WWF and Central Investigation Bureau formalize partnership to curb wildlife crimes in Nepal



Posted on 19 June 2014  | 
Uttam Kumar Karki, Officiating Director of CIB and Anil Manandhar, Country Representative of WWF Nepal formally signed the MoU on 18 June.
© Simrika Sharma/ WWF NepalEnlarge
 Kathmandu, Nepal – Nepal’s fight against wildlife crimes received a new impetus with the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between WWF Nepal and the Central Investigation Bureau (CIB) of Nepal Police on 18 June.

The five-year MoU formalizes the comprehensive long-term partnership existing between the CIB and WWF to curb wildlife crimes in Nepal. Under the MoU, the CIB will work through an independent pillar, Environmental Crime, catering specifically to wildlife crime control. The CIB will increase policing action, both in strength and numbers, through its regional, zonal and district cells to investigate and prosecute crimes related to the killing and trade of endangered wildlife and their body parts. WWF Nepal will provide financial and technical support to the CIB together with providing capacity building opportunities and aided technologies for effective wildlife crime control.

“This MoU reflects our shared vision and underscores our commitment to make zero poaching the norm in Nepal,” stated Mr. Uttam Kumar Karki, Senior Superintendent of Police and Officiating Director of CIB. “Through this partnership, we hope to address one of the biggest threats to wildlife not just in Nepal but across the world.”

Nepal has, over the years, made significant strides in curbing illegal wildlife trade under the leadership of the government with the seamless efforts of the Nepal Police, Nepal Army, park authorities and local communities, and the support of partner agencies such as WWF. Zero Poaching Year was marked in 2011 and 2013 as a milestone in achieving increased protection for tigers and rhinos. Nepal was also able to crack down on an entire criminal network involved in the illegal trade of rhino horns, and recorded the largest ever seizure of wildlife parts in the country in 2013 where enforcement agencies were successful in confiscating 1,583 kg of Tibetan antelope wool, eight full-size tiger skins and bones of 11 tigers.

“Illegal wildlife trade is a threat not only to the iconic species such as tigers and rhinos but also to our years of conservation efforts”, stated Mr. Anil Manandhar, Country Representative of WWF Nepal. “We are proud to be the government’s trusted partner in ensuring wildlife is better protected and Nepal’s conservation wins are sustained over time.”
Uttam Kumar Karki, Officiating Director of CIB and Anil Manandhar, Country Representative of WWF Nepal formally signed the MoU on 18 June.
© Simrika Sharma/ WWF Nepal Enlarge

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