Climate change impacts in Madagascar

Climate change impacts in Madagascar - what the IPCC 4th Assessment Report has found:
  • Madagascar is significantly affected by ENSO (El Nino) and extreme weather events such as wind events [20.7.2].

WWF work

What WWF is doing on the ground in Madagascar to protect against climate change:

The waters surrounding Madagascar teem with life. The reef fish diversity is considerably richer than in the Hawaiian Islands or French Polynesia, and the diversity of coral themselves is the highest known in the western Indian Ocean and the Red Sea. A variety of marine mammal and sea turtle species are also found here.

Yet these ecosystems and animals are highly vulnerable to climate change.

The wetland and mangrove ecosystems that line the western coast are vulnerable to sea level rise.

Corals and the ecosystems they support are vulnerable to bleaching and changes in ocean chemistry.

Changes in seasonal current and weather patterns may dramatically affect primary productivity, larval transport, migration of whales and turtles, and reef health.

To help ensure the long term survival of Madagascar’s biodiversity, WWF will:

  • Assess the vulnerability of Madagascar’s marine environments to the impacts of climate change, the expected responses of marine species and ecosystems, and the feasible actions that can be taken to ensure the resilience and adaptation of the country’s biodiversity.
  • We will take a multifaceted approach, including a review of existing data and literature, modeling expected changes in oceanic and atmospheric conditions, local and international expert workshops, stakeholder consultations, and targeted field assessments to fill key knowledge gaps. This process will build capacity and awareness locally, and support president Marc Ravalomanana in his pledge to add one million hectares (3,800 square miles) of marine protected areas to the ocean around Madagascar.

WWF contact

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