Energy transition will falter if country climate pledges are not increased | WWF

Energy transition will falter if country climate pledges are not increased

Posted on 10 November 2015    
The wind farm in Ilocos Norte, Philippines is the first large-scale wind power plant in Southeast Asia.
The wind farm in Ilocos Norte, Philippines is the first large-scale wind power plant in Southeast Asia, set up by WWF in collaboration with government and businesses.
© WWF Philippines / Vicson Chua
(Gland, Switzerland, 10 October 2015) – There are unmistakable signs that the world is heading into a global energy transition but despite this, the projected growth of renewables as a percentage of all energy supply investments is still only 15 per cent in the next 25 years.
 
Reacting to the release of the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) World Energy Report 2015, WWF’s global director of energy policy Dr Stephan Singer said WWF was concerned that while the IEA acknowledged the permanent growth of renewables, in its main scenario it projects that only 15 per cent of all energy supply investments in the next 25 years will go into renewables. “Logically, this means dirty coal might maintain a share close to one third of all electricity by 2040. This will put the global goal of staying well below 2 degrees Celsius global warming out of reach.”
 
The full phase out of coal use for energy in the OECD and Russia by 2035 and a decline in coal in developing countries as well will be needed if the world is to embark on a pathway to a fully renewable-powered economy by mid-century. “What the world needs is that in 25 years energy supply investments shall be renewables, and coal is on its way out,” he said.
 
Samantha Smith, leader of WWF’s Global Climate and Energy Initiative said the IEA was correct to appeal to governments attending the Paris COP21 to agree on a rigorous and science-based review of all climate country targets (called INDCs) to secure a renewable and ambitious pathway to energy decarbonisation for the decades to come.
 
 “It is vital that governments approve a sound, fair and science-based review process to strengthen the climate and renewable energy targets outlined by countries in their climate plans. We know that even if we comply 100 per cent with these plans, the world will still be on a path to exceeding the 2-degree global warming upper limit.”    
 
ends
 
 
Notes for Editors:
 
For further information, contact:
 
Mandy Jean Woods mwoods@wwf.org.za / @MandyJeanWoods  / +27 72 393 0027
Sam Smith ssmith@wwf.no  / @pandaclimate / +47 450 22 149
Stephan Singer  ssinger@wwf.org.za / ssinger@wwf.eu / +32 496 55 07 09
 
About WWF - WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature. The Global Climate & Energy Initiative (GCEI) is WWF’s global programme addressing climate change, promoting renewable and sustainable energy, scaling up green finance, engaging the private sector and working nationally and internationally on implementing low carbon, climate resilient development.
 
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The wind farm in Ilocos Norte, Philippines is the first large-scale wind power plant in Southeast Asia.
The wind farm in Ilocos Norte, Philippines is the first large-scale wind power plant in Southeast Asia, set up by WWF in collaboration with government and businesses.
© WWF Philippines / Vicson Chua Enlarge

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