Urgent action needed as climate records continue to be broken | WWF

Urgent action needed as climate records continue to be broken

Posted on 22 March 2017    
Sea level rise is one of the climate impacts being experienced as global surface temperatures soar.
© NPS Climate Change Response
GLAND, Switzerland (21 March, 2017) – The State of the Global Climate report released by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) yesterday provides additional evidence that extreme weather caused by rising surface temperatures is pushing the world’s climate system into “unchartered territory”.
 
The annual statement issued by WMO confirmed that 2016 was the hottest year on record – with global surface temperatures a remarkable 1.1° C above the pre-industrial period, which is 0.06° C above the previous record set in 2015. Importantly, new research not included in the report showed that extreme weather was continuing into 2017, breaking climate records everywhere – almost 12,000 records in the US in February alone.
 
Commenting on this, WWF’s global Climate & Energy Practice leader Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, said:
 
“Global momentum for action on climate change is increasing, but as the World Meteorological Organization’s latest State of the Global Climate report reminds us, we must increase the urgency with which we act if we are to avert the worst impacts of climate change.
 
“Already, we are seeing human-caused climate change destabilising food production, increasing water scarcity and accelerating instability among our most vulnerable communities and ecosystems. There is still time to change the course we are on, but only if we act now with greater ambition”.
 
“The world leaders have already agreed a plan for climate change action. Now we must implement that plan to ensure global temperatures stay below the 1.5°C threshold set out in the Paris Agreement.
  
“Together, we must steer the transition toward a future powered by renewable energy and act to protect the biodiversity and ecosystems which underpin human survival, health and well-being to create a climate-resilient and more sustainable world for all.”
 
For further information, contact: Mandy Jean Woods mwoods@wwf.org.za  +27 72 393 0027
Sea level rise is one of the climate impacts being experienced as global surface temperatures soar.
© NPS Climate Change Response Enlarge

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