Wildlife Trade | WWF
© WWF / James Morgan

Wildlife trade

Illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade are major threats to many of the world's species. Through its global network and especially the work of TRAFFIC, WWF helps to combat the illegal trade and encourage sustainability in the legal trade.
 
  • Wildlife Crime Initiative: A long-term, collaborative initiative between WWF and TRAFFIC to help tackle the global poaching crisis and unprecedented surge in organised wildlife crime, which threatens the survival of iconic species and undermines national security, the rule of law and sustainable development.
     
  • Changing consumer behaviour: Persuading consumers to make informed choices when buying wildlife-based products.
     
  • Encouraging people to use their local wildlife sustainably: Working hand-in-hand with communities to provide practical help to develop sustainable livelihoods and conserve natural resources.
     
  • Working with the private sector: Promoting sustainable wildlife trade.
     
  • Backing the enforcement of appropriate wildlife trade laws: Supporting the enforcement of CITES, which regulates the international trade in wildlife; providing tools, training and funding; encouraging cross-border cooperation; funding critical research; and raising public awareness about illegal and unsustainable trade issues.
     
  • Promoting new laws for the control of wildlife trade, when appropriate: WWF has contributed to achieving protection under CITES for several marine and timber species, such as the humphead wrasse, great white shark, and the Asian commercial timber species, ramin.
     
  • Working at the 'top level': Advocating to ensure that the mandate of multilateral environment agreements, such as CITES, are not weakened or over-ruled by institutions, such as the World Trade Organization, which pursue economic priorities with little consideration for their long-term, environmental impacts.
     
WWF also publishes the Living Planet Report, which showcases the impact of humans on the world's natural resources. The report reminds governments that they must act now to reduce the degradation of the planet, including species loss as a result of wildlife trade.
 
    © Chris R. Shepherd - TRAFFIC Southeast Asia
A Sumatran orang-utan, confiscated in Aceh, stares through the bars of its cage
© Chris R. Shepherd - TRAFFIC Southeast Asia
Subscribe to WWF


Facebook Twitter Google Plus YouTube Flickr Vimeo

© naturepl.com / Andy Rouse / WWF

Latest News & Publications
08 May 2019

Japan remains one of the world’s largest domestic ivory markets, and is home to an active, though ...

13 Feb 2019

Cape Town (13 February 2018). South Africa’s Department of Environmental Affairs has announced ...

12 Oct 2018

Global leaders have acknowledged the need to take urgent collective action to combat the illegal ...

05 Oct 2018

The 70th meeting of the Standing Committee of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered ...

01 Oct 2018

Today’s decision allowing countries complicit in the illegal ivory trade to withdraw from the ...

01 Oct 2018

Governments, International Organisations and Civil Society meet in Russia to make key decisions on ...

27 Sep 2018

Three newly released reports paint a complex picture of China’s ivory market post ban; with sales ...

13 Sep 2018

Yahoo Japan is the single biggest online platform for elephant ivory sales in Japan, according to a ...

Load More

Emirates Open Skies - Wildlife Crime article
 
    © Emirates
Emirates Open Skies magazine feature on wildlife crime
© Emirates

Stay updated - subscribe to our newsletter


TRAFFIC is a joint programme of WWF and the World Conservation Union (IUCN) that monitors the global wildlife trade. TRAFFIC also works in close co-operation with CITES.

Infographic

 The WWF Wildlife Crime Scorecard report selects 23 range, transit and consumer countries from Asia and Africa facing the highest levels of illegal trade in elephant ivory, rhino horn and tiger parts.