang-utans with a larger area of protected habitat. Beginning in 2007, we planted more than 300,000 trees, including many of the fruit tree species that orang-utans depend on for food.

Today, Bukit Piton looks like a tropical rainforest once more. The orang-utan population appears to be healthy – the growing number of sightings of baby orang-utans in the last few years suggest it may even be increasing.  
 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

Orang-utans remain critically endangered. Fifty years ago, Borneo was home to an estimated 288,500 individuals, but by 2012 their numbers had fallen to 104,700, and the decline has continued. It’s estimated that the population could fall to 47,000 by 2025.

Habitat destruction, particularly for palm oil, remains the main threat to their survival. Orang-utans are also sometimes killed when they stray into agricultural areas.

We’re determined to fight these threats to one of humankind’s closest living relatives and to reverse their decline – just like we’ve done in Bukit Piton.

 

 Together, we can change this

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We worked with herders, children and other local community members to bring 16 natural springs back to life – so vital for people, livestock and wildlife such as the critically endangered Mongolian saiga antelope.

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Climate change and desertification continue to threaten these water sources – so we want to save 100 more.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Since the ice age, Mongolian saiga antelope have roamed the country’s vast steppes. It’s a dry landscape, but hundreds of springs provide life-giving water for wildlife, herder communities and their livestock.

In the 1990s, some 548 natural springs were found across the Mongolian saiga habitat, sustaining all living creatures in the area. But desert areas are expanding as a result of climate change and overgrazing, and at least 81 of those springs have gone. As competition for water resources heats up, the critically endangered Mongolian saiga and other wildlife are pushed further into arid areas, where grazing is poor. 

In 2008, we started working with herders, children from local eco-clubs and other community members to conserve and restore their springs. Over the next decade, 16 natural springs were reborn in semi-arid areas inhabited by Mongolian saiga. 

As well as benefiting wildlife, these efforts have helped secure drinking water for local communities and their livestock – a win-win for people and nature.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

Mongolia’s springs have sustained herder communities and saiga for millennia – but climate change presents a huge threat to their continued existence. At the same time, conserving springs can help to mitigate climate change as it prevents peatlands from drying out and the permafrost beneath from thawing – which releases large amounts of locked-up carbon.

Better management of grazing and water use can also help to increase the resilience of water supplies and prevent further encroachment of the desert.

Our aim is to safeguard another 100 springs for 1,000 herder families and 10,000 Mongolian saiga antelope.  

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Since the ice age, Mongolian saiga antelope have roamed the country’s vast steppes. It’s a dry landscape, but hundreds of springs provide life-giving water for wildlife, herder communities and their livestock.

In the 1990s, some 548 natural springs were found across the Mongolian saiga habitat, sustaining all living creatures in the area. But desert areas are expanding as a result of climate change and overgrazing, and at least 81 of those springs have gone. As competition for water resources heats up, the critically endangered Mongolian saiga and other wildlife are pushed further into arid areas, where grazing is poor. 

In 2008, we started working with herders, children from local eco-clubs and other community members to conserve and restore their springs. Over the next decade, 16 natural springs were reborn in semi-arid areas inhabited by Mongolian saiga. 

As well as benefiting wildlife, these efforts have helped secure drinking water for local communities and their livestock – a win-win for people and nature.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

Mongolia’s springs have sustained herder communities and saiga for millennia – but climate change presents a huge threat to their continued existence. At the same time, conserving springs can help to mitigate climate change as it prevents peatlands from drying out and the permafrost beneath from thawing – which releases large amounts of locked-up carbon.

Better management of grazing and water use can also help to increase the resilience of water supplies and prevent further encroachment of the desert.

Our aim is to safeguard another 100 springs for 1,000 herder families and 10,000 Mongolian saiga antelope.  

Together, we can change this

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We’ve helped stop elephant poaching for three consecutive years in key locations in Myanmar.

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Elephants continue to be poached in other areas.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

Seventy years ago, Myanmar was home to as many as 9,000 wild elephants. Today, there are fewer than 2,000 due to poaching, loss of habitat and retaliatory killings as a result of human-elephant conflict. 

In 2017, the rate of wild elephant poaching increased dramatically, with at least one elephant being killed every week. Traditionally elephants were poached for their tusks, but this suddenly changed as a surge in demand for elephant skins led to an increase in poaching and illegal trade.

In response, we brought multiple groups together to increase patrolling and raise public awareness. 

And it made a massive difference. In the key regions of Bago and Yangon, there’s been no elephant poaching for three consecutive years, while Ayeyarwady has marked a full year of zero poaching. It’s an impressive achievement, showing what can be done through strong collaboration.
  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Although Ayeyarwady, Bago and Yangon regions have achieved the goal of zero poaching, elephants in other parts of Myanmar are still being poached for their skins. And elephants remain threatened by habitat fragmentation and conflict with humans. 

We’re more committed than ever to halting elephant poaching in priority protected areas in Myanmar, covering 8.9 million hectares. We’re also working to create more protected areas. And we want more people to better understand the importance of protecting wild elephants, which play their part in maintaining the healthy ecosystems that all of us depend upon. 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

Seventy years ago, Myanmar was home to as many as 9,000 wild elephants. Today, there are fewer than 2,000 due to poaching, loss of habitat and retaliatory killings as a result of human-elephant conflict. 

In 2017, the rate of wild elephant poaching increased dramatically, with at least one elephant being killed every week. Traditionally elephants were poached for their tusks, but this suddenly changed as a surge in demand for elephant skins led to an increase in poaching and illegal trade.

In response, we brought multiple groups together to increase patrolling and raise public awareness. 

And it made a massive difference. In the key regions of Bago and Yangon, there’s been no elephant poaching for three consecutive years, while Ayeyarwady has marked a full year of zero poaching. It’s an impressive achievement, showing what can be done through strong collaboration.
  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Although Ayeyarwady, Bago and Yangon regions have achieved the goal of zero poaching, elephants in other parts of Myanmar are still being poached for their skins. And elephants remain threatened by habitat fragmentation and conflict with humans. 

We’re more committed than ever to halting elephant poaching in priority protected areas in Myanmar, covering 8.9 million hectares. We’re also working to create more protected areas. And we want more people to better understand the importance of protecting wild elephants, which play their part in maintaining the healthy ecosystems that all of us depend upon. 

Together, we can change this

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We’ve helped bring renewable energy to over 1,100 far-flung communities in the Philippines – important steps forward for the future of people and nature.

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Many other communities remain off the grid and in the dark.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

Many Filipinos live in remote island communities cut off from local power grids. Without access to electricity, these communities struggle with livelihood insecurity, are more vulnerable to changing climates, and are less able to safeguard the natural world around them. 

For years, we’ve worked to bring renewable electricity to these off-grid communities. Through our various projects, we’ve brought reliable electricity to 1,128 remote communities across the country. And we’ve provided training and support with technology to help them put their electricity to use in shoring up their communities and enhancing their livelihoods.

Where before households would spend a big chunk of their daily income on noxious kerosene fuel to light their homes, solar panels enable them to store up savings that will help them cope with extreme weather, rising sea levels and other impacts of climate change.

Thanks to this initiative, thousands of Filipinos are better equipped to create a brighter future for themselves and for future generations.  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

Projections on the climate crisis remain dire. As temperatures soar, island communities will increasingly face deadly storms, failing crops and a host of other impacts. 

An estimated 17,000 small towns across the Philippines still don’t have access to electricity. Without the means to build their disaster resilience, these communities remain exposed and at risk. A single storm can be enough to plunge them deeper into poverty.

As we fight the climate crisis, it’s vital that we support the most vulnerable among us and build a climate-smart future for all. 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

Many Filipinos live in remote island communities cut off from local power grids. Without access to electricity, these communities struggle with livelihood insecurity, are more vulnerable to changing climates, and are less able to safeguard the natural world around them. 

For years, we’ve worked to bring renewable electricity to these off-grid communities. Through our various projects, we’ve brought reliable electricity to 1,128 remote communities across the country. And we’ve provided training and support with technology to help them put their electricity to use in shoring up their communities and enhancing their livelihoods.

Where before households would spend a big chunk of their daily income on noxious kerosene fuel to light their homes, solar panels enable them to store up savings that will help them cope with extreme weather, rising sea levels and other impacts of climate change.

Thanks to this initiative, thousands of Filipinos are better equipped to create a brighter future for themselves and for future generations.  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

Projections on the climate crisis remain dire. As temperatures soar, island communities will increasingly face deadly storms, failing crops and a host of other impacts. 

An estimated 17,000 small towns across the Philippines still don’t have access to electricity. Without the means to build their disaster resilience, these communities remain exposed and at risk. A single storm can be enough to plunge them deeper into poverty.

As we fight the climate crisis, it’s vital that we support the most vulnerable among us and build a climate-smart future for all. 

Together, we can change this

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WITH YOUR SUPPORT

And working alongside communities, governments and partners in Europe, we have created the world’s first five-country protected river landscape.

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New hydropower developments, artificial channels and sediment extraction still threaten this UNESCO reserve for the rivers Danube, Drava and Mura.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

It’s known as the “Amazon of Europe” – a 700km green belt connecting almost a million hectares of priceless landscapes. And, thanks to your help and the support of many partners, this spectacular landscape has become the world’s first five-country UNESCO Biosphere Reserve – a symbol of unity and recognition of its ecological and cultural importance.

