Camera traps in China

WWF has supported the use of camera traps to photograph tigers in northeast China and pandas in Minshan Mountains in Sichuan Province.

A rare glimpse into panda habitat

These videos and photos showcase an array of endangered species in their remote habitats in southwestern Sichuan Province, including giant panda, red panda, Tibetan stump-tailed macaque and leopard cat.


“The multimedia materials are obtained under circumstances, where there was little external disturbance and therefore they truly reflect the conditions of those species in the wild,” said Jiang Zeyin, species programme officer at WWF-China.
A curious panda is snapped by an infrared camera trap. / ©: WWF
A curious panda is snapped by an infrared camera trap.
© WWF
© WWF China/An Zi He NR, Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Wang Lang NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Wang Lang NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Wang Lang NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Wang Lang NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Shen Guo Zhuang NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Wang Lang NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Wang Lang NR//Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Wang Lang NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Wang Lang NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Wang Lang NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Hei Zhu Gou NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/An Zi He NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Wang Lang NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Ye Le NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Wang Lang NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon © WWF China/Wang Lang NR/Peking University / WWF-Canon


Even more panda photos

A remote camera in northeast China, close to the Russian border, has captured the endangered Amur (Siberian) tiger in the wild, only the third time this amazing animal has been photographed in the area since 2003.


Wildlife officials at the Hunchun Nature Reserve set up the camera-trap with support from WWF and the Wildlife Conservation Society after a local farmer reported that a predator killed a cow. The next day, they retrieved the film and discovered the image of an adult tiger feeding on the carcass.

The photograph, taken at the end of 2006, provides evidence that the endangered cat species is slowly finding its way from the Russian Far East back into China where it once lived before over-hunting and poaching wiped out the population.

The Amur tiger is the largest living cat in the world, with a typical male weighing more than 250kg and measuring nearly 3m from nose to tip of the tail. Each adult needs a territory of around 50km2 to survive. Scientists count about 430 to 530 Amur tigers left in the wild, with the majority living in the Russian Far East. A few are found across the border in northern China and Korea.

WWF has designated China’s Hunchun Nature Reserve as a priority tiger conservation area. Through our offices in Harbin and the Russian Far East, we are working with local officials to improve tiger monitoring - using infrared cameras, GPS tracking and digital cameras - and helping establish an ecological network of protected areas to secure well-connected habitat for the Amur tiger.

An Amur (Siberian) tiger caught on film by a camera trap in the Hunchun National Nature Reserve, ... / ©: Hunchun National Nature Reserve
An Amur (Siberian) tiger caught on film by a camera trap in the Hunchun National Nature Reserve, China.
© Hunchun National Nature Reserve

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required