Cerrado Woodlands & Savannas

About the Area

The Cerrado constitutes one of the largest savanna-forest complexes in the world and contains a diverse mosaic of habitat types and natural communities, including open savanna with sparse trees and closed woodlands with little grass.
Among these communities are diverse grassland floras, including many species of large mammals and birds characteristic of this habitat type in southern South America.

Many species of plants here are endemic, and several are adapted to the high aluminum content of the soils. The ecoregion includes one of the most diverse and intact tropical grasslands on the planet.

Local Species
Found here are the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla), and the pampas cat (Oncefelis colocolo). Bird species include the rhea (Rhea americana), red-legged seriema (Cariama cristata), and the critically endangered and endemic Spix's macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii) - because of a long history of habitat loss and capture for pet trade, its entire wild population has been reduced, at last count, to a single male.

13 additional endemics, including white-striped warbler (Basileuterus leucophrys), cone-billed tanager (Nesospingus speculiferus), and the dwarf tinamou (Taoniscus nanus) call this ecoregion home.

Threats
Agricultural expansion (including frequent burning and charcoal production), degradation as a result of development, and water projects pose major threats to the Cerrado. Grazing of cattle, which destroys native grassland habitats, is also problematic.

Resources

Size:
190,000 sq km (74,000 sq miles)

Habitat type:
Tropical and Subtropical Grasslands, Savannas, and Shrublands

Geographic Location:
Eastern South America: southeast of the Amazon Basin, Bolivia, Brazil, and Paraguay

Conservation Status:
Vulnerable

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