Spanning Austria, Croatia, Hungary, Serbia and Slovenia, the proposed Mura-Drava-Danube Biosphere Reserve covers the lower courses of the Drava and Mura rivers and related sections of the Danube. Connecting 13 protected areas, this stunning river landscape includes large floodplain forests, gravel and sand banks, oxbow lakes – and amazingly rich wildlife. 

Every year, more than 250,000 migratory waterfowls use the rivers to rest and to feed. The area is also home to the highest breeding density in continental Europe of many endangered species, including little terns, black storks and the nearly extinct sterlet, as well as beavers and otters.

The landscape is also home to almost a million people, and is vital for their livelihoods and well-being. Large floodplains lower the risks from floods, and the natural landscape provides and purifies the water that people and agriculture depend on.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

The Amazon of Europe remains under threat from damaging development. Extraction of sand and gravel from the riverbed, artificial changes to river channels and new hydropower all cause devastating environmental impacts. 

As well as harming nature, these activities will cause long-term economic damage as groundwater levels drop, meaning riverside forests dry out and agricultural lands become less productive.

We’re working with partners to find better solutions that will protect and restore rivers, wetlands and other natural landscapes in the Mura-Drava-Danube, while contributing to the prosperity and well-being of local people.  

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

It’s known as the “Amazon of Europe” – a 700km green belt connecting almost a million hectares of priceless landscapes. And, thanks to your help and the support of many partners, this spectacular landscape has become the world’s first five-country UNESCO Biosphere Reserve – a symbol of unity and recognition of its ecological and cultural importance.

Spanning Austria, Croatia, Hungary, Serbia and Slovenia, the proposed Mura-Drava-Danube Biosphere Reserve covers the lower courses of the Drava and Mura rivers and related sections of the Danube. Connecting 13 protected areas, this stunning river landscape includes large floodplain forests, gravel and sand banks, oxbow lakes – and amazingly rich wildlife. 

Every year, more than 250,000 migratory waterfowls use the rivers to rest and to feed. The area is also home to the highest breeding density in continental Europe of many endangered species, including little terns, black storks and the nearly extinct sterlet, as well as beavers and otters.

The landscape is also home to almost a million people, and is vital for their livelihoods and well-being. Large floodplains lower the risks from floods, and the natural landscape provides and purifies the water that people and agriculture depend on.

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

The Amazon of Europe remains under threat from damaging development. Extraction of sand and gravel from the riverbed, artificial changes to river channels and new hydropower all cause devastating environmental impacts. 

As well as harming nature, these activities will cause long-term economic damage as groundwater levels drop, meaning riverside forests dry out and agricultural lands become less productive.

We’re working with partners to find better solutions that will protect and restore rivers, wetlands and other natural landscapes in the Mura-Drava-Danube, while contributing to the prosperity and well-being of local people.  

Together, we can change this

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We rescued 10 free-flowing, pristine Alpine rivers in Austria from destructive hydropower projects in the past 20 years.

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Half of all naturally flowing Alpine rivers in Austria remain unprotected and under threat.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

The Alps are one of the last great natural areas in Europe. With their unique biodiversity, they are a vital retreat for nature. 

 

The sparkling rivers that cut through the landscape are also vital for nature and people – yet only 15% of Alpine rivers remain in a natural state. Dams and other developments damage and disconnect wildlife habitats and impede the rivers’ natural flow patterns and processes.

 

In Austria, protecting the remaining river landscapes and restoring rivers that have already been obstructed is one of our most urgent tasks. In the past 20 years, we’ve been able to prevent the construction of harmful hydropower plants on 10 important rivers including the Lech, the Inn, the Mur and the Isel, which would have caused irreversible damage to these rivers and the landscapes they sustain.

 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

The pressure on Austria’s few remaining free-flowing rivers has increased further in recent years. Right now, hundreds of new power plants are planned in Austria – some even in protected areas.

 

Many of the planned dams are very small. But while the energy they could supply is negligible, the potential damage is huge.   

 

While we support a switch to renewable energy, destructive hydropower plants aren’t the way forward. Already, Austrian rivers have a barrier every 600m on average. Any further hydropower development in the last free-flowing rivers would mean the end of wild rivers and the outstanding Alpine river biodiversity in Austria.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

The Alps are one of the last great natural areas in Europe. With their unique biodiversity, they are a vital retreat for nature. 

 

The sparkling rivers that cut through the landscape are also vital for nature and people – yet only 15% of Alpine rivers remain in a natural state. Dams and other developments damage and disconnect wildlife habitats and impede the rivers’ natural flow patterns and processes.

 

In Austria, protecting the remaining river landscapes and restoring rivers that have already been obstructed is one of our most urgent tasks. In the past 20 years, we’ve been able to prevent the construction of harmful hydropower plants on 10 important rivers including the Lech, the Inn, the Mur and the Isel, which would have caused irreversible damage to these rivers and the landscapes they sustain.

 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

The pressure on Austria’s few remaining free-flowing rivers has increased further in recent years. Right now, hundreds of new power plants are planned in Austria – some even in protected areas.

 

Many of the planned dams are very small. But while the energy they could supply is negligible, the potential damage is huge.   

 

While we support a switch to renewable energy, destructive hydropower plants aren’t the way forward. Already, Austrian rivers have a barrier every 600m on average. Any further hydropower development in the last free-flowing rivers would mean the end of wild rivers and the outstanding Alpine river biodiversity in Austria.

 

Together, we can change this

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We’ve strengthened the leadership of Indigenous peoples and local communities in Colombia to effectively govern and conserve their ancestral territories.

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Threats such as deforestation, illegal mining and land grabbing still endanger their culture and territories.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Home to around 10% of all known species, Colombia is the most biodiverse country on Earth relative to its size. For centuries, Colombia’s Indigenous peoples and other local communities have helped to conserve this natural richness – but their rights and their role in conservation haven’t always been respected and recognized.

For many years, we’ve been backing the efforts of Indigenous peoples and other local communities to assert their rights and have a greater say in the way their lands are used. They have gone on to negotiate agreements with government and private companies over natural resources, and participate in planning and decision-making processes. As part of this, we’ve supported over 200 conservation agreements that benefit local communities. 

We’ve also supported Indigenous communities to use their ancestral knowledge to demonstrate the important benefits their territories provide to people and nature. This helps build a stronger case for protecting these lands from extractive industries and other threats, and also fed into negotiations between the Colombian Amazon Indigenous Peoples Organization and the national government over the national development plan. 

 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Deforestation, illegal mining, land grabbing and other threats still endanger the culture, territories and security of hundreds of communities in Colombia. According to Global Witness, Colombia is the world's most dangerous country for defenders of rights to land, territory and the environment. In 2020 alone, 65 environmental leaders were murdered.

Local communities continue to suffer from poverty, economic inequality and racial injustice, with climate change and  loss of nature only making things worse. 

Despite the crucial role they play and the dangers they increasingly face, there is a lack of action to safeguard their lives and livelihoods. 

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Home to around 10% of all known species, Colombia is the most biodiverse country on Earth relative to its size. For centuries, Colombia’s Indigenous peoples and other local communities have helped to conserve this natural richness – but their rights and their role in conservation haven’t always been respected and recognized.

For many years, we’ve been backing the efforts of Indigenous peoples and other local communities to assert their rights and have a greater say in the way their lands are used. They have gone on to negotiate agreements with government and private companies over natural resources, and participate in planning and decision-making processes. As part of this, we’ve supported over 200 conservation agreements that benefit local communities. 

We’ve also supported Indigenous communities to use their ancestral knowledge to demonstrate the important benefits their territories provide to people and nature. This helps build a stronger case for protecting these lands from extractive industries and other threats, and also fed into negotiations between the Colombian Amazon Indigenous Peoples Organization and the national government over the national development plan. 

 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Deforestation, illegal mining, land grabbing and other threats still endanger the culture, territories and security of hundreds of communities in Colombia. According to Global Witness, Colombia is the world's most dangerous country for defenders of rights to land, territory and the environment. In 2020 alone, 65 environmental leaders were murdered.

Local communities continue to suffer from poverty, economic inequality and racial injustice, with climate change and  loss of nature only making things worse. 

Despite the crucial role they play and the dangers they increasingly face, there is a lack of action to safeguard their lives and livelihoods. 

 

Together, we can change this

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And the leadership of Indigenous peoples and the Peruvian government, a total of almost 2.5 million hectares of Indigenous territories have been secured in the Peruvian Amazon.

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Traditional communities still struggle to have their rights recognized and to safeguard their territories.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

For generations, Indigenous peoples around the world have lived in harmony with nature. Their customary lands contain much of the world’s most important biodiversity, and recent assessments suggest that the environment is in good health across more than 90% of Indigenous areas. By protecting Indigenous territories, we also conserve the natural world.

This is especially true in Peru – one of the top 10 most biodiverse countries in the world. The Amazonian Indigenous peoples of Peru have long strived to maintain their home and their way of life, and to have their rights recognized.

Over the last five years, we’ve worked together with Indigenous peoples and their organizations in Peru to secure the legal ownership of almost 2.5 million hectares of communal territories and Indigenous territorial reserves. This empowers Indigenous communities to manage their lands, forests and rivers and safeguard them against external threats.

We’ve also supported 44 indigenous enterprises in the Peruvian Amazon, helping strengthen the Indigenous economy and improve the quality of life of 119 native communities.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Despite this recent progress, Peru’s Indigenous peoples continue to struggle to have their rights recognized and to protect their territories – particularly against threats such as illegal gold mining, illegal logging, among others. 

