Yellow water lily returns to biggest Danube island in Bulgaria



Posted on 09 May 2013  | 
Yellow water lilies return to Persin island.
© WWFEnlarge
The restoration of rare plant species in the marshes of Persin Nature Park in the Bulgarian stretch of the Lower Danube is entering a new stage. Over the past few weeks, 20 Yellow water lilies were taken from Veleka river in Strandja in the south-east of Bulgaria, and transferred to two marshes on Persin island on the Danube. Conservationists at Persin Nature Park expect that gradually the number of water lilies will increase.

The marshes of Persin (Belene) island were restored four years ago. The return of the protected Yellow water lily will allow the species to re-establish itself in the wetlands of the park. In the past, the island of Persin hosted one of the biggest water lily colonies in the country, but the plant disappeared from the island because of the destruction of its wetlands.

Besides being beautiful flowers, water lilies play many useful roles in nature. A variety of rare and endangered species live off them. For example, many birds nest on their leaves on the water surface and fish hide below them.

Four more plant species are being restored in Persin Nature Park, including White water lilies.

The work is financed by the LIFE+ Programme of the European Union under a project carried out by WWF in partnership with the Executive Agency of Forestry. The project aims to protect and restore 11 habitat types in 10 of Bulgaria’s nature parks. The restoration of water lilies is carried out under the supervision of the Regional Inspectorate of Environment and Water, Rousse, and with the approval of the Ministry of Environment and Water.
Yellow water lilies return to Persin island.
© WWF Enlarge
Conservationists expect that gradually the number of water lilies will begin to increase naturally.
Conservationists expect that gradually the number of water lilies will begin to increase naturally.
© WWF DCPO Enlarge

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