Jane Goodall Plants Trees with WWF on Sas Mountain, Budapest | WWF
Jane Goodall Plants Trees with WWF on Sas Mountain, Budapest

Posted on 21 August 2019

Life4Oak is implementing a unified nature conservation and forest management plan to make our oak forests more natural and healthy.
10 August 2019 (Sas-hegy, Budapest) – Dr. Jane Goodall planted three indigenous trees on the slopes of the Sas-hegy (Sas Mountain). The region is managed by the Danube-Ipoly National Park, and is also one of the sites for WWF-Hungary’s Life4OakForests Project. The event was organised within the framework of the Life4OakForests and Jane Goodall's Roots &Shoots Project.
 
Under the Life4OakForests Project WWF is restoring the natural state of oak forests by supressing invasive species, fostering forest regeneration processes by supressing the overly abundant bushes, and planting oaks and other indigenous species. During her recent visit to Hungary at the invitation of the Hungarian Jane Goodall Institute, Dr. Jane Goodall also contributed to our efforts. Following an inspiring speech, she and the participating children planted indigenous trees like sorb apples (Sorbus domestica), wild pear and downy oak (Quercus pubescens), species that will help the oak woods of Sas Mountain become more natural and resistant. The joint planting action expressed a will to act, and the importance of hands-on experiences in environmental protection. “Every little bit counts. In every single minute of every single day, everyone can do something to make the world a better place” - said Dr. Goodall.
 
The oak wood on Sas Mountain stands out from its city surroundings, and just like all the oak forests in Hungary, it contains high biodiversity. However, its existence is endangered by various invasive species. Sas-hegy is a hotspot for biodiversity and home to hundreds of different species, such as several orchid species, the St. Stephen carnation, greater pasque flower (Pulsatilla grandis), different spider and reptile species and the great stag beetle (Lucanus cervus). These precious species are endangered by both human presence and by invasive species such lilac, Robinia, Chinese knotweed and mahonia (Ranunculales).
 
Background
The 10-year Life4Oak Forests Project is being realised under the LIFE Nature Project, with the contribution of the LIFE financial instrument of the European Union and the Hungarian Ministry of Agriculture. Other partners include: Bükk National Park, Danube-Ipoly National Park, Balaton Uplands National Park, the Ecological Research Centre of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, WWF-Hungary, The Érmellék Association for Nature Conservation and Tourism, and the Italian Ente di gestione per i Parchi e la Biodiversita-Romagna Nature Conservation Directorate.
 
Life4Oak is implementing a unified nature conservation and forest management plan to make our oak forests more natural and healthy. We are continuously monitoring and evaluating the ongoing changes in the forest structure and composition triggered by our interventions, such as the impact on vegetation, micro-habitats and some animal species or species groups described as umbrella species. Our overall aim is to elaborate management proposals based on our experiences that can be applied to widely to forestry conservation management in oak forests, or even generally in forest management.
 
The Roots & Shoots Programme inspires the younger generation to notice and address the environmental and social problems surrounding them, and to work on possible solutions. Roots Shoots was launched in 1991 and now operates in more than 110 countries.
Dr. Jane Goodall, Roots & Shoots Programme
© Boglarka Balogh
Inspiring the younger generation to notice and address the environmental and social problems surrounding them
© Boglarka Balogh
Planting indigenous trees like sorb apples, wild pear and downy oak
© Boglarka Balogh