Yet because of their courage and resilience, they remain strong. With your help, we’ll continue to support Indigenous peoples to achieve legal recognition for their lands, to have their voices heard, to strengthen their way of life and to maintain the natural environment that we all depend on.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

For generations, Indigenous peoples around the world have lived in harmony with nature. Their customary lands contain much of the world’s most important biodiversity, and recent assessments suggest that the environment is in good health across more than 90% of Indigenous areas. By protecting Indigenous territories, we also conserve the natural world.

This is especially true in Peru – one of the top 10 most biodiverse countries in the world. The Amazonian Indigenous peoples of Peru have long strived to maintain their home and their way of life, and to have their rights recognized.

Over the last five years, we’ve worked together with Indigenous peoples and their organizations in Peru to secure the legal ownership of almost 2.5 million hectares of communal territories and Indigenous territorial reserves. This empowers Indigenous communities to manage their lands, forests and rivers and safeguard them against external threats.

We’ve also supported 44 indigenous enterprises in the Peruvian Amazon, helping strengthen the Indigenous economy and improve the quality of life of 119 native communities.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Despite this recent progress, Peru’s Indigenous peoples continue to struggle to have their rights recognized and to protect their territories – particularly against threats such as illegal gold mining, illegal logging, among others. 

Yet because of their courage and resilience, they remain strong. With your help, we’ll continue to support Indigenous peoples to achieve legal recognition for their lands, to have their voices heard, to strengthen their way of life and to maintain the natural environment that we all depend on.

 

Together, we can change this

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We've helped ensure over 60 million hectares of protected areas in the Brazilian Amazon are being managed effectively.

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Deforestation and fires caused by land grabbing still threaten the people and biodiversity of the world’s largest rainforest.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The Amazon is the world’s largest rainforest. It’s home to more species than anywhere else on Earth, plays a crucial role in the global climate and has been home to Indigenous peoples for countless generations.

Protected areas can play a vital role in conserving this priceless heritage – but only if they’re managed effectively. That’s why, in 2002, we joined the Brazilian Ministry of the Environment and other partners to form the Amazon Region Protected Areas (ARPA) programme – the world’s largest tropical forest conservation initiative.  

ARPA aims to build a network of effective protected areas across the Brazilian Amazon. Working closely with local communities, it invests in creating, expanding, connecting and maintaining protected areas. It also provides the resources protected areas need to function effectively, now and in the future.

By 2017, ARPA was supporting more than 60 million hectares of rainforest under legal protection, helping to safeguard the future of over 15% of the Brazilian Amazon.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

After slowing during the last decade, deforestation is on the rise again in Brazil. More than a million hectares of Amazon rainforest was destroyed in 2019 and again in 2020, and it looks like 2021 will be just as bad.

About 10% of this deforestation took place within protected areas. Despite better management, protected areas remain vulnerable to land grabbing and other illegal activities. Linked to these is an alarming rise in forest fires, with catastrophic consequences. 

The destruction of the Brazilian Amazon threatens countless plant and animal species as well as the cultures and livelihoods of Indigenous peoples and local communities. It also causes air pollution, jeopardizes the country’s water and energy security, and worsens the climate crisis. 

We have to halt and reverse this trend before it’s too late.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The Amazon is the world’s largest rainforest. It’s home to more species than anywhere else on Earth, plays a crucial role in the global climate and has been home to Indigenous peoples for countless generations.

Protected areas can play a vital role in conserving this priceless heritage – but only if they’re managed effectively. That’s why, in 2002, we joined the Brazilian Ministry of the Environment and other partners to form the Amazon Region Protected Areas (ARPA) programme – the world’s largest tropical forest conservation initiative.  

ARPA aims to build a network of effective protected areas across the Brazilian Amazon. Working closely with local communities, it invests in creating, expanding, connecting and maintaining protected areas. It also provides the resources protected areas need to function effectively, now and in the future.

By 2017, ARPA was supporting more than 60 million hectares of rainforest under legal protection, helping to safeguard the future of over 15% of the Brazilian Amazon.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

After slowing during the last decade, deforestation is on the rise again in Brazil. More than a million hectares of Amazon rainforest was destroyed in 2019 and again in 2020, and it looks like 2021 will be just as bad.

About 10% of this deforestation took place within protected areas. Despite better management, protected areas remain vulnerable to land grabbing and other illegal activities. Linked to these is an alarming rise in forest fires, with catastrophic consequences. 

The destruction of the Brazilian Amazon threatens countless plant and animal species as well as the cultures and livelihoods of Indigenous peoples and local communities. It also causes air pollution, jeopardizes the country’s water and energy security, and worsens the climate crisis. 

We have to halt and reverse this trend before it’s too late.

 

Together, we can change this

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And by working closely with local communities, we’ve protected the habitats of tigers and other endangered species in the Dawna Tenasserim landscape along the Thailand-Myanmar border.

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Poaching, road building and other developments mean the fate of wildlife in the region hangs in the balance.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The Dawna Tenasserim landscape, straddling the border of Myanmar and Thailand, is one of the most important wildlife refuges in Southeast Asia. Its forests and mountains are home to important populations of tigers, Asian elephants and thousands of other species, as well as being the source of many of the region’s major rivers and supporting the livelihoods of diverse ethnic communities. 

 

For years, we’ve been working with various partners to secure the future of this vital landscape. We’ve helped create and connect one of the largest networks of protected areas in Southeast Asia to safeguard the habitats of tigers, elephants and other threatened wildlife. And we’re helping to ensure these areas are well managed, including by monitoring wildlife populations and supporting anti-poaching efforts.

 

At the same time, we’ve been working with local villagers to conserve the forest landscape while enabling them to strengthen their own livelihoods, including by providing support and guidance in sustainable forest management.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Although the Dawna Tenasserim landscape is increasingly recognized as a global conservation priority, we’re in a race against time to secure its future.

A rapidly growing economy is putting immense pressure on the wilderness. Forests are being cleared to make way for agriculture, and becoming degraded by unsustainable logging and fragmented by infrastructure development, like the construction of road networks, pipelines and dams. Poaching is also a serious threat to some species. 

It’s vital that economic development in the region doesn’t come at the expense of nature and the priceless benefits it provides. By working with governments, businesses and local people in Dawna Tenasserim and across the Greater Mekong, we aim to build a green economy where people and nature thrive.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The Dawna Tenasserim landscape, straddling the border of Myanmar and Thailand, is one of the most important wildlife refuges in Southeast Asia. Its forests and mountains are home to important populations of tigers, Asian elephants and thousands of other species, as well as being the source of many of the region’s major rivers and supporting the livelihoods of diverse ethnic communities. 

 

For years, we’ve been working with various partners to secure the future of this vital landscape. We’ve helped create and connect one of the largest networks of protected areas in Southeast Asia to safeguard the habitats of tigers, elephants and other threatened wildlife. And we’re helping to ensure these areas are well managed, including by monitoring wildlife populations and supporting anti-poaching efforts.

 

At the same time, we’ve been working with local villagers to conserve the forest landscape while enabling them to strengthen their own livelihoods, including by providing support and guidance in sustainable forest management.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Although the Dawna Tenasserim landscape is increasingly recognized as a global conservation priority, we’re in a race against time to secure its future.

A rapidly growing economy is putting immense pressure on the wilderness. Forests are being cleared to make way for agriculture, and becoming degraded by unsustainable logging and fragmented by infrastructure development, like the construction of road networks, pipelines and dams. Poaching is also a serious threat to some species. 

It’s vital that economic development in the region doesn’t come at the expense of nature and the priceless benefits it provides. By working with governments, businesses and local people in Dawna Tenasserim and across the Greater Mekong, we aim to build a green economy where people and nature thrive.

 

Together, we can change this

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We successfully called on the Zambian government to protect the Luangwa River and halt the development of a damaging hydropower dam.

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80% of freshwater ecosystems in Zambia remain unprotected – more action is needed to protect these vitally important environments for people and wildlife.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

At over 1,000km long, the Luangwa River is one of the longest free-flowing rivers in southern Africa and a lifeline for people and wildlife in Zambia. As well as providing water for 25 communities, it supports a wealth of wildlife, including the country’s only black rhinos. The national parks that the Luangwa River flows through are also home to elephants, lions, hippos, leopards, African wild dogs, the endemic Thornicroft’s giraffe and over 400 species of birds.

But all this was threatened by plans to build a massive hydropower dam.

So in 2017, WWF and partners petitioned the President of Zambia to protect the Luangwa River. Close to 200,000 people worldwide signed the petition, amplifying the concerns of the 25 communities.

The government listened, and in 2019 it cancelled the dam. Now, we’re in the process of getting the government to formally declare the Luangwa River as a “water resource protection area”. As well as preventing any future dams, this would protect the river from other threats such as unsustainable agriculture and deforestation.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Worldwide, populations of freshwater species have fallen by an average of 83% over the past half-century – a steeper decline than for wildlife on land or in the sea. Only around a third of the world’s rivers remain free-flowing.

In Zambia, just 20% of freshwater ecosystems are protected, leaving the rest at risk of damaging developments that could jeopardize the future of the people and wildlife that depend upon them.

So we’re working with communities, government, civil society organizations, public and private sector partners and research institutions to create a network of science-backed and well-managed water resource protected areas in Zambia. 

