Amazon Ecosystem-based Conservation Vision implementing the biodiversity Aichi Targets



Posted on 11 October 2012  | 
The 20 Aichi Targets seek to address the underlying causes of biodiversity loss by mainstreaming biodiversity across government and society.

Hyderabad, India. October 11th, 2012
– There is a need to accelerate the expansion of the global protected areas network in priority regions, as the Amazon Region for example, and expand management effectiveness assessments, improve the connectivity of protected areas and the integration of surrounding landscapes and seascapes. This is due to the importance of developing ecological networks and protected areas systems to achieve a greater representation in conservation and contributions to climate regulation. Those have been the key points of debate in the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).

During CBD Conference of Parties (CoP-11), being held in Hyderabad, India, the progress in the implementation of the Action Plan (2010-2020) of the Amazon Ecosystem-based Conservation Vision was presented as an opportunity to accelerate the implementation of the Aichi Targets. Julia Miranda, the National Parks Director and the Coordinator of the Latin-American Network for Technical Cooperation in National Parks, Other Protected Areas, Wild Flora and Fauna (REDPARQUES), explained that the implementation of this Action Plan will contribute to guarantee an ecological healthy Amazon Biome that maintains its environmental and cultural contribution to local communities, Indigenous Peoples, the countries of the region, and the world.

“Working together in a common vision in the Amazon, the countries –in partnership with technical networks, CBD Secretariat, IUCN, and WWF– can strengthen the effective identification of conservation opportunity areas, considering representativity, climate change and functionality and complement the national gap analysis with a regional approach. Moreover, this has improved the cooperation among countries on relevant issues such protected areas management effectiveness”, stated Julia Miranda during the side event at CBD CoP-11.

Amazon countries
In the side-event the Directors of Protected Areas of Brazil and Peru made interventions supporting this regional effort. “The Amazon biome contains today 2.16 % of all protected areas worldwide and 76% of protected areas that were established in the world between 2003 and 2009, this effort has been supported by Amazon Protected Areas Programme (ARPA) in the Brazilian Amazon” stated Ana Paula Prates, Protected Areas Director at Brazilian Environment Ministry.

Besides, Prates mentioned that “at last CoP of the Ramsar Convention, we support the idea of the Colombian Government to develop also a complementary regional action implementation in the Amazon. This will strengthen the cooperation between the CBD and the Ramsar Convention.” And those initiatives, together, will make the Amazon an implementing model of global conventions, added Ximena Barrera from WWF Living Amazon Initiative.

The delegate from SERNAP Peru, Rudy Valdivia stated: “We recognise the importance to work with the countries in transboundary areas in regions such as the one of the Tri-National Programme, which is an initiative of the protected areas of Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, as a concrete example of the implementation of the Amazon Conservation Vision”.

“Currently there is a LifeWeb Expression of Interest for the Amazon Conservation Vision, and we are inviting potential donors to support more action and implementation through this concrete innovative regional approach”, stated Charles Bessanson, coordinator of the CBD LifeWeb Initiative who was chairing the side event. “This is an invitation to be part of this initiative and support the current efforts in the Amazon Region”, added Ximena.

Aichi Targets
According to the Protected Areas Report 2012, compiled by UNEP-WCMC, in cooperation with IUCN and other partners, related to tracking the progress towards global targets for protected areas, there are still challenges for the implementation of the target 11.

“We believe that in the Amazon the whole is more than the sum of the parts and only through far-reaching and powerful partnerships with governments, civil society, aid agencies, private sector, regional conventions and agreements and other stakeholders at national and regional level, will achieve the transformational processes needed to bring about an alternative scenario for the most important regions in the planet”, stated Kathy Mackinnon, from the IUCN WCPA.

Julia Miranda said the Amazon Vision has improved the cooperation among countries on relevant issues, such protected areas management effectiveness, key elements for the implementation of the Aichi Targets. “In these regional efforts, for the implementation of the Aichi Targets, it is important to support three aspects: monitoring, capacity and finance.”

Claudio Maretti, WWF Living Amazon Initiative leader, explains that protected areas cannot be seen just as isolated spaces to protect species, but an opportunity to promote sustainable development, particularly in the case of the Amazon Region. “Environmental degradation is affecting health, local economies and is a growing source of conflicts. The importance of the protected area system in the region is to ensure the conservation of biodiversity, curbing deforestation and maintaining the provision of essential ecological services including water systems, climate change mitigation, and social and cultural richness”.


Notes:

(1) Over 190 nations signatories of the CBD, are meeting in Hyderabad, India (8 to 19 October 2012), to discuss the implementation of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), a legally binding treaty for the conservation of biodiversity, the sustainable use of its components and the fair and equitable sharing of
benefits arising from the utilization of genetic resources of our planet.

(2) Two years ago, at the CBD CoP-10, in Nagoya, Japan, governments agreed to a strategic plan (2010-2020), the Aichi Targets (Biodiversity Strategic Plan) and the Nagoya Protocol, to embark into the world in the development of concrete actions that would help prevent further extinctions of species and the deterioration of the world's most valuable nature.

(3) The 20 Aichi Targets seek to address the underlying causes of biodiversity loss by mainstreaming biodiversity across government and society. The target 11 indicates that By 2010 at least 17 per cent of terrestrial and inland water, and 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, especially areas of particular importance for biodiversity and ecosystem services, are conserved through systems of protected areas managed effectively and equitably, ecologically representative and well-connected and other measures of effective area-based conservation, and integrated into the landscape and seascape wider.

(4) The Amazon Conservation Vision was developed since the II Latin American Congress for National Parks and other Protected Areas (Bariloche, October 2007), where the importance of developing ecological networks and protected areas systems at all levels, with a particular emphasis on the Amazon Region was recognised, as a way to build complementarities with national systems of protected areas and achieve a greater representation in conservation and contribute to climate regulation. The Regional Report and the Action Plan of the Amazon Ecosystem-based Conservation Vision (protected areas) was prepared after a series of workshops and studies, was launched in the CBD CoP-10, in Nagoya, October 2010, supported by the Ministers of the Environment of the Amazon Countries. Moreover, the initiative is recognised by the Decision X.31 adopted in Japan.

(5) The Regional Report and Action Plan of the Amazon Ecosystem-based Conservation Vision (protected areas) is available from the partners, updated (post CBD CoP-10), as well as in the 2012  is available for download up in this page.
In Spanish it can be found at http://wwf.panda.org/es/donde_trabajamos/iniciativas_globales/amazonia/noticias/?206505/Visin-de-Conservacin-basada-en-el-Ecosistema-para-el-Amazonas-implementando-los-Objetivos-de-Aichi-para-la-biodiversidad





Rio Pinquen, Manu National Park, Amazon Rainforest, Peru.
Rio Pinquen, Manu National Park, Amazon Rainforest, Peru.
© WWF-Canon / André BÄRTSCHI Enlarge

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