REPORT: Eating up forests - How EU consumption drives deforestation and land conversion: The case of soy from Brazil | WWF

REPORT: Eating up forests - How EU consumption drives deforestation and land conversion: The case of soy from Brazil

Posted on
21 May 2015
The EU, as a signatory party to the UN Declaration on Forests, has com mitted to “at least halve the rate of loss of natural forests globally by 2020 and strive to end natural forest loss by 2030” and to support and help “the private sector meet the goal of eliminating deforestation from the production of agricultural commodities such as palm oil, soy, paper and beef products by no later than 2020”.

Despite acknowledging the need to address the environmental impact of its consumption, the EU2 has not yet taken significant steps to address its impact abroad and to balance its consumption. The 7th Environmental Action Programme of the EU aims to significantly reduce the environmental impact of EU consumption by 2020, in particular in the food, housing and mobility sectors. It proposes the development of an EU action plan on deforestation and forest degradation. T his provides a unique opportunity for EU political action.

WWF envisions a world where humanity lives within the Earth’s ecological limits and shares its resources equitably. Policy measures and industry initiatives addressing deforestation and forest degradation, as well as the loss of other valuable ecosystems, are crucial if we want to maintain a healthy living planet. A comprehensive set of measures would need engagement in a number of different sectors and policy areas including finance, development, trade, consumption and production of commodities and products. Though consumer measures are important as well, these are not the focus of this publication.
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