We’re also working with government and investors to support the development of alternative sources of renewable energy, like solar power.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

At over 1,000km long, the Luangwa River is one of the longest free-flowing rivers in southern Africa and a lifeline for people and wildlife in Zambia. As well as providing water for 25 communities, it supports a wealth of wildlife, including the country’s only black rhinos. The national parks that the Luangwa River flows through are also home to elephants, lions, hippos, leopards, African wild dogs, the endemic Thornicroft’s giraffe and over 400 species of birds.

But all this was threatened by plans to build a massive hydropower dam.

So in 2017, WWF and partners petitioned the President of Zambia to protect the Luangwa River. Close to 200,000 people worldwide signed the petition, amplifying the concerns of the 25 communities.

The government listened, and in 2019 it cancelled the dam. Now, we’re in the process of getting the government to formally declare the Luangwa River as a “water resource protection area”. As well as preventing any future dams, this would protect the river from other threats such as unsustainable agriculture and deforestation.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Worldwide, populations of freshwater species have fallen by an average of 83% over the past half-century – a steeper decline than for wildlife on land or in the sea. Only around a third of the world’s rivers remain free-flowing.

In Zambia, just 20% of freshwater ecosystems are protected, leaving the rest at risk of damaging developments that could jeopardize the future of the people and wildlife that depend upon them.

So we’re working with communities, government, civil society organizations, public and private sector partners and research institutions to create a network of science-backed and well-managed water resource protected areas in Zambia. 

We’re also working with government and investors to support the development of alternative sources of renewable energy, like solar power.

 

Together, we can change this

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And working alongside our partners, we supported sustainable agricultural practices that improved incomes and food security for about 15,000 people in Zimbabwe – and helped prevent forest destruction.

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Climate change and soil degradation remain a threat to many farmers in Zimbabwe.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) landscape, which encompasses five countries in southern Africa, is the largest land-based conservation area in the world that crosses frontiers. It’s immensely rich in biodiversity, including about half of Africa’s elephant population, but many of its human inhabitants live in poverty. 

 

With poor soils and scarce water, opportunities for smallholder farmers are limited. Producing more food used to mean clearing more areas of forests, bringing people and wildlife into conflict. But we’re helping to change that.

 

With our partners, we’ve provided training in conservation agriculture for more than 1,000 smallholders living alongside protected areas in Zimbabwe. By growing drought-tolerant crops and adopting smarter farming practices, farmers are now producing significantly higher yields on less land. This has increased their incomes and improved food security for around 15,000 people within their communities. 

 

It’s also encouraged them to be advocates for conservation, helping to improve relations between local people and the nearby national parks.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

There’s an urgent need to expand this conservation agriculture approach. Zimbabwe has struggled with drought for several years, and the situation is only likely to get worse as the climate crisis deepens. Conventional farming practices also lead to diminishing yields as soils become degraded.

 

Human-wildlife conflict is also a growing problem, particularly in the buffer zones alongside national parks. Wild animals raiding crops or preying on livestock are a threat to people’s livelihoods and food security, and the issue can undermine support for conservation efforts.

 

We’re determined to continue our efforts to support communities to improve their livelihoods and food security, and to tackle human-wildlife conflict so that people and wildlife can thrive side by side.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The Kavango-Zambezi (KAZA) landscape, which encompasses five countries in southern Africa, is the largest land-based conservation area in the world that crosses frontiers. It’s immensely rich in biodiversity, including about half of Africa’s elephant population, but many of its human inhabitants live in poverty. 

 

With poor soils and scarce water, opportunities for smallholder farmers are limited. Producing more food used to mean clearing more areas of forests, bringing people and wildlife into conflict. But we’re helping to change that.

 

With our partners, we’ve provided training in conservation agriculture for more than 1,000 smallholders living alongside protected areas in Zimbabwe. By growing drought-tolerant crops and adopting smarter farming practices, farmers are now producing significantly higher yields on less land. This has increased their incomes and improved food security for around 15,000 people within their communities. 

 

It’s also encouraged them to be advocates for conservation, helping to improve relations between local people and the nearby national parks.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

There’s an urgent need to expand this conservation agriculture approach. Zimbabwe has struggled with drought for several years, and the situation is only likely to get worse as the climate crisis deepens. Conventional farming practices also lead to diminishing yields as soils become degraded.

 

Human-wildlife conflict is also a growing problem, particularly in the buffer zones alongside national parks. Wild animals raiding crops or preying on livestock are a threat to people’s livelihoods and food security, and the issue can undermine support for conservation efforts.

 

We’re determined to continue our efforts to support communities to improve their livelihoods and food security, and to tackle human-wildlife conflict so that people and wildlife can thrive side by side.

 

Together, we can change this

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Elephant populations in Tanzania have bounced back by 40% in five years after strong efforts to tackle poaching.

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The threat of wildlife crime hasn’t gone away, and human-elephant conflict is increasing.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Tanzania is one of the strongholds of the African elephant. But between 2009 and 2014 a surge in industrial-scale poaching wiped out some 60% of the population, around 60,000 elephants.

In response to the poaching crisis in Africa, we launched a global campaign to push wildlife crime up the international agenda. Today, with support from WWF and many others, countries are doing far more to tackle the issue. And it’s making a difference. 

Tanzania is a case in point. The country has focused on going after the organized criminal syndicates behind poaching and wildlife trafficking. It’s arrested more than 20 high-level “kingpins” – including Chinese businesswoman Yang Fenlang, known as the “Ivory Queen”, who recently lost an appeal against her conviction. 

As a result, poaching has declined dramatically, and elephants are making a comeback. According to government figures, the population increased from 43,000 in 2014 to 60,000 in 2019 – a rise of 40%.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

While Tanzania is no longer the epicentre of elephant poaching and ivory trafficking, the threat hasn’t gone away. At a local level, limited resources and capacity are making it difficult to protect elephants and other wildlife from poachers.

There’s also the growing issue of human-elephant conflict. As the human population grows and natural habitats shrink, people and elephants are pushed closer together. Elephants coming into villages and raiding crops can damage people’s livelihoods and property and cause injury or even death. This in turn can lead to people killing elephants in retaliation and opposing conservation and anti-poaching efforts.

We’re working with communities to put in place solutions to the problem, so that people and elephants can thrive together.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Tanzania is one of the strongholds of the African elephant. But between 2009 and 2014 a surge in industrial-scale poaching wiped out some 60% of the population, around 60,000 elephants.

In response to the poaching crisis in Africa, we launched a global campaign to push wildlife crime up the international agenda. Today, with support from WWF and many others, countries are doing far more to tackle the issue. And it’s making a difference. 

Tanzania is a case in point. The country has focused on going after the organized criminal syndicates behind poaching and wildlife trafficking. It’s arrested more than 20 high-level “kingpins” – including Chinese businesswoman Yang Fenlang, known as the “Ivory Queen”, who recently lost an appeal against her conviction. 

As a result, poaching has declined dramatically, and elephants are making a comeback. According to government figures, the population increased from 43,000 in 2014 to 60,000 in 2019 – a rise of 40%.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

While Tanzania is no longer the epicentre of elephant poaching and ivory trafficking, the threat hasn’t gone away. At a local level, limited resources and capacity are making it difficult to protect elephants and other wildlife from poachers.

There’s also the growing issue of human-elephant conflict. As the human population grows and natural habitats shrink, people and elephants are pushed closer together. Elephants coming into villages and raiding crops can damage people’s livelihoods and property and cause injury or even death. This in turn can lead to people killing elephants in retaliation and opposing conservation and anti-poaching efforts.

We’re working with communities to put in place solutions to the problem, so that people and elephants can thrive together.

 

Together, we can change this

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We’ve put sustainable seafood firmly on the menu in South Africa by influencing consumer choices, business policies and fishing practices.

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Unsustainable fishing has left fish stocks dangerously depleted and the oceans’ natural systems in trouble.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

When consumers and businesses choose sustainable seafood, it sends a strong message to the fishing industry. Since 2004, we’ve been empowering consumers, suppliers and restaurants to make informed choices through our Southern African Sustainable Seafood Initiative (SASSI).  

With easy-to-use tools – including an app, website and pocket guide – we’ve helped raise awareness of the importance of sustainable seafood and shift demand from overexploited species to more responsible choices. SASSI uses a simple traffic light system for different seafood species: red (don’t buy), orange (think twice) and green (best choice).

More than 40% of our target consumers are now using SASSI tools, and the app has been downloaded over 25,000 times. We’ve trained more than 3,500 chefs who are now promoting sustainable seafood within the industry. And we’ve partnered with five of the six major retailers in South Africa, who have made formal commitments to sourcing sustainable seafood.

All this is leading to changes on the water as fisheries seek to raise their standards. The South African hake trawl fishery, for example, has reduced accidental seabird deaths by 99%. And two commercially important species, kingklip and carpenter, have moved from orange to green.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

The ocean provides us with tremendous economic, social and cultural benefits – from supplying food and livelihoods for hundreds of millions of people, to regulating the climate, to offering inspiration and recreation. But unsustainable fishing remains a threat to the health of the ocean we depend on. Overfishing has left many fish stocks dangerously depleted and damaged the natural systems of the oceans. Globally, more than a third of all fish stocks are overexploited. 

