Human-wildlife conflict

Conflict between people and animals is one of the main threats to the continued survival of many species in different parts of the world, and is also a significant threat to local human populatons. If solutions to conflicts are not adequate, local support for conservation also declines.

How would you react to an elephant in your backyard or a bear in your garden?

As human populations expand and natural habitats shrink, people and animals are increasingly coming into conflict over living space and food.

From baboons in Namibia attacking young cattle, to greater one-horned rhinos in Nepal destroying crops, to orangutans in oil palm plantations, to European bears and wolves killing livestock – the problem is universal, affects rich and poor, and is bad news for all concerned.

The impacts are often huge.

People lose their crops, livestock, property, and sometimes their lives. The animals, many of which are already threatened or endangered, are often killed in retaliation or to 'prevent' future conflicts.

Destroyed water pump because of African savanna elephant attack, Torra Conservancy, Kuene region, ... / ©: Jo BENN  / WWF-Canon
Destroyed water pump because of African savanna elephant attack, Torra Conservancy, Kuene region, Namibia.
© Jo BENN / WWF-Canon
Human-wildlife conflict is occurring more and more, affecting many different species. The effects of climate change will probably exacerbate the problem.
  • hwc human animal conflict / ©: WWF

    Report
    Common Ground - Solutions for reducing the human, economic and conservation costs of human wildlife conflict

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