WWF: history, people, operations

WWF was born into this world in 1961.

It was the product of a deep concern held by a few eminent gentlemen who were worried by what they saw happening in our world at that time.
Since those early days WWF has grown up to be one of the largest environmental organizations in the world.

Currently there are more than 1300 WWF conservation projects underway around the world.

The vast majority of these focus on local issues. They range from school nature gardens in Zambia, to initiatives that appear on the packaging in your local supermarket. From the restoration of orangutan habitats to the establishment of giant panda reserves.

Almost all our work involves partnerships.

We team up with local non-profit agencies and other global NGOs. We form relationships with village elders, local councils and regional government offices. And in this day and age of globalization, critically, we work with businesses who are willing to change.

But our most important partnership is with you.
  • Your support means we have the necessary strength to engage with national governments and global agencies like the World Bank.
  • Your support means we have the network to reach out to isolated tribes in the Congo and the Amazon.
  • Your support means we can have real successes and lasting breakthrough in the conservation efforts for our one and only planet.

So who is WWF?

Realistically? 

We are nothing without you.

What do we want?

A healthy, happy, thriving, living and ultimately diverse and wonderful world. Now wouldn't that be an all round good thing?

The initials WWF

WWF is a non-profit (charity) foundation with its Secretariat based in Gland, Switzerland.

Virtual Gifts

Virtual Gifts / ©: WWF

 / ©: WWF
WWF was born into this world in 1961.
© WWF

Half a century of nature conservation

In 2011 WWF celebrated its 50th anniversary!

From its origins as a small group of committed wildlife enthusiasts, WWF has grown into one of the world's largest and most respected independent conservation organizations – supported by 5 million people and active in over 100 countries on five continents.

Over this time, WWF's focus has evolved from localized efforts in favour of single species and individual habitats to an ambitious strategy to preserve biodiversity and achieve sustainable development across the globe.

Read more

WWF's Mission Statement

To stop the degradation of the planet's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by:

  • conserving the world's biological diversity
  • ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable
  • promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.

WWF's Guiding Principles

To guide WWF in its task of achieving the mission, the following principles have been adopted. WWF will:

  • be global, independent, multicultural and non party political
  • use the best available scientific information to address issues and critically evaluate all its endeavours
  • seek dialogue and avoid unnecessary confrontation
  • build concrete conservation solutions through a combination of field based projects, policy initiatives, capacity building and education work
  • involve local communities and indigenous peoples in the planning and execution of its field programmes, respecting their cultural as well as economic needs
  • strive to build partnerships with other organizations, governments, business and local communities to enhance WWF’s effectiveness
  • run its operations in a cost effective manner and apply donors’ funds according to the highest standards of accountability.

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