We’ll continue to push for positive changes across the whole seafood supply chain, from the fisheries and seafood suppliers through to restaurants, retailers and consumers. And we’ll also work to help overexploited species recover back to healthy levels.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

When consumers and businesses choose sustainable seafood, it sends a strong message to the fishing industry. Since 2004, we’ve been empowering consumers, suppliers and restaurants to make informed choices through our Southern African Sustainable Seafood Initiative (SASSI).  

With easy-to-use tools – including an app, website and pocket guide – we’ve helped raise awareness of the importance of sustainable seafood and shift demand from overexploited species to more responsible choices. SASSI uses a simple traffic light system for different seafood species: red (don’t buy), orange (think twice) and green (best choice).

More than 40% of our target consumers are now using SASSI tools, and the app has been downloaded over 25,000 times. We’ve trained more than 3,500 chefs who are now promoting sustainable seafood within the industry. And we’ve partnered with five of the six major retailers in South Africa, who have made formal commitments to sourcing sustainable seafood.

All this is leading to changes on the water as fisheries seek to raise their standards. The South African hake trawl fishery, for example, has reduced accidental seabird deaths by 99%. And two commercially important species, kingklip and carpenter, have moved from orange to green.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

The ocean provides us with tremendous economic, social and cultural benefits – from supplying food and livelihoods for hundreds of millions of people, to regulating the climate, to offering inspiration and recreation. But unsustainable fishing remains a threat to the health of the ocean we depend on. Overfishing has left many fish stocks dangerously depleted and damaged the natural systems of the oceans. Globally, more than a third of all fish stocks are overexploited. 

We’ll continue to push for positive changes across the whole seafood supply chain, from the fisheries and seafood suppliers through to restaurants, retailers and consumers. And we’ll also work to help overexploited species recover back to healthy levels.

 

Together, we can change this

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And by working closely with the government, businesses and civil society, we’ve made sustainable palm oil production the norm in Gabon.

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We need to maintain this commitment as the industry grows, and ensure that local communities benefit.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Forests cover almost nine-tenths of Gabon, and contain some of the richest biodiversity in Africa. While the country is committed to preserving this forest heritage, it also wants to grow its economy – and is seeking to become one of Africa’s main palm oil producers. 

There is a huge demand for this vegetable oil around the world for use in food, personal care products and as a biofuel. It’s vital that the palm oil industry develops in a way that doesn’t threaten Gabon’s forests and wildlife – which is why we’ve been promoting the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) standard. RSPO-certified palm oil plantations must minimize their impact on the environment and respect the rights of workers and local communities. 

Together with Gabonese civil society organizations, the private sector, researchers and the government, we’ve adapted the RSPO standard for the Gabonese context, ensuring it protects all forests that are important for nature and the climate, while recognizing the rights of local people to develop their land.

Today, Gabon is the first and, so far, the only country to adopt the RSPO standard as its national policy. Almost all palm oil concessions in the country are RSPO certified or in the process of being certified.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

It’s important to make sure the palm oil industry in Gabon continues to develop sustainably – and a key way to do that is to enable local communities to monitor palm oil operations.

In Ngounié province, we’ve helped set up a platform where civil society organizations and local communities bordering oil palm concessions can have their say. It will enable them to ensure palm oil companies are meeting their environmental, social and human rights obligations – which include commitments to support community development and create opportunities for smallholders.

We aim to create similar platforms in all palm oil growing areas across the country. And we’ll continue to work with civil society, government, private sector and financial partners to ensure Gabon’s palm oil industry benefits people without damaging nature.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Forests cover almost nine-tenths of Gabon, and contain some of the richest biodiversity in Africa. While the country is committed to preserving this forest heritage, it also wants to grow its economy – and is seeking to become one of Africa’s main palm oil producers. 

There is a huge demand for this vegetable oil around the world for use in food, personal care products and as a biofuel. It’s vital that the palm oil industry develops in a way that doesn’t threaten Gabon’s forests and wildlife – which is why we’ve been promoting the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) standard. RSPO-certified palm oil plantations must minimize their impact on the environment and respect the rights of workers and local communities. 

Together with Gabonese civil society organizations, the private sector, researchers and the government, we’ve adapted the RSPO standard for the Gabonese context, ensuring it protects all forests that are important for nature and the climate, while recognizing the rights of local people to develop their land.

Today, Gabon is the first and, so far, the only country to adopt the RSPO standard as its national policy. Almost all palm oil concessions in the country are RSPO certified or in the process of being certified.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

It’s important to make sure the palm oil industry in Gabon continues to develop sustainably – and a key way to do that is to enable local communities to monitor palm oil operations.

In Ngounié province, we’ve helped set up a platform where civil society organizations and local communities bordering oil palm concessions can have their say. It will enable them to ensure palm oil companies are meeting their environmental, social and human rights obligations – which include commitments to support community development and create opportunities for smallholders.

We aim to create similar platforms in all palm oil growing areas across the country. And we’ll continue to work with civil society, government, private sector and financial partners to ensure Gabon’s palm oil industry benefits people without damaging nature.

 

Together, we can change this

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WITH YOUR SUPPORT

And with the help of local fishers, we’ve established the first ever fishing-free zones in Croatia.

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In the coming decade, we need to effectively protect 30% of the Adriatic Sea, as well as other seas around the world, to preserve our sea life for future generations.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The Amazon is the world’s largest rainforest. It’s home to more species than anywhere else on Earth, plays a crucial role in the global climate and has been home to Indigenous peoples for countless generations.

Protected areas can play a vital role in conserving this priceless heritage – but only if they’re managed effectively. That’s why, in 2002, we joined the Brazilian Ministry of the Environment and other partners to form the Amazon Region Protected Areas (ARPA) programme – the world’s largest tropical forest conservation initiative.  

The Adriatic Sea has been an abundant source of food for the many civilisations that have flourished along its crystal-clear coastline. From Illyrians, Greeks and Romans through to the tourists who flock to Croatia’s islands and beaches today… all have enjoyed fresh fish from the beautiful deep blue waters.

The first written mention of Croatian fishing goes back to the 10th century from the shores of Dugi Otok – home today to the marine protected area of Telašćica. And it’s here that, together with the government, nature park authorities and local fishers, we helped establish Croatia’s first fishing-free area, or no-take zone. 

Local fishers themselves have supported the move: rather than seeing it as a restriction on their way of life, they recognize that protecting key habitats is crucial for allowing fish stocks to replenish for the future.

It’s a great example of co-management of marine resources by local people and conservationists – one of the first of its kind in the Mediterranean, and of only a few in the world.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

More than 80% of fish stocks in the Mediterranean have been overfished, threatening the future of coastal communities and marine life across the region, including in the Adriatic.

Today, less than 10% of the Mediterranean Sea is designated for protection – and only a tiny fraction of that is being effectively managed like Telašćica.

We’re calling for a network of effective protected areas covering 30% of the Mediterranean Sea by 2030. But these areas will only make a difference if local communities, and fishers in particular, support them and have a say in how they’re managed.

We’re continuing to cooperate with local people to build trust, listen to their concerns and develop joint solutions to secure the future of the Adriatic Sea.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The Amazon is the world’s largest rainforest. It’s home to more species than anywhere else on Earth, plays a crucial role in the global climate and has been home to Indigenous peoples for countless generations.

Protected areas can play a vital role in conserving this priceless heritage – but only if they’re managed effectively. That’s why, in 2002, we joined the Brazilian Ministry of the Environment and other partners to form the Amazon Region Protected Areas (ARPA) programme – the world’s largest tropical forest conservation initiative.  

The Adriatic Sea has been an abundant source of food for the many civilisations that have flourished along its crystal-clear coastline. From Illyrians, Greeks and Romans through to the tourists who flock to Croatia’s islands and beaches today… all have enjoyed fresh fish from the beautiful deep blue waters.

The first written mention of Croatian fishing goes back to the 10th century from the shores of Dugi Otok – home today to the marine protected area of Telašćica. And it’s here that, together with the government, nature park authorities and local fishers, we helped establish Croatia’s first fishing-free area, or no-take zone. 

Local fishers themselves have supported the move: rather than seeing it as a restriction on their way of life, they recognize that protecting key habitats is crucial for allowing fish stocks to replenish for the future.

It’s a great example of co-management of marine resources by local people and conservationists – one of the first of its kind in the Mediterranean, and of only a few in the world.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

More than 80% of fish stocks in the Mediterranean have been overfished, threatening the future of coastal communities and marine life across the region, including in the Adriatic.

Today, less than 10% of the Mediterranean Sea is designated for protection – and only a tiny fraction of that is being effectively managed like Telašćica.

We’re calling for a network of effective protected areas covering 30% of the Mediterranean Sea by 2030. But these areas will only make a difference if local communities, and fishers in particular, support them and have a say in how they’re managed.

We’re continuing to cooperate with local people to build trust, listen to their concerns and develop joint solutions to secure the future of the Adriatic Sea.

 

Together, we can change this

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In Greece, we secured one of the Mediterranean’s most important nesting beaches for the loggerhead sea turtle.

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Sea turtle species continue to face many threats, ranging from plastic pollution to habitat destruction.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Sekania beach on the Greek island of Zakynthos is just 500m long. But as one of the most important sites for the loggerhead sea turtle, it’s been a beacon of hope for conservation action for almost 30 years.

Sekania is perhaps the most important “maternity ward” for loggerhead sea turtles in the whole Mediterranean. This single beach hosts up to 1,000 nests every season, representing one of the highest global nesting densities for this threatened species. 

