Next week Earth Hour will be early celebrated in Copenhagen



Posted on 11 December 2009  | 
We can all show our support by sending in our own lantern

In spite of the fact that many of us might not be able to join the current climate discussions in Copenhagen this month, we can express our support through two accessible and creative tools launched by WWF: either sending a personalized lantern to help lighting the spirit of responsibility within Earth Hour Copenhagen next week (click here to send your lantern), or Voting Earth along with tens of thousands of people who have already done so all around the world (click here to cast your vote).

On December 16th, the City of Copenhagen will celebrate a single-city Earth Hour while it is hosting the crucial international conference intended to produce a new deal to stabilize the earth’s climate.

The special Earth Hour, involving Copenhagen citizens turning out their lights for one hour at 7 pm next Wednesday, will demonstrate the city’s support for world’s leaders reaching agreement on fair and effective ways to reduce the risks of catastrophic climate change.

Earth Hour Copenhagen follows and builds on the overwhelming support for effective climate action demonstrated by hundreds of millions of people from 88 countries turning off lights for Earth Hour on March 28th earlier this year, as well as setting the stage for Earth Hour 2010 to be held on March 27th. Bolivia will also be joining in, for the third consecutive year, and has already confirmed the support of at least three major cities and tens of national organizations and institutions.

In March of this year, more than 4,000 cities and towns, including nine of the world’s 10 largest cities, participated in the event which saw the lights go out on many of the world’s great landmarks, including ancient wonders the Pyramids and the Parthenon and national icons such as the Redeemer Christ Monuments in Santa Cruz, Cochabamba (Bolivia) and Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), Sydney Harbour Bridge and Opera House, Table Mountain, Big Ben, the Empire State building and the Eiffel Tower.

Earth Hour 2009 also drew the support of leading world figures such as UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon and Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who called climate change “the greatest human-induced crisis facing the world today”.

WWF International Director General James Leape said that the citizens of Copenhagen will become ambassadors for the rest of the world in calling for action on climate change at the UN Summit. “Schools, churches, businesses and individuals in just one city can make a powerful statement on behalf of their fellow citizens around the planet.

“With hundreds of millions of people participating, this year’s Earth Hour delivered an unequivocal global mandate calling for action at Copenhagen.


For more information, please contact:

Kath Kissell
Earth Hour Global
T: +61 (0) 408 408 562
E: kkissell@wwf.org.au


About Earth Hour’s Vote Earth
Earth Hour’s Vote Earth campaign builds on the call for action on climate change provided by millions of people, companies and communities during Earth Hour. The campaign aims to provide a platform for the people of the world to deliver world leaders a mandate for the right decision to be made at the United Nations Climate Summit in Copenhagen in December 2009. Find out more about the campaign at www.earthhour.org and www.panda.org/bolivia/lahoradelplaneta.


About WWF
WWF is one of the world's largest and most respected independent conservation organizations, with almost 5 million supporters and a global network active in over 100 countries. WWF's mission is to stop the degradation of the earth's natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world's biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption.
Farol para Copenhague
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