Recovery of threatened wildlife | WWF

Recovery of threatened wildlife

Posted on 24 February 2015    
Nezhinskii is a male amur leopard (<i>Panthera pardus orientalis</i>). He was the first leopard that we photographed back in 2002 when we started experimenting with camera traps in this area.
Nezhinskii is a male amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis). He was the first leopard that we photographed back in 2002 when we started experimenting with camera traps in this area.
© WWF-Russia / ISUNR
The number of Amur leopards, considered the world’s rarest wild cat, has more than doubled over the past seven years. From just 30 counted in 2007, new data from 10,000 photographs taken by camera traps across 500,000 ha shows at least 57 leopards in Russia’s Land of the Leopard National Park, which includes all known leopard breeding areas as well as important tiger numbers. Next steps include creation of a China-Russia transboundary nature reserve.  

The population of the endangered Mongolian saiga antelope has increased more than fourfold – from 2,950 in 1998 to 13,000 in 2014. Since the near extinction of the saiga in the late 1980s, WWF has been actively working to conserve the antelope.


Original article posted on: 24.02.15      Updated: 12.03.15
Nezhinskii is a male amur leopard (<i>Panthera pardus orientalis</i>). He was the first leopard that we photographed back in 2002 when we started experimenting with camera traps in this area.
Nezhinskii is a male amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis). He was the first leopard that we photographed back in 2002 when we started experimenting with camera traps in this area.
© WWF-Russia / ISUNR Enlarge

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