In an effort to safeguard this unique beach from the impact of mass tourism and coastal development, in 1994 we made the bold decision to purchase the land surrounding it. With the help of thousands of supporters from throughout Europe, we were able to find the funds to secure Sekania. 

Five years later, the broader area was designated as a marine park with Sekania at its heart. And these conservation efforts have paid off: while loggerhead sea turtles remain vulnerable globally, the Mediterranean subpopulation is no longer considered endangered.

We’re continuing to work with other NGOs and the National Marine Park of Zakynthos management authority to ensure Sekania remains a safe haven for loggerheads and other species.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Although the loggerhead population in the Mediterranean is stable, we know our conservation efforts must continue. 

 

Female loggerhead sea turtles always return to lay their eggs on the same beaches from

which they hatched, so safeguarding these beaches is critical to their survival.

 

We’re determined to protect special sites like Sekania – while also tackling the other threats, from climate change to plastic pollution, that these and other sea turtle species face.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Sekania beach on the Greek island of Zakynthos is just 500m long. But as one of the most important sites for the loggerhead sea turtle, it’s been a beacon of hope for conservation action for almost 30 years.

Sekania is perhaps the most important “maternity ward” for loggerhead sea turtles in the whole Mediterranean. This single beach hosts up to 1,000 nests every season, representing one of the highest global nesting densities for this threatened species. 

In an effort to safeguard this unique beach from the impact of mass tourism and coastal development, in 1994 we made the bold decision to purchase the land surrounding it. With the help of thousands of supporters from throughout Europe, we were able to find the funds to secure Sekania. 

Five years later, the broader area was designated as a marine park with Sekania at its heart. And these conservation efforts have paid off: while loggerhead sea turtles remain vulnerable globally, the Mediterranean subpopulation is no longer considered endangered.

We’re continuing to work with other NGOs and the National Marine Park of Zakynthos management authority to ensure Sekania remains a safe haven for loggerheads and other species.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Although the loggerhead population in the Mediterranean is stable, we know our conservation efforts must continue. 

 

Female loggerhead sea turtles always return to lay their eggs on the same beaches from

which they hatched, so safeguarding these beaches is critical to their survival.

 

We’re determined to protect special sites like Sekania – while also tackling the other threats, from climate change to plastic pollution, that these and other sea turtle species face.

 

Together, we can change this

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Help build a world where people and nature thrive

Donate

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We helped create the world’s largest protected wetland complex, Llanos de Moxos in Bolivia.

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Wetlands are complex ecosystems, and the natural environment of Llanos de Moxos remains vulnerable to climate change, pollution and unsustainable development.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Llanos de Moxos, in the northeast of Bolivia, is a mosaic of savannahs and tropical forests, lakes and wetlands. Crossed by three major rivers, the whole area floods during the rainy season.

This vast, ever-changing area is home to an incredible variety of wildlife, including 568 species of birds, 131 mammals, 102 reptiles, 62 amphibians, 625 fishes and at least 1,000 species of plants. They include rare and threatened wildlife like the jaguar, giant otter, pink river dolphin and beniana anaconda.

Archaeological remains bear witness to a sophisticated water-based ancient culture, and Indigenous peoples and local communities still rely on the wetlands for food, water and resources.  

In 2013, after a joint effort by the national and departmental government supported by WWF, Llanos de Moxos was designated as a wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention. At 6.9 million hectares – the size of Belgium and the Netherlands combined – the Llanos de Moxos wetland complex is the largest Ramsar site in the world. Its designation commits Bolivia to protecting the area’s natural characteristics and ensuring it’s managed sustainably, now and in the future.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Wetlands like Llanos de Moxos provide vital benefits to society, including helping to control floods and droughts. But they remain undervalued, with more than a third of the world’s wetlands being lost in the last 40 years.

New roads and other infrastructure, hydropower dams, agriculture, mining and industrial development, carried out without considering the needs of people and nature, all pose a threat to the health of wetland ecosystems like Llanos de Moxos. And climate change is causing further disruption to finely balanced natural processes.

We want to ensure everyone – from governments and the private sector to individuals and communities – recognizes the importance of wetlands, and works together to protect them.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Llanos de Moxos, in the northeast of Bolivia, is a mosaic of savannahs and tropical forests, lakes and wetlands. Crossed by three major rivers, the whole area floods during the rainy season.

This vast, ever-changing area is home to an incredible variety of wildlife, including 568 species of birds, 131 mammals, 102 reptiles, 62 amphibians, 625 fishes and at least 1,000 species of plants. They include rare and threatened wildlife like the jaguar, giant otter, pink river dolphin and beniana anaconda.

Archaeological remains bear witness to a sophisticated water-based ancient culture, and Indigenous peoples and local communities still rely on the wetlands for food, water and resources.  

In 2013, after a joint effort by the national and departmental government supported by WWF, Llanos de Moxos was designated as a wetland of international importance under the Ramsar Convention. At 6.9 million hectares – the size of Belgium and the Netherlands combined – the Llanos de Moxos wetland complex is the largest Ramsar site in the world. Its designation commits Bolivia to protecting the area’s natural characteristics and ensuring it’s managed sustainably, now and in the future.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Wetlands like Llanos de Moxos provide vital benefits to society, including helping to control floods and droughts. But they remain undervalued, with more than a third of the world’s wetlands being lost in the last 40 years.

New roads and other infrastructure, hydropower dams, agriculture, mining and industrial development, carried out without considering the needs of people and nature, all pose a threat to the health of wetland ecosystems like Llanos de Moxos. And climate change is causing further disruption to finely balanced natural processes.

We want to ensure everyone – from governments and the private sector to individuals and communities – recognizes the importance of wetlands, and works together to protect them.

 

Together, we can change this

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Help build a world where people and nature thrive

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We worked with local people to establish community management of 92,000 hectares of vital wilderness in the southern Caucasus.

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we worked with local people to establish community management of 92,000 hectares of vital wilderness in the southern Caucasus.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The Caucasus is a crossroads of landscapes, wildlife, cultures and traditions. Stretching from the Black Sea in the west to the Caspian Sea in the east, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia make up the central part of this region, creating a bridge between continents and a mosaic of rich biodiversity and traditional communities. Here, peoples’ livelihoods are still deeply connected to the land and locals and wildlife live without borders. 

While protected areas are one way to conserve nature, it’s crucial that people and nature can thrive together outside these areas too. Our Eco-Corridors Fund project works with local communities to conserve important species and habitats to improve connections – known as ecological corridors – between protected areas. At the same time, it supports communities to maintain and enhance their culture, economy and well-being.

Since 2015, the project has supported 20 communities to sustainably manage their land, helping to protect 92,000 hectares of vital habitats. This has helped to conserve globally and regionally threatened species like the Caucasian red deer, Caucasian chamois, brown bear, Caucasian leopard, bezoar ibex, Armenian mouflon and Eastern tur.

 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Conserving landscapes large enough to sustain healthy wildlife populations without impeding traditional livelihoods brings multiple benefits for people and nature – from protecting biodiversity and cultural heritage to supporting climate change adaptation and nature-based tourism.

Yet, the habitats and way of life in the region are under ever-growing pressure from outside threats. 

By 2030, we need to combat habitat fragmentation in priority conservation landscapes of the South Caucasus. We also want all three countries to recognize the concept of ecological corridors in their national legislation so people and nature can live in harmony in the Caucasus, as they have for thousands of years.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

The Caucasus is a crossroads of landscapes, wildlife, cultures and traditions. Stretching from the Black Sea in the west to the Caspian Sea in the east, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia make up the central part of this region, creating a bridge between continents and a mosaic of rich biodiversity and traditional communities. Here, peoples’ livelihoods are still deeply connected to the land and locals and wildlife live without borders. 

While protected areas are one way to conserve nature, it’s crucial that people and nature can thrive together outside these areas too. Our Eco-Corridors Fund project works with local communities to conserve important species and habitats to improve connections – known as ecological corridors – between protected areas. At the same time, it supports communities to maintain and enhance their culture, economy and well-being.

Since 2015, the project has supported 20 communities to sustainably manage their land, helping to protect 92,000 hectares of vital habitats. This has helped to conserve globally and regionally threatened species like the Caucasian red deer, Caucasian chamois, brown bear, Caucasian leopard, bezoar ibex, Armenian mouflon and Eastern tur.

 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Conserving landscapes large enough to sustain healthy wildlife populations without impeding traditional livelihoods brings multiple benefits for people and nature – from protecting biodiversity and cultural heritage to supporting climate change adaptation and nature-based tourism.

Yet, the habitats and way of life in the region are under ever-growing pressure from outside threats. 

By 2030, we need to combat habitat fragmentation in priority conservation landscapes of the South Caucasus. We also want all three countries to recognize the concept of ecological corridors in their national legislation so people and nature can live in harmony in the Caucasus, as they have for thousands of years.

 

Together, we can change this

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Help build a world where people and nature thrive

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We’ve helped around 15,000 local people to gain full legal ownership over community protected areas from the Cambodian government, enabling them to sustainably manage their natural resources.

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Snaring is still a major threat to wildlife in Cambodia, causing a rapid decline in many species.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Indigenous peoples and local communities in the Eastern Plains of Cambodia have lived in harmony with nature for generations, helping to conserve the natural environment while benefiting from the resources it provides.

