Ready: Final draft of the strategy for sustainable tourism in the Carpathians



Posted on 28 July 2014  | 
The Retezat Mountains are one of the highest massifs in Romania, being part of the Southern Carpathians.
The Retezat Mountains are one of the highest massifs in Romania, being part of the Southern Carpathians.
© Dan DinuEnlarge
The final draft of the strategy for sustainable tourism in the Carpathians will be discussed by representatives of governments, NGOs, businesses and international organizations.

The half-day forum starts at 10 am on 23 September 2014 in Hotel Galant, Mikulov, Czech Republic.

The draft is ready for adoption two days later at the 4th Conference of the Parties of the Carpathian Convention.

The conference will present case studies on sustainable tourism in the Carpathians. Stakeholders will discuss ways and means of implementing the strategy and how to connect it to other cross-European initiatives. Discussions will be held on the contents and the organizations that would work for the implementation of the strategy.

The discussion will be facilitated by Michael Meyer and Martina Voskarova of Ecological Tourism in Europe - E.T.E.

Participants planning to attend any of the 4th Conference of the Parties of the Carpathian Convention, 23-26 September 2014 in Mikulov have to register on the website of the convention before 31 July 2014.

The Carpathian Sustainable Tourism Strategy is being developed under the umbrella of the Carpathian Convention. In 2010, a protocol on sustainable tourism was adopted by the conference of the seven parties to the Carpathian Convention, which provides a legally binding framework for the development of sustainable tourism in the Carpathians.

To assure the implementation of the protocol, a special project - “Development of a Sustainable Tourism Strategy for the Carpathians” (CarpatSusTourStrat) - will elaborate a strategy for the Carpathians in coordination with all relevant stakeholders to be up for adoption at the next Conference of the Parties to the Carpathian Convention in September 2014. The project is managed by Ecological Tourism in Europe (E.T.E.) with the support of WWF, CEEweb for Biodiversity, the Interim Secretariat of the Carpathian Convention, and the Carpathian Network of Protected Areas.

Over the course of the project, various meetings with stakeholders are being organized – at a national, regional and local level, including state, non-governmental and private stakeholders - to reflect their opinions and needs in the strategy.

Additionally, 14 tourism development initiatives are compiled and the process of the elaboration of the strategy is documented. This will potentially serve as a model for others which attempt to develop sustainable tourism strategies.

The project runs until November 2014 and is financially supported by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Protection and Nuclear Safety.

The Carpathian Convention with the Interim Secretariat, based at United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) - Vienna, aims to protect and sustainably develop the Carpathians by improving the quality of life, strengthening local economies and communities, and the conservation of natural values and cultural heritage.

The Framework Convention on the Protection and Sustainable Development of the Carpathians (Carpathian Convention) was adopted and signed by the seven Parties (Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovak Republic, Ukraine) in May 2003 in Kyiv, Ukraine, and entered into force in January 2006. It is the only multi-level governance mechanism covering the whole of the Carpathian area and, besides the Alpine Convention, the second sub-regional treaty-based regime for the protection and sustainable development of a mountain region worldwide.

WWF has been an important player in the development of the Carpathian Convention from the very beginning and seeks to support the implementation of the convention through various projects related to nature conservation and regional development.
The Retezat Mountains are one of the highest massifs in Romania, being part of the Southern Carpathians.
The Retezat Mountains are one of the highest massifs in Romania, being part of the Southern Carpathians.
© Dan Dinu Enlarge
The Danube-Carpathian Summit, organised in 2001 in Bucuresti by WWF and the Romanian Government, brought together 18 heads of state. The high-level meeting eventually led to establishment of the Carpathian Convention.
© WWF-DCPO Enlarge
The primeval beech forests of the Eastern Carpathians in Slovakia and Ukraine are characterised not only by giant living trees but also by deadwood, which is vital to the habitat and ecosystem.
© Juraj Vysoky Enlarge

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