Overview of the Mozambican Deep-Water Shrimp Fishery Improvement Project
WWF - Mozambican Deep-Water Shrimp Fishery Improvement Project

Mozambican Deep-Water Shrimp Fishery Improvement Project

Overview of Project

The Mozambican deep-water shrimp FIP process commenced in 2009, when the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) pre-assessment for this fishery was completed. This work laid the foundation for the development of a FIP scoping document that outlines potential strategies for addressing deficiencies identified in the pre-assessment. In May 2010, WWF held a FIP stakeholder meeting in Maputo, Mozambique to develop a FIP Action Plan, which describes the necessary FIP activities, with associated responsible parties and timeframes required to meet the MSC standard. Implementation of FIP activities began in August 2010 when the FIP Action Plan was finalized. In March 2012, WWF held a FIP review meeting in Maputo, Mozambique to review the progress toward objectives outlined in the Action Plan, and to identify any new activities that may need to be undertaken. The latest FIP review was done in May 2013 and the results were used to update the Action Plan.
Last updated July 2013

Fisheries Improvement Project Stage

Implementation & Review

Species for Certification
Pink prawn (Haliporoides triarthrus)
Red prawn (Aristaemorpha foliacae)

Fishery Background

Volume – approximately 4,000 mt of biomass for all five species of deep-water shrimps with a recommended total allowable catch of 2,500 mt
Gear – Single bottom trawl nets (55 mm codend) with otter boards
Location – The fishery extends along the coast of Mozambique between 17º 00´ (Angoche) and 25º 40´ South (border with South Africa). The fishery extends seaward to the shelf edge on suitably muddy substrates, and ranges from 200 m to 700 m in depth.

FIP Stakeholders

The main stakeholders involved in this FIP include: WWF, the Ministry of Fisheries (the the National Administration for Fisheries (ADNAP), the National Institute for Fisheries Research (IIP) and the deep-water shrimp Industry.

Project Background

The Mozambican deep-water shrimp FIP process commenced in 2009, when the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) pre-assessment for this fishery was completed. This work laid the foundation for the development of a FIP scoping document that outlines potential strategies for addressing deficiencies identified in the pre-assessment. In May 2010, WWF held a FIP stakeholder meeting in Maputo, Mozambique to develop a FIP Action Plan, which describes the necessary FIP activities, with associated responsible parties and timeframes required to meet the MSC standard. Implementation of FIP activities began in August 2010 when the FIP Action Plan was finalized.

In March 2012, WWF held a FIP review meeting in Maputo, Mozambique to review the progress toward objectives outlined in the Action Plan, and to identify any new activities that may need to be undertaken. The latest FIP review was done in May 2013 and the results were used to update the Action Plan.

Deficiencies Raised in the Pre-Assessment

In the pre-assessment, a number of MSC performance indicators (PIs) were scored such that the fishery would likely either fail under an MSC full assessment (score less than 60) or pass with conditions (score between 60 and 80). These included lack of fishery-specific harvest controls, lack of information on the status of the primary bycatch species, uncertainty regarding habitat impacts, and limited monitoring.

Key Accomplishments

The work done by FIP stakeholders to date has resulted in many accomplishments, some of which include the following:
  • The establishment of a FIP/MSC Steering Committee to assist in the implementation of the Action Plan;
  • Identification of Unit of Certification (Haliporoides triarthus and Aristaemorpha foliacea);
  • Identification of the Client (Industry);
  • Export market analysis conducted for deepwater species - including assessment of exports and species breakdown, country export analysis;
  • Spatial and temporal analysis of effort accomplished, to assist in the development of an ecosystem-based management strategy;
  • GIS course to improve fisheries mapping;
  • Elaboration of the fishery management plan (draft);
  • Development of the new loogbook that includes data on retained and discarded bycatch;
  • Training of captains for logbook data entry;
  • Improvement of the database for data analysis;
  • Stock assessment of the two main species conducted;
  • Ongoing deployment of scientific observers on board commercial vessels;
  • Improvement of the scientific sampling forms on board on commercial vessels which now includes information on Endangered, Threatened and Protected Species;
  • Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) in place;
  • Approval of a new fisheries law that now includes rights based management:
Next Steps

A number of FIP activities outlined in the Action Plan still need to be implemented by FIP stakeholders in order for the fishery to meet the MSC standard. These activities include:
  • Finalize the management plan (include harvest control rules and research plan);
  • Improve the spatial and temporal evaluation of the Deepwater Shrimp Fishery and link with substrate analysis;
  • Undertake ecosystem modeling;
  • Analyze data on retained species, bycatch, discards and ETP species;
  • Improve the catch-recording system for traceability;
  • Update stock assessment on the two main species

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