A decade of Earth Hour: From a symbolic moment to a global movement | WWF
A decade of Earth Hour: From a symbolic moment to a global movement

Posted on 23 March 2017

Ten years after the world's first Earth Hour in Sydney put climate change in the spotlight, WWF's landmark movement is set to once again unite millions of people around the globe to shine a light on climate action.

Ten years after the world's first Earth Hour in Sydney put climate change in the spotlight, WWF's landmark movement is set to once again unite millions of people around the globe to shine a light on climate action. As the planet continues to witness climate records being broken and the need for greater ambition and commitment accelerates, the world's largest grassroots movement for the environment is mobilising individuals, communities and organisations globally to do their part to help change climate change.

Earth Hour 2010. The Sydney skyline after the lights were switched off, Sydney, Australia.


Photo: Earth Hour 2010. The Sydney skyline after the lights were switched off, Sydney, Australia. © WWF / Sewell

On Saturday 31 March 2007, Sydney, one of Australia’s busiest cities, stunned the world by switching off its lights for the world’s first Earth Hour. Around 2.2 million individuals, businesses and organizations turned off their lights for one hour to show the government that climate change was an issue they cared about.

Earth Hour celebrated on the ISS


Photo: Italian astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti holds up a sign for Earth Hour 2015 aboard the International Space Station, March 28, 2015 © Earth Hour


With each passing year, WWF’s Earth Hour spread to new countries and territories (including the International Space Station) as individuals and communities worldwide joined the movement to show that climate change affects us all- and we all have a role to play.

In 2015, Earth Hour supporters helped provide solar power to off-the-grid families in the remote island-community of Beton in the Philippines.

Photo: In 2015, Earth Hour supporters helped provide solar power to off-the-grid families in the remote island-community of Beton in the Philippines. © Gregg Yan / WWF
 

Across the seven continents, WWF’s Earth Hour has inspired millions to support and participate in critical climate and conservation projects led by WWF, powering efforts to drive climate policy, awareness and action among individuals, businesses and governments. The movement known world over for lights out has even helped bring solar energy to off-the-grid communities in India and the Philippines!

In 2016, the movement powered over 2.4 million individual actions for the planet, including on-the-ground activities, digital actions and climate petitions. In South East Asia, US $21,346 was raised to contribute to the combat of wildlife crime. In Vietnam, Hue became the first city in the country recognized by WWF for its commitment to low-carbon development as part of the highly selective global Earth Hour City Challenge. Regarded as Vietnam’s National Earth Hour Capital 2016, Hue is celebrated for the environmentally friendly policies and initiatives that the city and its residents are taking to become leaders in sustainable development.

Lights off event

On Saturday 25 March 2017 at 8:30 p.m. local time, millions across the globe will unite once again to shine a light on climate action. As skylines go dark, people will also be invited to take a stand for climate action on their timelines through the Donate Your Feed platform. Supporters can share their commitment to the planet by donating five Facebook posts on their timeline to Earth Hour on www.earthhour.org/climateaction 10 March onwards.
 

Earth Hour
© WWF-Indonesia (Jimmy Bond)