Brisbane G20 becomes 'defacto' climate change summit | WWF

Brisbane G20 becomes 'defacto' climate change summit

Posted on 16 November 2014    
Climate change was discussed at the G20 talks, after a campaign to put the topic on the agenda
© WWF Australia
Despite Australia’s refusal to put climate change on the official agenda it has been the defining issue of the Brisbane G20, WWF said today.
 
“On any measure, climate change prevailed as a dominant economic agenda item for G20 leaders here in Brisbane,” said WWF-Australia CEO Dermot O’Gorman.
 
“Brisbane G20 may well become known as the ‘defacto’ climate change summit.
 
“By calling for action powerful leaders - including President Obama and Prime Minister Cameron – put the issue front and centre of world attention.
 
“The Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu pledged to make climate change a top priority for next year’s G20.
 
“Like inequality, gender equity and youth unemployment, climate change is one of the key economic issues of our time.
 
“The Australian Presidency could have shown leadership and used the G20 Summit to add to the momentum toward an effective United Nations’ climate change agreement in 2015 already created by the historic China-US climate change agreement.
 
Progress welcomed
 
The official G20 Communique encourages these 20 economies – which are responsible for 80% of global greenhouse emissions – to reveal their post-2020 emission targets in the first half of 2015
 
“By tabling their proposed post-2020 carbon pollution targets in the first half of next year, and hopefully sooner, G20 nations will help to build trust and political momentum within the UN climate talks.” 
 
“It’s clear the world is moving on climate change and we risk being left behind.     
 
“For Australia it’s only fair that we be prepared to commit to a 40% cut in pollution by 2025.”  
 
G20 Leaders also highlighted the importance of providing poor nations with the financial support needed to cut pollution and manage climate change risks.
 
“If we’re serious about a global solution to climate change and lifting people out of poverty, we must be prepared to invest in clean energy in developing countries.”  
 
WWF welcomed the announcements during the Summit of US$4.5 billion in funding for the Green Climate Fund by the United States of America and Japan.
 
 Missed opportunities
 
“The G20’s so called action plan on energy efficiency is a big disappointment, representing little more than a commitment to keep on talking.” 
 
Despite having a long-standing commitment to phase-out fossil fuel subsidies, the G20 failed to progress this issue in Brisbane in any meaningful way.
 
Looking forward

“Turkey, as the next G20 Presidency, has the opportunity to work with G20 leaders and ensure strong commitments and agreement can be reached ahead of the Paris Climate Summit in 12 months’ time.”
Climate change was discussed at the G20 talks, after a campaign to put the topic on the agenda
© WWF Australia Enlarge

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