Improved livestock husbandry

Improved livestock management practices are crucial for reducing HWC involving predators. The use of a person and/or dogs to walk with the livestock can have a significant positive impact (Stander 2005). However, herding practices are in decline, particularly as young boys who would normally be used as herders now go to school.

The #Khoadi //hoas conservancy actively encourages its members to revert to herding livestock as much as possible. Anatolian Shepherd dogs have been shown to be particularly effective in guarding against cheetah (Stander 2005), but have relatively high maintenance costs compared to village dogs which can also be effective.

Kraaling the cattle at night in strong enclosures is another important method of reducing predation and can be encouraged and financially supported as part of local HWC Management plans in conservancies.

Stander (2005) suggests that active management by controlling breeding times and grazing areas can lead to synchronised births, which aid the protection of cows and calves against carnivores.

Local farmer with his cattle herded together in a corral for the night, which is a pre-condition ... / ©: WWF-Canon / Folke WULF
Local farmer with his cattle herded together in a corral for the night, which is a pre-condition for any villager in the Conservancy to receive compensation for cattle killed by an elephant attack. Kaskia village, East Caprivi, Namibia.
© WWF-Canon / Folke WULF

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