Climate change impacts in Sweden

Climate change impacts in Sweden - what the IPCC 4th Assessment Report has found:
  • In several northern hemisphere mountain systems, treelines have markedly shifted to higher elevations during the 20th century such as in the Scandes [1.3.5.2].
  • Northward expansion of Tick (Ixodes ricinus) due to increased temperature, between 1982-1996 [1.3.5.2].
  • An increase in Tick-born encephalitis since the mid-1980s is consistent with milder climate in this period, but other explanations cannot be ruled [1.3.7.1] English Holly (Ilex aquifolium) poleward shift of northern margin due to increasing winter temperatures [1.3.5.2].
  • Disappearance of some types of wetlands (palsa mires) in Lapland; increased species richness and frequency at altitudinal margin of plant life [Table 12.1].
  • Arctic and sub-arctic ecosystems (particularly ombrotrophic bog communities; a form of wetland) above permafrost were considered likely to be most vulnerable to climatic changes, since impacts may turn arctic regions from a net carbon sink to a net source [4.4.6].
  • Some crops that currently grow mostly in S. Europe (e.g. maize, sunflower and soybeans) will become more suitable further north or at higher altitude areas in the south. Projections for a range of scenarios show a 30 to 50% increase in suitable area for grain maize production in southern Sweden by the end of the 21st century [12.4.7.1].
 / ©: Sveaskog
Sveaskog’s ecological landscape plans take into consideration the protection of High Conservation Value Forests, whose ecosystems house some of Sweden’s most threatened forest species.
© Sveaskog

WWF work

What WWF is doing on the ground in Sweden to protect against climate change:
  • WWF Sweden has drafted a vulnerability assessment proposal for the Baltic Sea Ecoregion and is currently working with local stakeholders and governments on integrating adaptation strategies in the region.

Key contacts

  • Miriam Geitz

    WWF Norway,
    Oslo

    +47 22 20 09 34

  • Lasse Gustavsson

    WWF International,
    Gland

    +41 22 364 9526

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