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	© Marine Stewardship Council (MSC)

Sustainable markets

Raising standards and market access

WWF collaborates with partners along the entire fish supply chain in an effort to pursue that fish and seafood sold on the global market place is traceable, sustainably caught and increasingly sourced through the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC), a voluntary, independent certification scheme that rewards sustainable fishing practices and sets environmental and social standards.

Fisheries products labeled under the MSC standard come to the market with a chain-of-custody certification that provides traceability for a growing list of seafood products.  They have been independently assessed to ensure a fishery is well-managed and sustainable.

Find out more about WWF´s involvement in the MSC programme.

Marine Stewardship Council  
	© WWF
Marine Stewardship Council
© WWF

The easiest way to identify the best environmental seafood choice currently on the market is to look out for the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) label.

Daniel Suddaby, Deputy Leader Smart Fishing Initiative

Mobilize key market players

Fish traders, processors, retailers and also consumers can demand and stimulate more transparency through their sourcing and purchasing decisions – by selectively buying seafood products from fisheries with low or no bycatch, and that have been certified according to the MSC standard

Many important fisheries are not yet managed well enough to meet sustainable standards which puts major seafood buyers and producers in a bind: they want to buy the products of certified fisheries as they are committed to improving their purchased policies. WWF is spurring fishing companies to take part in Fishery Improvement Projects (FIPs) to meet the challenge of improving their fishing practices and sourcing policies, and, where appropriate, achieve MSC certification.

WWF works with some of the most globally important seafood businesses, which have a significant impact on supply chains, to help them transition to responsibly sourced seafood. Examples of companies WWF is collaborating with includes Coles, Coop, John West, Edeka, Wal-Mart, Sodexo, Sainsbury´s and Carrefour.  

Other partners include the International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF) or  the Common Fisheries Reform Alliance.


 

Some examples of our partners


 

How you can help

Find out how you can do your part as a company ►
Avoid seafood from problematic fisheries. Want to identify these? Check out WWF´s seafood guides
 
	© Coles
Coles logo
© Coles
In 2011, WWF and Coles partnered to improve the sustainability of the company’s seafood supply.
 
	© Coles
Coles/WWF seafood partnership
© Coles
 
	© Coop
Coop logo
© Coop
Communities in the Philippines and Laos are benefiting directly from a Swiss retailer´s investments into sustainable supply chains.
 
	© WWF Georg Scattolin
tuna fishing vessel
© WWF Georg Scattolin
 
	© International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF)
International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF) Logo
© International Seafood Sustainability Foundation (ISSF)
WWF is working with scientists and tuna processors to make sure all tuna stocks are managed sustainably.
 
	© Wetjens Dimmlich, WWF Smart Fishing Initiative
Tuna processing
© Wetjens Dimmlich, WWF Smart Fishing Initiative
 
	© WWF/SFI
Tuna, Maldives
© WWF/SFI
MSC certification in the Maldives has made big waves across the Indian Ocean.
 
	© Wetjens Dimmlich, WWF Smart Fishing Initiative
Fishnets, Maldives
© Wetjens Dimmlich, WWF Smart Fishing Initiative

Did you know that

    • Wordwide, more than 25.000 products can be traced back to MSC-certified fisheries
    • Over 130 fisheries around the world are certified today, representing 10% of global annual fish harvest

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