/ ©: Students on Ice / WWF

Sailing to Siku

The voyage to the Last Ice Area


Sailing to the heart of the Arctic where summer sea ice is projected to last the longest.
In July and August 2012, scientists and WWF experts explored the Last Ice Area -- the northwest coast of Greenland and Canada’s High Arctic Islands. Along the way, we conducted research and spoke with local communities to fill in the knowledge gaps about this remote area.

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© Students on Ice / WWF-Canon © Martin von Mirbach / WWF-Canon © Students on Ice / WWF-Canon © Students on Ice / WWF-Canon © Clive Tesar / WWF-Canon © Students on Ice / WWF-Canon © Students on Ice / WWF-Canon © Students on Ice / WWF-Canon © Students on Ice / WWF-Canon © Students on Ice / WWF-Canon © Students on Ice / WWF-Canon © Students on Ice / WWF

Why we sailed to Siku

“Siku” is the word for “sea ice” in Inuktitut, the language of Inuit.

As the climate warms, Arctic sea ice is disappearing. Almost every summer, the amount of remaining ice gets smaller. That summer ice is vitally important to a whole range of animals from tiny shrimp to vast bowhead whales, and to local people.

One stretch of ice is projected to remain when all other large areas of summer ice are gone. This is the Last Ice Area.

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