The project - Step 2

Implement scientific research and ecological monitoring programmes

Mediko Tobic, local turtle researcher, Ebodje. Buffer zone of Campo-Ma'an National Park, Cameroon ... / ©: WWF-Canon / Olivier van Bogaert
Mediko Tobic, local turtle researcher, Ebodje. Buffer zone of Campo-Ma'an National Park, Cameroon 2004.
© WWF-Canon / Olivier van Bogaert
Patrols in the park are now gathering scientific data on fauna, vegetation, and topography.
All collected information is computerized and analyzed. In due time, this data could provide useful indications on the dynamics of the park's animal populations.

In addition, WWF has established a partnership with the Antwerp Zoo in Belgium, and its Great Apes Project.

As part of this agreement, volunteers, who usually stay many months in the park, are carrying out inventories of fauna to complete existing data on the number and distribution of great apes and other large mammals.

Another idea behind these inventories is to study the feasibility of an ecotourism scheme based on gorilla watching.

There are also early plans to launch a gorilla habituation programme, which consists of accustoming gorillas to the presence of tourists on their territory.

The partnership with the Antwerp Zoo further includes fundraising efforts to intensify scientific research in the park and buffer zone.

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