WWF: 100% Renewable Power is Possible as Shown by Breakthrough McKinsey Study | WWF

WWF: 100% Renewable Power is Possible as Shown by Breakthrough McKinsey Study

Posted on 13 April 2010    
Hydroelectric power stations, such as this one on the Danube River, generate energy that is renewable but not always sustainable.
© © Michel GUNTHER / WWF
Brussels, Belgium – The launch today of a ground breaking study by McKinsey on various options for a carbon-free European power sector by 2050 is welcomed by WWF for showing that a 100% renewable electricity system would be as reliable as our power system today and would reduce Europe’s fossil fuel import costs.

Commissioned by the European Climate Foundation (ECF), and in consultation with many large electricity companies and other organisations, the study shows that a 100% renewable electricity supply would only be 5 - 10% more expensive than the other low-carbon pathways considered in the study, without the risks posed by nuclear energy and fossil fuels, making it overall the best option.

 "Our vision of 100% renewable power for Europe by 2050 is supported by this study", said Dr Stephan Singer, Director Global Energy Policy at WWF International at the launch of the study.

"The EU must now get to work, planning its long-term energy strategy based on 100% renewable power. This will be good for the climate, phase out risks of nuclear power and fuel import dependency, guarantee power supply, and would provide the most cost-effective and acceptable sustainable energy pathway for Europe."

Further information:
Dr Stephan Singer, Director Global Energy Policy, WWF International
Tel: +32 2 743 88 17
Mobile: +32 496 550 709
E-mail: ssinger@wwfepo.org

Jason Anderson, Head of EU Climate and Energy Policy, WWF European Policy Office
Mobile: +32 474 837 603
E-mail: janderson@wwfepo.org

Stephanie Rhomberg, Communications and Press Officer Climate & Energy, WWF European Policy Office Tel: +32 2 743 88 06
Mobile: +32 495 273 319
E-mail: srhomberg@wwfepo.org


Hydroelectric power stations, such as this one on the Danube River, generate energy that is renewable but not always sustainable.
© © Michel GUNTHER / WWF Enlarge

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