Building the future of Thailand’s Conservation



Posted on 13 June 2014
Students participate during the indoor portion of the training.
Students participate during the indoor portion of the training.
© WWF-ThailandEnlarge
WWF-Thailand’s Tiger and Prey recovery project together with Kasersart University’s Faculty of Forestry gave the opportunity to students to experience conservation field work and educate them on the work that WWF and Thailand's Department of National Parks carries out at Mae Wong National Park and Khlong Lan National Park. WWF recognizes these students as future conservation leaders, since students graduating from this field in Thailand end up working to serve Department of National Parks or environment conservation NGOs like WWF.

The students went through a six-day training, during which time they learned through firsthand experience how to trace footprints of wildlife, look out for threats, use camera traps, collect data, and the other basics of SMART patrolling. After the indoor training, the students - under the supervision of faculty staff - got to practice their new skills in real surroundings while accompanying forest rangers for two nights of live smart patrolling. The students returned with an unforgettable experience filled with knowledge, adventure, fun and a promise to serve, save and sustain Thailand’s ecosystems and biodiversity.

As for Khlong Lan and Mae Wong National Parks, these protected areas continue to be of significant importance for the future of Tigers in Thailand.  
Students participate during the indoor portion of the training.
Students participate during the indoor portion of the training.
© WWF-Thailand Enlarge
Students learn about various aspects of SMART patrolling, including how to track animal footprints.
Students learn about various aspects of SMART patrolling, including how to track animal footprints.
© WWF-Thailand Enlarge
Student participants are geared up to head out for the outdoor portion of the training.
Student participants are geared up to head out for the outdoor portion of the training.
© WWF-Thailand Enlarge

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