Help save the world's smallest, rarest porpoise



Posted on 04 February 2013  | 
In the upper part of Mexico's Gulf of California lives the world's smallest porpoise, the vaquita. Rare and elusive, scientists believe that there are likely less than 200 remaining.

This endangered species—whose name means “little cow” in Spanish— has been in decline for years and is on the brink of extinction. Without new protections, it may be lost forever.

The porpoises become caught in fishing gear (gillnets intended for shrimp and fish) and drown. That’s why WWF is rallying supporters to urge the Mexican government to ban deadly gillnets in the porpoise’s habitat as soon as possible. Without it, the vaquita will most likely become extinct.

Environmental leaders from around the world have encouraged Mexico to protect the vaquita. Others can lend their voices to this effort as well by sending a letter of support to the Mexican president.

TAKE ACTION NOW TO HELP SAVE THE VAQUITA! 
Vaquita or Gulf of California Harbor porpoise (Phocoena sinus) caught in fishing nets, Baja California, Mexico.
Vaquitas are so rare that there are almost no photographs of them alive. This one fell victim to a gillnet.
© National Geographic Stock/Flip Nicklin/Minden Pictures / WWF Enlarge

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