Bold move to protect Sumatran forest | WWF

Bold move to protect Sumatran forest

Posted on 11 November 2015    
Kobu tribesman watching burning jungle. An area used by generations for hunting and medicinal plants Bukit Tigah Puluh National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia
Kobu tribesman watching burning jungle. An area used by generations for hunting and medicinal plants Bukit Tigah Puluh National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia
© Mark Edwards / WWF
An innovative forest protection and restoration scheme has been agreed for important lowland tropical forest on the Indonesian island of Sumatra which has the highest rate of deforestation in the world. An area of 40,000 ha has been rezoned for restoration  rather than clearing – effectively expanding the neighbouring Bukit Tigapuluh National Park by 25 per cent. The partnership of several organisations, including WWF, and local communities, has been granted a 60-year license to manage the area, home to an estimated 30 Sumatran tigers, as well as endangered Sumatran elephant and orangutan. This ecosystem restoration concession will explore revenue-generating activities to finance the forest restoration and
management.
Kobu tribesman watching burning jungle. An area used by generations for hunting and medicinal plants Bukit Tigah Puluh National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia
Kobu tribesman watching burning jungle. An area used by generations for hunting and medicinal plants Bukit Tigah Puluh National Park, Sumatra, Indonesia
© Mark Edwards / WWF Enlarge

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