Indochina: Exploring, discovering and protecting rare species

Priority landscapes within the AREAS Indochina Bioregion / ©: WWF
Priority landscapes within the AREAS Indochina Bioregion
© WWF
Many parts of Indochina have yet to be fully explored. In fact, several new species of large mammals have recently been discovered there. For example, there is an antelope known only from horn specimens found in the Emerald Triangle.
Many parts of Indochina have yet to be fully explored. In fact, several new species of large mammals have recently been discovered there. For example, there is an antelope known only from horn specimens found in the Emerald Triangle.

WWF-supported scientists discovered the saola and giant muntjac in Vietnam in the mid-1990s. In 1999, the first images of Javan Rhinos were captured in camera traps supported by WWF, proving that this species was not extinct in Indochina as previously believed.

Collecting data on rhino and elephant populations in AREAS priorities is an important part of AREAS work in Indochina.

Priority Landscapes in the Indochina Bioregion
Global 200 Ecoregions
Estimated rhino population
Estimated elephant population*
Greater one-horned
Javan
Sumatran
Cat Tien (Vietnam) Annamite Range
Moist Forests
  <10   <50
Lower Mekong
Forests
(Cambodia,
Lao P.D.R.,
Vietnam)
Annamite Range
Moist Forests,
Indochina Dry
Forests,
Mekong River
      Several hundred
Tenasserim
Western Forest
Complex
(Thailand,
Myanmar)
Northern Indochina
Subtropical Moist
Forests, Kayah-
Karen/Tenasserim
Moist Forests,
Salween River
      1,000

* Elephant population data are for the most part speculative at best. Several elephant populations have likely continued to decline, making it even more likely that numbers presented here have significant margins of error.

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