UN body acts on destruction of sharks



Posted on 31 May 2013  | 
An historic and precedent-setting CITES vote has initiated regulation of trade in five shark species – three species of hammerhead, the porbeagle and oceanic whitetip – and two species of manta ray.
Recent reports show both sharks and rays - which share low breeding rates and late sexual maturity - have suffered huge losses due to fishing industry impacts in recent years. An estimated 100 million sharks are killed each year as bycatch in fishing nets and longlines, and many more are killed deliberately for their fins, an Asian delicacy.
The humphead wrasse, already regulated by CITES, is continuing to suffer from illegal and unregulated trade, so CITES has proposed measures to better control the trade.

Scalloped hammerhead shark finned alive and thrown overboard to drown (<i>Sphyrna lewini</i>) previously caught on longline fishing hook, Cocos Island, Costa Rica, Pacific Ocean, WHS
Like thousands and probably millions of other sharks each year, this scalloped hammerhead shark is finned alive and thrown overboard to drown (Sphyrna lewini) previously caught on longline fishing hook, Cocos Island, Costa Rica, Pacific Ocean, WHS
© naturepl.com/Jeff Rotman / WWF Enlarge

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required