Bonn climate meeting: missed opportunity, all eyes on Unga, G20 and Bangkok | WWF
Bonn climate meeting: missed opportunity, all eyes on Unga, G20 and Bangkok

Posted on 14 August 2009

Delegates in Bonn missed an opportunity to speed up progress of climate negotiations ahead of a series of high-level political meetings next month, WWF said.
Bonn, Germany –Delegates in Bonn missed an opportunity to speed up progress of climate negotiations ahead of a series of high-level political meetings next month, WWF said.

Negotiators who gathered in Germany for another round of United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) talks concluding today made some steps forward, but they didn’t reach the speed needed to achieve a strong climate agreement in Copenhagen at the end of this year.

A key stumbling block was still the level and the source of financial support for poor countries. The growing number of countries supporting the idea of Copenhagen delivering a legally binding outcome was a positive sign.

The attention now shifts to September when a series of crucial political meetings takes place: the United Nations General Assembly, the Major Economies Forum, and the G20, all dealing with climate change.

“We would have liked the Parties of the UNFCCC to use the opportunity and take initiative. But delegates spent too much time arguing over procedures and technicalities. This is not the way overcome mistrust between rich and poor nations,” said Kim Carstensen, the head of WWF Global Climate Initiative.

“Delegates are kept back by political gridlock. The political leaders must now unblock the process.”

The recent commitments during the G8 and MEF meetings on 2°C were reflected in the climate talks in Bonn, but they were not enough to set the negotiations on a pathway to success. ”

“If the meetings of the General Assembly, the Major Economies Forum and the G20 in September are successful in building the political momentum needed, the UN negotiations can progress much faster at the next meeting in October in Bangkok.”

WWF would like the G20 meeting in late September to make a commitment to 3-4 viable means of mobilizing resources at the scale of $160 billion per year, in order to set the stage for success in Copenhagen.

“Without commitments on funding, it is impossible to design a solid climate agreement. It is like asking a manager to run a company without telling him what his budget is.”


Climate change increases the nuzmber and strength of extreme weather events - and the subsequent catastrophes, like Hurrican Mitch in Honduras in 1997.
© WWF / Nigel DICKINSON