In Mondulkiri province, we’ve helped communities to reach an agreement with the government that grants them legal ownership over 16 community protected areas within the wildlife sanctuaries of Phnom Prich and Srepok. The agreement covers more than 53,000 hectares of forest and involves almost 15,000 people.

Under the agreement, communities take responsibility for managing their land and natural resources in a sustainable way – and we’re supporting them to do so. Initiatives include harvesting and trading non-timber forest products like bamboo, resin and wild mushrooms, developing nature-based tourism and learning environmentally friendly agricultural techniques. 

Community members are also helping to defend their land from threats like poaching and illegal logging by patrolling community protected areas and removing snares. Along with rangers from the Ministry of Environment, community members confiscated 4,772 snares and 302 chainsaws in 2020, leading to 42 prosecutions. The team also rescued more than 100 live wild animals caught in snares or captured by poachers.

In parallel, a WWF-supported environmental education programme, backed by community-based environmental and livelihoods projects, has begun to positively transform people's attitude toward environmental protection and biodiversity conservation.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Habitat loss, poaching and the snaring crisis, fuelled by the illegal wildlife trade, are pushing Cambodia’s wildlife and natural systems to the limit.
 

Snaring is a major threat to wildlife, leading to the rapid decline of many species. Our recent report Silence of the Snares laid bare the scale of the crisis: more than 230,000 snares were removed from five protected areas in Cambodia from 2010-2019. As well as working with local people to tackle snares on the ground, we’re leading a national campaign against snares – our goal is to halt their use in protected areas across the country.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Indigenous peoples and local communities in the Eastern Plains of Cambodia have lived in harmony with nature for generations, helping to conserve the natural environment while benefiting from the resources it provides.

In Mondulkiri province, we’ve helped communities to reach an agreement with the government that grants them legal ownership over 16 community protected areas within the wildlife sanctuaries of Phnom Prich and Srepok. The agreement covers more than 53,000 hectares of forest and involves almost 15,000 people.

Under the agreement, communities take responsibility for managing their land and natural resources in a sustainable way – and we’re supporting them to do so. Initiatives include harvesting and trading non-timber forest products like bamboo, resin and wild mushrooms, developing nature-based tourism and learning environmentally friendly agricultural techniques. 

Community members are also helping to defend their land from threats like poaching and illegal logging by patrolling community protected areas and removing snares. Along with rangers from the Ministry of Environment, community members confiscated 4,772 snares and 302 chainsaws in 2020, leading to 42 prosecutions. The team also rescued more than 100 live wild animals caught in snares or captured by poachers.

In parallel, a WWF-supported environmental education programme, backed by community-based environmental and livelihoods projects, has begun to positively transform people's attitude toward environmental protection and biodiversity conservation.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Habitat loss, poaching and the snaring crisis, fuelled by the illegal wildlife trade, are pushing Cambodia’s wildlife and natural systems to the limit.
 

Snaring is a major threat to wildlife, leading to the rapid decline of many species. Our recent report Silence of the Snares laid bare the scale of the crisis: more than 230,000 snares were removed from five protected areas in Cambodia from 2010-2019. As well as working with local people to tackle snares on the ground, we’re leading a national campaign against snares – our goal is to halt their use in protected areas across the country.

 

Together, we can change this

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Help build a world where people and nature thrive

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And with the support of local communities and other partners, we doubled the population of jaguars in Argentina’s Atlantic Forest.

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The big cat’s population in Argentina is still very low because of poaching, habitat loss and other threats.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

At the beginning of the century, the largest predator in South America had almost disappeared from the continent’s second largest country.

In 2004-2005, only an estimated 42 jaguars remained in Argentina’s Misiones province and in the neighbouring Iguaçu National Park in Brazil. With the continuing loss and fragmentation of its forest habitat, coupled with hunting, falling prey species availability and road accidents, the big cat’s future looked bleak.

So, we joined up with local organizations and the government to develop conservation action plans. Jaguars need to be able to move around through large areas of forest, so we’ve focused on protecting key habitats and reconnecting fragmented areas – strengthening the “green corridor” of the Atlantic Forest in Misiones that connects with Brazil and Paraguay.

The results have been impressive: the latest census in 2018-2019 put the number of jaguars in the area at 105, more than doubling the population.  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Although numbers have grown over the last 15 years, the jaguar population in Argentina remains critically low, and the threats haven’t gone away. Our goal is to reach a population of 250 jaguars in the landscape and lift the threat of extinction.

While it’s an ambitious challenge, the payoff would be huge. As top predators, the jaguars’ presence is an indicator of the health of the forest ecosystem. By successfully conserving jaguars, we’ll also be securing the long-term future of the hugely biodiverse Atlantic Forest and all the wildlife and people who depend upon it. 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

At the beginning of the century, the largest predator in South America had almost disappeared from the continent’s second largest country.

In 2004-2005, only an estimated 42 jaguars remained in Argentina’s Misiones province and in the neighbouring Iguaçu National Park in Brazil. With the continuing loss and fragmentation of its forest habitat, coupled with hunting, falling prey species availability and road accidents, the big cat’s future looked bleak.

So, we joined up with local organizations and the government to develop conservation action plans. Jaguars need to be able to move around through large areas of forest, so we’ve focused on protecting key habitats and reconnecting fragmented areas – strengthening the “green corridor” of the Atlantic Forest in Misiones that connects with Brazil and Paraguay.

The results have been impressive: the latest census in 2018-2019 put the number of jaguars in the area at 105, more than doubling the population.  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Although numbers have grown over the last 15 years, the jaguar population in Argentina remains critically low, and the threats haven’t gone away. Our goal is to reach a population of 250 jaguars in the landscape and lift the threat of extinction.

While it’s an ambitious challenge, the payoff would be huge. As top predators, the jaguars’ presence is an indicator of the health of the forest ecosystem. By successfully conserving jaguars, we’ll also be securing the long-term future of the hugely biodiverse Atlantic Forest and all the wildlife and people who depend upon it. 

Together, we can change this

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WITH YOUR SUPPORT

We helped get nature-based solutions to the climate crisis like forest restoration into Chile’s official climate change action plan.

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Public and private funding are still needed to make these solutions a reality.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

A healthy environment is one of the best weapons we have in the fight against climate change. In addition to ending the burning of fossil fuels, we need to protect and restore natural systems on land and at sea that can both absorb greenhouse gas emissions and help people and nature adapt to a changing climate.

So it’s great news that the Chilean government has decided to make these nature-based solutions to the climate crisis a big part of its new official climate change action plan – the country’s contribution to the UN climate commitment agreed on by 191 countries around the world. 

The government’s new plan includes many aspects recommended by WWF. It aims to restore one million hectares of landscapes by 2030, which will help lock up carbon as well as benefiting wildlife and local people. Along Chile’s extensive coastline, it commits to increasing the marine area under protection and effectively managing all the country’s marine protected areas – enabling them to store more carbon and be more resilient.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

While these nature-based solutions have huge potential, funding is still needed to make them a reality. And they couldn’t be more urgent: Chile has been identified as one of the top 10 countries most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.

We’re pushing for the government to establish an Environmental Fund to help put its commitments into practice at the scale and pace required.


Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

A healthy environment is one of the best weapons we have in the fight against climate change. In addition to ending the burning of fossil fuels, we need to protect and restore natural systems on land and at sea that can both absorb greenhouse gas emissions and help people and nature adapt to a changing climate.

So it’s great news that the Chilean government has decided to make these nature-based solutions to the climate crisis a big part of its new official climate change action plan – the country’s contribution to the UN climate commitment agreed on by 191 countries around the world. 

The government’s new plan includes many aspects recommended by WWF. It aims to restore one million hectares of landscapes by 2030, which will help lock up carbon as well as benefiting wildlife and local people. Along Chile’s extensive coastline, it commits to increasing the marine area under protection and effectively managing all the country’s marine protected areas – enabling them to store more carbon and be more resilient.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

While these nature-based solutions have huge potential, funding is still needed to make them a reality. And they couldn’t be more urgent: Chile has been identified as one of the top 10 countries most vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.

We’re pushing for the government to establish an Environmental Fund to help put its commitments into practice at the scale and pace required.


Together, we can change this

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Help build a world where people and nature thrive

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WITH YOUR SUPPORT

We helped 220,000 green turtle hatchlings reach the sea from 6,000 nests in the last 15 years from Akyatan beach in Turkey.

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All seven marine turtle species are under threat from pollution, habitat loss, fishing bycatch and climate change.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Marine turtles have inhabited the Mediterranean for millions of years, and hold an important place in the culture of the coastal communities who share their habitat.

More than half of the Mediterranean’s green turtle population nests on the beaches of eastern Turkey. And thanks to strong collaboration with local government, supporters and volunteers, we’ve helped ensure female turtles are able to lay their eggs safely along this part of the Mediterranean coast. 

In total, 22 nesting beaches are now under protection. They include Akyatan beach, where around 6,000 turtles nest. In the last 15 years, we’ve helped 220,000 turtle hatchlings on the beach to safely reach the sea.

We’ve also fitted 15 marine turtles with satellite tags to help monitor their migration routes so we can better protect them in future.

Our conservation efforts have raised public and media awareness of endangered marine turtles in Turkey, boosting our efforts to protect important habitats and benefiting local people by attracting nature-based tourism.

 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Only one or two turtle hatchlings out of every thousand survive to adulthood. But on top of the dangers of natural predators, human activities threaten their chances of survival. 

