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"We're all part of the complex web of life on earth - the Living Planet Report helps us understand where we fit in - and how we can help."

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Eco Footprint [view sample]
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Water Footprint [view sample]
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Living Planet Index [view sample]
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Coral Reefs: good for marine life, good for us



Coral reefs are home to a quarter of the world's marine life. But reefs aren't just good for fish. 450 million people need them for food, jobs and protection of the sea. But climate change, pollution and over-fishing are trashing reefs everywhere. A quarter of the world's coral reefs are damaged beyond repair. WWF is working to save these extraordinary underwater worlds.

Healthy diet for a healthy planet



What we eat has a huge impact on the world around us. For instance nearly one fifth of all greenhouse gas emissions come from agriculture. As the world becomes richer we consume more calories and protein and this means more land required to raise livestock and more seafood that is being pulled from the oceans. The food we eat is part of a complex web of life to which we all belong.

Palm oil: how our consumer choices affect wildlife



Your shampoo, your ice cream, your margarine, your lipstick - all contain palm oil. Demand is still growing, as are oil palm plantations... but at what price to tropical forests and the biodiversity found there?

Living in harmony with nature



Human well-being is directly connected to the way we treat our planet's natural resources. Deforestation, pollution, extinction, loss of biodiversity directly impact quality of living. Destroying nature makes life harder for all of us and even more for those who are already vulnerable.

The importance of water



Human well-being is directly connected to the way we treat our planet's natural resources. Deforestation, pollution, extinction, loss of biodiversity directly impact quality of living. Destroying nature makes life harder for all of us and even more for those who are already vulnerable.

The importance of Mangroves - and our impacts upon them



Mangroves are one of nature's most amazing factories. Providing food, shelter, jobs and protection. Yet we are replacing them with fish farms, reclaimed land or killing them with pollutants. We have lost more than half of them already. But they can bounce back. And we can help them. If we all understand the limits of living on a single, finite planet.
Mbiwo Constantine Kusebahasa, in Kasese, Rwenzori Mountains, Uganda at the Forest Landscape Restoration programme in Rukoki Sub-County. Coffee plants are showing very low volumes of fruit, an example of climate change.
© Mbiwo Constantine Kusebahasa, in Kasese, Rwenzori Mountains, Uganda at the Forest Landscape Restoration programme in Rukoki Sub-County. Coffee plants are showing very low volumes of fruit, an example of climate change.  © Simon Rawles / WWF

General Living Planet Report pictures available for download here

Clear cut of mangrove forests for fish pond. (generally practiced in the 1970s) Sibuyan Island Philippines
© Mangroves are one of nature's most amazing factories. Providing food, shelter, jobs and protection. Yet we are replacing them with fish farms, reclaimed land or killing them with pollutants. We have lost more than half of them already. But they can bounce back. And we can help them. If we all understand the limits of living on a single, finite planet. © Jürgen Freund / WWF

Mangrove pictures are available for download here

The weekly trip to the supermarket - just another thing on the to-do list. But our consumer choices directly affect communities, wildlife and the climate. It's all about palm oil - the versatile vegetable oil which makes crisps crispy and soap soapy. In fact, palm oil is in about half the items you’ll find in most supermarkets. Indonesia and Malaysia are big palm oil producers. They’re also home to endangered species. When forests are destroyed to create palm oil plantations, the people and wildlife that depend on those forests are hit hard. Trashing forests for palm oil also releases carbon into the atmosphere, speeding up global warming. However, some palm oil producers are showing they can be both sustainable and profitable. To be certified “sustainable,” palm oil growers must meet social and environmental standards. As consumers, we should insist our favourite brands and stores use sustainable palm oil in their products.
© The weekly trip to the supermarket - just another thing on the to-do list. But our consumer choices directly affect communities, wildlife and the climate. It's all about palm oil - the versatile vegetable oil which makes crisps crispy and soap soapy. In fact, palm oil is in about half the items you’ll find in most supermarkets. Indonesia and Malaysia are big palm oil producers. They’re also home to endangered species. When forests are destroyed to create palm oil plantations, the people and wildlife that depend on those forests are hit hard. Trashing forests for palm oil also releases carbon into the atmosphere, speeding up global warming. However, some palm oil producers are showing they can be both sustainable and profitable. To be certified “sustainable,” palm oil growers must meet social and environmental standards. As consumers, we should insist our favourite brands and stores use sustainable palm oil in their products.  © Jürgen Freund / WWF

Palm oil pictures are available for download here

 Of all the water on this blue planet of ours, only 3% of it is freshwater. And this precious, life-giving resource has seen a decline of 35% in the species that live within its realm since 1970. We must use water more wisely. We must make better use of the bounties and services that it provides.
© Of all the water on this blue planet of ours, only 3% of it is freshwater. And this precious, life-giving resource has seen a decline of 35% in the species that live within its realm since 1970. We must use water more wisely. We must make better use of the bounties and services that it provides. © Brent Stirton / Getty Images / WWF

Freshwater pictures are available here

Coral reefs are home to a quarter of the world's marine life. The Great Barrier Reef is the largest living thing on Earth, and the only living thing visible from space. Reefs aren’t just good for fish – 450 million people need them for food, jobs and protection from the sea. Good for health – medicines derived from corals fight diseases like HIV and cancer. Good for business – the Coral Triangle supports the livelihoods of more than 100 million people. Good for holidays – the Great Barrier Reef generates $4.5 billion in tourism annually. But climate change, pollution and over-fishing are trashing reefs everywhere. A quarter of the world's coral reefs are damaged beyond repair. WWF is working to save these extraordinary underwater worlds.
© Coral reefs are home to a quarter of the world's marine life. The Great Barrier Reef is the largest living thing on Earth, and the only living thing visible from space. Reefs aren’t just good for fish – 450 million people need them for food, jobs and protection from the sea. Good for health – medicines derived from corals fight diseases like HIV and cancer. Good for business – the Coral Triangle supports the livelihoods of more than 100 million people. Good for holidays – the Great Barrier Reef generates $4.5 billion in tourism annually. But climate change, pollution and over-fishing are trashing reefs everywhere. A quarter of the world's coral reefs are damaged beyond repair. WWF is working to save these extraordinary underwater worlds.  © Cat Holloway / WWF

Coral reef pictures are available here

Colours and shapes show the great diversity of local products. La Cocha, Colombia Northern Andes Ecoregion.
© Colours and shapes show the great diversity of local products. La Cocha, Colombia Northern Andes Ecoregion.  © Diego M. Garces / WWF

Diet pictures are available for download here 

Children playing outside the Epulu Primary School. Democratic Republic of Congo.
© Children playing outside the Epulu Primary School. Democratic Republic of Congo. © Sandra Mbanefo Obiago / WWF

Well being pictures are available for download here 

James Leape, Director General of WWF International
© James Leape, Director General of WWF International © Ezequiel Scagnetti / WWF

 James Leape pictures available for download here

Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) shoal, captive, Malta, Mediteranean, May 2009
© Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) shoal, captive, Malta, Mediteranean, May 2009 © Wild Wonders of Europe / Zankl / WWF

Species highlighted in the report are available here