Australia denies Great Barrier Reef’s dire decline | WWF

Australia denies Great Barrier Reef’s dire decline

Posted on 02 February 2015    
In the Great Barrier Reef, larger fish inside no-take areas produce disproportionately more eggs and larvae than in areas that are fished. Besides their contribution to sustaining fisheries, no-take areas can also improve habitat quality, protect ecosystem structure and function, and maintain ecosystem goods and services.
© Jürgen Freund / WWF
An Australian Government report to UNESCO in January which portrays the Great Barrier Reef as being in good condition fails to acknowledge the serious decline of the health of the reef -- despite evidence from the scientific community. The report is part of efforts by the government to persuade UNESCO not to list the reef as a World Heritage Site in danger. Independent studies show decreases in marine species and a 50% decline in coral cover, and the GBR Marine Park Authority describes the outlook for the Reef as "poor, has worsened since 2009, and expected to further deteriorate in the furture". WWF highlights the report’s inaccuracies and its failure to provide a convincing plan for the restoration of the outstanding universal values of the reef.

Original article posted on: 02.02.15           Updated: 19.03.15
 
In the Great Barrier Reef, larger fish inside no-take areas produce disproportionately more eggs and larvae than in areas that are fished. Besides their contribution to sustaining fisheries, no-take areas can also improve habitat quality, protect ecosystem structure and function, and maintain ecosystem goods and services.
© Jürgen Freund / WWF Enlarge

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