National recognition to the importance of wetlands | WWF
National recognition to the importance of wetlands

Posted on 04 February 2019

« We owe it to ourselves to restore degraded wetlands in order to keep humans and animals alive. It must also be ensured that their management fits into sustainability », as Narisoa Andoniaina, Regional Director of Environment and Sustainable Development in Menabe, concluded it.
Without mangroves, crabs and shrimp would not exist. If lakes and rivers dry up, it would be impossible for many humans to survive. Without the coral reefs, there would be no fish. While five of the largest Malagasy cities are on the coast, few Malagasy realize how essential wetlands are for us.
 
The Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development is the bearer of World Wetlands Day celebration on February 2 of each year. This year, once again, thousands of people took advantage of exhibitions in Antananarivo to discover and learn about Malagasy wetlands. Professionals, experts, students or simple passers-by met in the garden of Antaninarenina during the weekend. « We take part in the celebration of this day every year because we believe ont the importance of these wetlands. And we want to raise awareness among young people. For some time now, there has been a start of effort and responsibility on the part of these young people, which is really encouraging, » said Haintsonisainana Andriantsoa, ​​president of the association YES Mada (Young Evergreen Students Madagascar).
 
« The conservation of wetlands is a priority for Malagasy government » according to Narisoa Andoniaina, Regional Director of Environment and Sustainable Development in Menabe. « We owe it to ourselves to restore degraded wetlands in order to keep humans and animals alive. It must also be ensured that their management fits into sustainability » she concluded. This region has five of the 20 Malagasy wetlands included in the Ramsar Convention for Wetlands of International Importance: Tsimembo Manambolomaty, Ambondrombe, Ambondro-Sirave, Bedo Lake and Tsiribihina Mangroves. Led by the Menabe Region and supported by environmental stakeholders including WWF, more than 300 people have restored the Kimony mangroves in Morondava in February 2nd.