Maasai Mara

Blue Wildebeest (<i>Connochaetes taurinus</i>), and Burchell's zebra (<i>Equus ... rel=
Blue Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus), and Burchell's zebra (Equus Burchelli) amongst herd of migrating wildebeest, Masai Mara National Reserve, Kenya.
© WWF-Canon / Martin HARVEY

Scene of the greatest show on earth?

What
One of Africa's most impressive and legendary game parks.

Where
Located in the South west corner of Kenya bordering Tanzania, the reserve, gazetted in 1961, is a natural extension of the Serengeti plains of Tanzania and is considered to be one of Africa's greatest wildlife reserves.

Area
The Maasai Mara covers an area of 1510km2 in the Great Rift Valley.

Why
It is said that no trip to Kenya would be complete without a trip to Masai Mara...

The word Mara means 'spotted', which refers to both the landscape, which is patched with groves of acacia and thorn bushes, and the colours of the various animals dotted around its vast, open grasslands.

From July to October, more than 1.3 million wildebeest & zebra begin to form a single herd that migrates from Serengeti into the Mara making it one of the world’s greatest natural spectacles.

This vast number of animals is moving to follow the rain patterns and the lush grass that springs up afterwards - so avoiding the relative drought which they leave behind. And where these grass eaters go, so do the meat eaters...

The Maasai Mara is also home to a variety of other wildlife, including the Big Five as well as cheetah, crocodile, hippo, hyena, and over 450 species of birds.
The Mara River flowing from its source, the South West Mau Forests in Kenya. / ©: WWF-EARPO / Sam Kanyamibwa
The Mara River flowing from its source, the South West Mau Forests in Kenya.
© WWF-EARPO / Sam Kanyamibwa

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