Visualization of impacts of Arctic climate change unveiled at Paris climate talks | WWF

Visualization of impacts of Arctic climate change unveiled at Paris climate talks

Posted on
03 December 2015
WWF has teamed up with a Danish sculptor to graphically represent the consequences of climate change on life in the Arctic.

The sculpture 'Unbearable' depicts a polar bear impaled on a graph line representing the accumulation of CO2 in the atmosphere from pre-industrial times to the present.

“The aim of the sculpture is to illustrate the consequences of human over-consumption and lifestyle. World leaders must get their act together and commit to reduce CO2 emissions as much as science demands,” says sculptor Jens Galschiot.

 “This is just one symbol of an entire Arctic ecology at risk from climate change,” say Gitte Seeberg, Secretary General of WWF Denmark. “The changes in the Arctic are already affecting animals and peoples. It is crucial that we take our impact on the planet far more seriously.”

The sculpture will remain throughout the climate negotiations in front of the Cité Universitaire in Paris.

About Jens Galschiot:
Jens Galschiot is a Danish artist who for years has used his art activist. His works have been exhibited all over the world and among the main works are 'Pillar of Shame', 'Survival of the Fattest', 'The Inner Beast' and 'Fundamentalism'.

About WWF:
WWF is one of the world's largest and most influential nature and environmental organizations. WWF has over five million supporters and offices in over 100 countries.

About 'Unbearable':
'Unbearable' is created specifically for COP21. The sculpture is 12 meters long and five meters high. A smaller model of 'Unbearable' has been exhibited throughout the year in the office of  Mogens Lykketoft, President of the UN 70th General Assembly.
'Unbearable' is created specifically for COP21. The sculpture is 12 meters long and five meters high. A smaller model of 'Unbearable' has been exhibited throughout the year in the office of Mogens Lykketoft, President of the UN 70th General Assembly.
© Nina Munn / WWF