Fjords

Kong Oscars Fjord, Greenland (DK), Denmark. rel=
Kong Oscars Fjord, Greenland (DK), Denmark.
© WWF-Canon / KLEIN & HUBERT
What?
Fjords are narrow inlets of sea between steep-sided cliffs, formed as glaciation - past or present - extended below sea level. Coral reefs and skerries are often found with fjords.

Why?
All fjords make captivating destinations, and their exceptional natural beauty never fails to enchant visitors. The most pronounced fjords are found on the coasts of Norway, Iceland, Fiordland in southwest New Zealand, British Columbia in Canada down to Puget Sound, Alaska, and Chile. The longest fjords in the world are: Scoresby Sund on Greenland, (350 km), Sognefjord in Norway (203 km) and Hardangerfjord in Norway (179 km).

Ilulissat Icefjord, Greenland and West Norwegian Fjords – Geirangerfjord and Nærøyfjord were inscribed in the World Heritage List by UNESCO in 2004 and 2005 respectively.

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