Sea turtles always return to the same beaches to nest, so coastal development, tourism, litter and even bright lights can upset their breeding patterns – as can rising sea levels and warmer temperatures brought on by climate change.

Turtles also get caught accidentally in fishing gear, and are badly affected by plastic pollution, mistaking plastic litter for food.

From local to global level, we’re working to address all these threats and secure the future of the Mediterranean’s ancient mariners.

 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

 

Marine turtles have inhabited the Mediterranean for millions of years, and hold an important place in the culture of the coastal communities who share their habitat.

More than half of the Mediterranean’s green turtle population nests on the beaches of eastern Turkey. And thanks to strong collaboration with local government, supporters and volunteers, we’ve helped ensure female turtles are able to lay their eggs safely along this part of the Mediterranean coast. 

In total, 22 nesting beaches are now under protection. They include Akyatan beach, where around 6,000 turtles nest. In the last 15 years, we’ve helped 220,000 turtle hatchlings on the beach to safely reach the sea.

We’ve also fitted 15 marine turtles with satellite tags to help monitor their migration routes so we can better protect them in future.

Our conservation efforts have raised public and media awareness of endangered marine turtles in Turkey, boosting our efforts to protect important habitats and benefiting local people by attracting nature-based tourism.

 

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

 

Only one or two turtle hatchlings out of every thousand survive to adulthood. But on top of the dangers of natural predators, human activities threaten their chances of survival. 

Sea turtles always return to the same beaches to nest, so coastal development, tourism, litter and even bright lights can upset their breeding patterns – as can rising sea levels and warmer temperatures brought on by climate change.

Turtles also get caught accidentally in fishing gear, and are badly affected by plastic pollution, mistaking plastic litter for food.

From local to global level, we’re working to address all these threats and secure the future of the Mediterranean’s ancient mariners.

 

Together, we can change this

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WITH YOUR SUPPORT

And working alongside communities, governments and partners in Europe, we are close to creating the world’s first five-country protected river landscape.

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New hydropower developments, artificial channels and sediment extraction still threaten this proposed UNESCO reserve for the rivers Danube, Drava and Mura.

TOGETHER, WE CAN CHANGE THIS.

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

It’s known as the “Amazon of Europe” – a 700km green belt connecting almost a million hectares of priceless landscapes. And, thanks to your help and the support of many partners, this spectacular landscape is set to become the world’s first five-country UNESCO Biosphere Reserve – a symbol of unity and recognition of its ecological and cultural importance.

Spanning Austria, Croatia, Hungary, Serbia and Slovenia, the proposed Mura-Drava-Danube Biosphere Reserve covers the lower courses of the Drava and Mura rivers and related sections of the Danube. Connecting 13 protected areas, this stunning river landscape includes large floodplain forests, gravel and sand banks, oxbow lakes – and amazingly rich wildlife. 

Every year, more than 250,000 migratory waterfowls use the rivers to rest and to feed. The area is also home to the highest breeding density in continental Europe of many endangered species, including little terns, black storks and the nearly extinct sterlet, as well as beavers and otters.

The landscape is also home to almost a million people, and is vital for their livelihoods and well-being. Large floodplains lower the risks from floods, and the natural landscape provides and purifies the water that people and agriculture depend on.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

The Amazon of Europe remains under threat from damaging development. Extraction of sand and gravel from the riverbed, artificial changes to river channels and new hydropower all cause devastating environmental impacts. 

As well as harming nature, these activities will cause long-term economic damage as groundwater levels drop, meaning riverside forests dry out and agricultural lands become less productive.

We’re working with partners to find better solutions that will protect and restore rivers, wetlands and other natural landscapes in the Mura-Drava-Danube, while contributing to the prosperity and well-being of local people. 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

It’s known as the “Amazon of Europe” – a 700km green belt connecting almost a million hectares of priceless landscapes. And, thanks to your help and the support of many partners, this spectacular landscape is set to become the world’s first five-country UNESCO Biosphere Reserve – a symbol of unity and recognition of its ecological and cultural importance.

Spanning Austria, Croatia, Hungary, Serbia and Slovenia, the proposed Mura-Drava-Danube Biosphere Reserve covers the lower courses of the Drava and Mura rivers and related sections of the Danube. Connecting 13 protected areas, this stunning river landscape includes large floodplain forests, gravel and sand banks, oxbow lakes – and amazingly rich wildlife. 

Every year, more than 250,000 migratory waterfowls use the rivers to rest and to feed. The area is also home to the highest breeding density in continental Europe of many endangered species, including little terns, black storks and the nearly extinct sterlet, as well as beavers and otters.

The landscape is also home to almost a million people, and is vital for their livelihoods and well-being. Large floodplains lower the risks from floods, and the natural landscape provides and purifies the water that people and agriculture depend on.

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

The Amazon of Europe remains under threat from damaging development. Extraction of sand and gravel from the riverbed, artificial changes to river channels and new hydropower all cause devastating environmental impacts. 

As well as harming nature, these activities will cause long-term economic damage as groundwater levels drop, meaning riverside forests dry out and agricultural lands become less productive.

We’re working with partners to find better solutions that will protect and restore rivers, wetlands and other natural landscapes in the Mura-Drava-Danube, while contributing to the prosperity and well-being of local people. 

Together, we can change this

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Help build a world where people and nature thrive

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we’ve provided solar electricity to hundreds of households as well as schools, clinics and businesses in Uganda, in partnership with the government – helping to benefit people, nature and the climate.

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A majority of Uganda’s population still depend on other fuels for lighting, leading to health problems, CO2 emissions and conflicts over natural resources.

TOGETHER WE CAN CHANGE THIS

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

Renewable energy isn’t only vital to combating climate change – it can also be a life-changer for communities who’ve never had access to reliable electricity.

In Uganda, we’ve worked with the government to bring solar power to hundreds of households and businesses in remote rural districts around Queen Elizabeth National Park – a vital area for conservation of lions, elephants and many other species. Solar power means local people no longer need to harvest firewood, preventing damage to the environment and incidents of human-wildlife conflict. 

As well as reducing energy costs and improving people’s quality of life, solar power is transforming health and education services.

The Hamukungu Health Centre, which serves over 50,000 people, is now able to offer a 24-hour service for the first time. It now has cold storage for vaccines, which has helped reduce infant mortality, and can carry out blood tests, which are vital for HIV treatment.

Young people at Kitabu Primary School are now getting to use equipment like computers and printers, can keep studying even after daylight fails, and even board at the school – all of which is giving them better educational opportunities

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

Many communities across Uganda – and other parts of Africa – still lack access to reliable electricity. For 62% of Uganda’s population, lighting is provided by burning kerosene, which is not only expensive, but also causes health problems and carbon emissions.

Meanwhile, a growing population’s demand for charcoal is putting ever increasing pressure on Uganda’s forests. Conflict with wildlife is also a growing problem for communities living alongside protected areas.

We know that conservation and community development go hand in hand. We’re working to scale up renewable energy solutions across Uganda, and elsewhere – benefiting people, nature and the climate. 

Together, we can change this

THE PROGRESS WE'VE MADE TOGETHER… 

Renewable energy isn’t only vital to combating climate change – it can also be a life-changer for communities who’ve never had access to reliable electricity.

In Uganda, we’ve worked with the government to bring solar power to hundreds of households and businesses in remote rural districts around Queen Elizabeth National Park – a vital area for conservation of lions, elephants and many other species. Solar power means local people no longer need to harvest firewood, preventing damage to the environment and incidents of human-wildlife conflict. 

As well as reducing energy costs and improving people’s quality of life, solar power is transforming health and education services.

The Hamukungu Health Centre, which serves over 50,000 people, is now able to offer a 24-hour service for the first time. It now has cold storage for vaccines, which has helped reduce infant mortality, and can carry out blood tests, which are vital for HIV treatment.

Young people at Kitabu Primary School are now getting to use equipment like computers and printers, can keep studying even after daylight fails, and even board at the school – all of which is giving them better educational opportunities

  

THE CHALLENGE WE STILL FACE… 

Many communities across Uganda – and other parts of Africa – still lack access to reliable electricity. For 62% of Uganda’s population, lighting is provided by burning kerosene, which is not only expensive, but also causes health problems and carbon emissions.

Meanwhile, a growing population’s demand for charcoal is putting ever increasing pressure on Uganda’s forests. Conflict with wildlife is also a growing problem for communities living alongside protected areas.

We know that conservation and community development go hand in hand. We’re working to scale up renewable energy solutions across Uganda, and elsewhere – benefiting people, nature and the climate. 

Together, we can change this

Support our work

Help build a world where people and nature thrive

Donate

Be part of our journey

Subscribe now

Support our work

Help build a world where people and nature thrive

Donate

Be part of our journey

Stay updated and subscribe to our newsletter

Subscribe now
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Celebrating 60 years together

Our commemorative publication offers a massive thank you to everyone who has been part of the WWF journey over the past 60 years! Read on to see how much we have achieved together with colleagues, partners and supporters – and insights on the many challenges still to be overcome.

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© Tessel in 't Veld / WWF-Netherlands

WWF 60th Quiz

How much do you know about WWF's 60 years of action for people and nature?
Take our quiz to find out!

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The New Podcast from WWF

Forces of Nature Podcast

What would you ask the world's best known environmentalists if you had the chance? Legendary conservationists and young activists get candid in our Forces of Nature podcast series. 

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