Fight for the Great Barrier reef



Posted on 20 August 2013    
In the Great Barrier Reef, larger fish inside no-take areas produce disproportionately more eggs and larvae than in areas that are fished. Besides their contribution to sustaining fisheries, no-take areas can also improve habitat quality, protect ecosystem structure and function, and maintain ecosystem goods and services.
© Jürgen Freund / WWF
Plans to develop mega-ports to export minerals threaten the
integrity and wildlife riches of this world-renowned reef, and the AU$6billion 60,000 job reef-based tourism sector. Progress on
water quality and farm runoff could be buried under millions of tonnes of seabed material dredged for port development and dumped in the reef. WWF is calling for no further port development until a plan to properly protect the reef is in place. A Twitter storm in June mobilized millions of people in support of the iconic reef.
In the Great Barrier Reef, larger fish inside no-take areas produce disproportionately more eggs and larvae than in areas that are fished. Besides their contribution to sustaining fisheries, no-take areas can also improve habitat quality, protect ecosystem structure and function, and maintain ecosystem goods and services.
© Jürgen Freund / WWF Enlarge

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