Business meet to push for ambitious action on climate change



Posted on 04 August 2011  | 
London – Ahead of a key United Nations meeting later this year, hundreds of business, government and civil society leaders will come together next month for the Business for the Environment (B4E) Climate Summit in London to call for more action to fight climate change.

Held on 12-13 Sept. under the banner Reaching for Zero, Innovation, Growth and the Clean Industrial Revolution, the summit will produce a joint statement and call for action on climate change aimed at policymakers taking part in the next United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) meeting to be held in December in Durban, South Africa.

The summit will bring together more than 400 leaders from business, government, academia and civil society from more than 20 countries. Their statement will be published in a book together with examples of transformative climate solutions and promoted through a global communications campaign.

'Strong action from business will be vital if we are to heed the clear warnings from climate science and get global emissions on a steep downward path,” David Nussbaum, Chief Executive, WWF-UK.

“ Forward-looking businesses hold many of the solutions, and can also help to unlock political will to take action. One recent example is the coalition of more than 70 companies who have called on European leaders to increase the ambition of Europe's 2020 emissions target to deliver cuts of 30%. WWF hopes that the B4E Climate Summit in London will also send a strong voice from the business community towards the international climate talks, making clear that strong policy frameworks are needed to promote the green economy.”

Seven sector-focused working groups will have delegates summarise their industry commitments on climate change, and propose the support and policy action required, both national and global, to scale these actions up.

Participants will include the United Nations Development Programme, Hitachi, Unilever, Google, Procter & Gamble, Tata Consulting Services, Coca-Cola, Deloitte, Johnson Controls, Land Lease, AECOM, AP Moeller Maersk, Deutsche Post DHL, First Solar, BP Alternative Energy, Rio Tinto and the UK Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, amongst others.

An overview of the programme and participating speakers is available on the B4E website at www.b4esummit.com.

The summit will be hosted in partnership with WWF, CNN International, McKinsey & Company, the Aldersgate Group, Imperial College London and Global Initiatives.

Key renowned figures speaking include Andrew Steer, Special Envoy for Climate Change, The World Bank; Bjorn Stigson, President, World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD); Mark Kenber, CEO, The Climate Group; John Elkington, Founding Partner & Executive Chairman, Volans; Janine Benyus, President, The Biomimicry Institute and Paul Dickinson, Executive Chairman, The Carbon Disclosure Project. They will be joined by industry leaders Sir Stephen Gomersall, Chairman, Hitachi Europe; Jerry Stokes, President, Suntech Europe; Richard Evans, President, PepsiCo UK & Ireland; Lord Browne, Partner and Managing Director, Riverstone LLC; Ben Goldsmith, Founding Partner, WHEB Partners and others.

“The B4E Summit will call for a higher level of collaborative action on climate change; business, government and NGOs will discuss the massive investment, innovation and policy shift required to accelerate transformative change” said Tony Gourlay, CEO of Global Initiatives.

CNN is the Global Broadcast Partner of B4E Climate Summit 2011

WWF International’s Executive Director of Conservation Lasse Gustavsson at the B4E, Business for the Environment, the annual global summit facilitating dialogue and business-driven action for the environment.
WWF International’s Executive Director of Conservation Lasse Gustavsson at the B4E, Business for the Environment meeting in Jakarta, Indonesia earlier this year.
© Irza RINALDI / WWF-Indonesia Enlarge

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