Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor

More than 1 billion people live in poor urban communities. Over 300 million do not have access to safe water. Over 400 million do not have access to adequate sanitation.
Water & Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP) is a not-for-profit partnership between non-governmental organizations like WWF, the private sector and academia that offers a new approach to the challenge of urban water and sanitation.

WSUP helps utilities, municipalities and other local service providers to offer sustainable water and sanitation services, promote good hygiene and raise the health and environmental standards of the community.

Since 2006, WSUP supported projects in Africa and South Asia have improved access to safe, affordable water for over 127,000 people, improved sanitation for 20,000 and improved hygiene for over 120,000 people. WSUP has strengthened the capacity of local service providers in towns and cities in eight countries, and has contributed to the development of processes and policies that improve the lives of the urban poor.

WSUP is fundamentally a partnership, with each member organization bringing a unique set of skills and knowledge to the design and delivery of programmes. While each organisation is recognised as an expert in its field, it’s the cooperation under WSUP that yields innovative and lasting solutions.

WWF understands that delivery of sustainable water and sanitation services requires managing our freshwater resources wisely. As a member of WSUP, WWF works directly with service providers to incorporate environmental sustainability into their programmes, ensuring that projects are planned, constructed and managed in ways that have a positive effect on both the local environment and the wider watershed.

WWF also helps raise awareness about vulnerability to climate change and searches for ways in which service providers can be prepared for uncertainties ahead. By making the environment an integral part of WSUP's projects, WWF is contributing to the Millennium Development Goals in a way that promotes good management of water resources today and for years to come.


 / ©: WWF-Canon / Nigel Dickinson
In Brazil, 40 million people have limited or no access to drinking water and sanitation services. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
© WWF-Canon / Nigel Dickinson
In Brazil, 40 million people have limited or no access to drinking water and sanitation services.

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