Borneo’s Biodiversity

Dense forest landscape of the northeast tip of Borneo, in the Malaysian state of Sabah, the habitat ... rel=
Dense forest landscape of the northeast tip of Borneo, in the Malaysian state of Sabah, the habitat of the endemic Bornean Pygmy elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis). Sabah, North Borneo, Malaysia.
© WWF-Canon / A. Christy WILLIAMS
The island of Borneo, the third largest island in the world, is in the cradle of a region rich in biodiversity. Here, an amazing variety of plants coexist, including more than 2,000 types of trees and rafflesia, the world's largest flower.
These rain forests not only provide habitat for elephants and rhinos, but are also home to a vast array of creatures, from giant moths to flying squirrels, giant hornbills to color-changing lizards.

These many species are tied to each other and their habitat in ways that scientists are just beginning to understand. Indeed, humans are also part of the equation. Many people depend on the rain forest as a source of food and shelter and it’s an important asset to local economies as well.

Maps of the region
http://worldwildlife.org/expeditions/borneo/map.htm

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