Factsheet: Human-Animal Conflict



Posted on 08 March 2006  | 
Snow leopard (Uncia uncia), one of the many species that comes into conflict with humans.
© WWF / KLEIN & HUBERTEnlarge
Conflicts between humans and animals are a serious problem in many parts of the world. The damage and destruction caused by a variety of animals to human property - and sometimes to human life - is a real and significant danger to many human communities. And with the animals often killed, captured, or otherwise harmed in retaliation, these conflicts are one of the main threats to the continued survival of many species. WWF views human-animal conflict as a priority issue for its work on species protection.

In many parts of the world, people and animals are increasingly coming into conflict over living space and food. This is mainly due to expanding human populations and the continued loss of natural habitats. The impacts are often huge. People lose their crops, livestock, property, and sometimes their lives. The animals, many of which are already threatened or endangered, are often killed in retaliation or to 'prevent' future conflicts.

WWF and its partners have a number of projects around the world to reduce human-animal conflict and improve the livelihoods of the people affected. These projects range from traditional approaches such as compensation schemes to the development of novel strategies which address the root causes of the conflict. The solutions are often specific to the species or area concerned, and are often creative and simple.
Snow leopard (Uncia uncia), one of the many species that comes into conflict with humans.
© WWF / KLEIN & HUBERT Enlarge

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