Four rhinos successfully collared in Nepal’s critical corridor | WWF
Four rhinos successfully collared in Nepal’s critical corridor

Posted on 23 January 2016

Bardia, Nepal – A total of four one-horned rhinos have been successfully collared in Khata Corridor within a span of fourteen months.
A total of four one-horned rhinos have been successfully collared in Khata Corridor within a span of fourteen months. Three female rhinos and one male rhino were fitted with a satellite-GPS collar and released back in the transboundary corridor that links Nepal’s Bardia National Park with India’s Katerniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary.
 
The first rhino, a sub-adult female, was collared in November 2014, followed by a second adult female rhino in March 2015. The remaining two, an adult male and female, were collared on 22 and 23 January 2016 consecutively in Khata corridor.
 
“The rhino survey of 2015 identified eight rhinos in Khata Corridor. By collaring 50% of this population we hope to get robust information to guide conservation science and strengthen transboundary efforts to protect rhinos,” stated Ramesh Thapa, Chief Warden of Bardia National Park. “The information will also  provide evidence of corridor use by endangered wildlife to advocate for strategic and sustainable approaches to any infrastructure development planned inside Khata Corridor.”
 
“Data retrieved from the satellite collar will provide key insights to habitat use and movement patterns of rhinos in the corridor,” stated Dr. Shanta Raj Jnawali, Biodiversity Coordinator-Hariyo Ban Program, WWF Nepal who was part of the collaring team. “The information generated from the radio collar will help to optimize the land-use pattern, land-cover configuration and habitat management within the corridor for wildlife and human use, and assess the thresholds of habitat restoration necessary to maintain a functional corridor.”
 
Data from the collared rhinos will also enable community based anti-poaching units to focus patrolling efforts and keep a closer vigil on poaching and wildlife crimes in the corridor areas.
 
The collaring expedition was led by the Government of Nepal’s Ministry of Forests and Soil Conservation and its line departments with the support of WWF Nepal, National Trust for Nature Conservation, and local communities.
The collared rhino is a sub adult male about eight years of age.
© WWF Nepal
Data from the satellite GPS collar will aid conservation science and strengthen transboundary cooperation to protect rhinos.
© WWF Nepal
The collaring expedition was led by the Government of Nepal’s Ministry of Forests and Soil Conservation and its line departments with the support of WWF Nepal, National Trust for Nature Conservation, and local communities.
© WWF Nepal