Himalayas | WWF
© WWF / NEYRET & BENASTAR

Himalayas

View of the Everest massif from the Singalila hills, India,150 Kilometers away. From left to right: Mount Lhotse, Mount Everest, and Mount Makalu Sikkim.

Himalayas

 rel= © WWF / NEYRET & BENASTAR

The abode of snow

What
The Himalayan mountain system is the geographical divide that separates the Indian subcontinent from Central Asia. It was formed as a result of continental collision between the Indo-Australian and the Eurasian tectonic plates, millions of years ago.

Where & Area
It extends over 5 nations: Bhutan, China, India, Nepal and Pakistan and forms a massive arc of 2,500 kilometres, from west to east. The mountain system can be classified, from north to south, into 4 parallel longitudinal belts: Shivaliks, Himachal, Himadri, and the Trans Himalayas.

Why
Consisting of a series of parallel and converging ranges, it is the highest mountain range in the world and is home to 14 of the world’s highest peaks including Mount Everest (8,850 metres/29,035 ft).

Due to its extreme climate and challenging landscape, it is fast becoming one of the most visited adventure destinations of the world.

The Himalayas are not just a geographical feature, but they also have great inspirational value. It is said that meditating on the Himalayas brings liberation in the form of true knowledge.

Mount Everest (8848 meters), Nepal. 
    © WWF / NEYRET & BENASTAR
Mount Everest (8848 meters), Nepal.
© WWF / NEYRET & BENASTAR
Blue Wildebeest, Connochaetes taurinus, at sunset. Amboseli National Park, Kenya
© Blue Wildebeest, Connochaetes taurinus, at sunset. Amboseli National Park, Kenya  © WWF / Martin HARVEY
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