Projects in the S-E Asia Bioregion

Priority landscapes within the AREAS South-east Asia Bioregion / ©: WWF
Priority landscapes within the AREAS South-east Asia Bioregion
© WWF
Over the last ten years, rhino and elephant habitat in Southeast Asia has been rapidly logged or converted to oil palm and pulp wood plantations.
Fires used to clear land have raged out of control consuming additional forests. The smoke from the fires of the late 1990s could be seen from space and made international headlines.

WWF has worked to establish Sumatra's Bukit Tigapuluh National Park in Riau province and destroyed access to logging roads within the park to prevent illegal logging.

WWF is also working in the policy arena to develop best management practices for palm oil plantations and working with the international banking sector to discourage the financing of environmentally destructive practices.

As in other Asian regions, human-elephant conflict is a problem, and AREAS searches for ways to reduce it.


Priority Landscapes in the Indochina Bioregion
Estimated rhino population
Estimated elephant population*
Greater one-horned
Javan
Sumatran
Northern Borneo ("Heart of Borneo"):
Kinabatangan to
Sebuku-
Sembakung
Landscape
(Malaysia,
Indonesia)
Borneo Lowland
and Montane
Forests,
Sundaland
Rivers and
Swamps
    ~30-70 <2,000
Peninsular
Malaysia &
Southern Thailand
Peninsular
Malaysian
Lowland and
Montane Forests
    ~50 ~600
Riau, Sumatra
(Indonesia)
Sumatran Islands
Lowland and
Montane Forests,
Sundaland Rivers
and Swamps
      ~700
Bukit Barisan
Selatan, Sumatra
(Indonesia)
Sumatran Islands
Lowland and
Montane Forests,
Sundaland Rivers
and Swamps
    20-40 present in
small
numbers
Ujung Kulon, Java,
(Indonesia)
Banda-Flores Sea   50-60    

* Elephant population data are for the most part speculative at best. Several elephant populations have likely continued to decline, making it even more likely that numbers presented here have significant margins of error.

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